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Films - February 2017

Languages

Czech

French

Silent


Danish

German

Spanish


English

Japanese

Turkish

Farsi

Kazakh

Czech

Stuck with a Perfect Woman

(Bezva zenska na krku)

Directed by Tomas Hoffman

(Czech Republic, 2016, 97 min.)

Eliska is caught off guard when her husband falls for a younger woman, leaving her to start life anew at 40. With little choice for lodging, she decides to move into a former morgue. Little does she know that a sarcastic gravedigger with a chip on his shoulder already occupies the small house, leading to a series of comical encounters that could bring them together.

The Avalon Theatre

Wed., Feb. 8, 8 p.m.

Danish

Land of Mine

(Under sandet)

Directed by Martin Zandvliet

(Denmark/Germany, 2015, 100 min.)

A young group of German POWs are made the enemy of a nation, where they are now forced to dig up 2 million land-mines with their bare hands (Danish, German and English).

Angelika Mosaic

Opens Fri., Feb. 17

English

Arrival

Directed by Denis Villeneuve

(U.S., 2016, 116 min.)

When mysterious spacecraft touch down across the globe, an elite team — led by expert linguist Louise Banks — is brought together to investigate. As mankind teeters on the verge of global war, Banks and the team race against time for answers — and to find them, she will take a chance that could threaten her life, and quite possibly humanity (English, Russian and Mandarin).

AFI Silver Theatre

Atlantic Plumbing Cinema

Daughters of the Dust

Directed by Julie Dash

(U.S., 1991, 112 min.)

At the dawn of the 20th century, a multigenerational family in the Gullah community on the Sea Islands off of South Carolina — former West African slaves who adopted many of their ancestors' Yoruba traditions — struggles to maintain their cultural heritage and folklore while contemplating a migration to the mainland, even further from their roots.

AFI Silver Theatre

Opens Fri., Feb. 17

Gold

Directed by Stephen Gaghan

(U.S., 2017, 121 min.)

Oscar winner Matthew McConaughey stars as a prospector desperate for a lucky break who teams up with a similarly eager geologist and sets off on a journey to find gold in the uncharted jungle of Indonesia.

Angelika Mosaic

Atlantic Plumbing Cinema

Hidden Figures

Directed by Theodore Melfi

(U.S., 2016, 127 min.)

In this untold true story, three brilliant African American women working at NASA serve as the brains behind one of the greatest operations in history: the launch of astronaut John Glenn into orbit, a stunning achievement that restored the nation's confidence.

AFI Silver Theatre

Atlantic Plumbing

I Am Not Your Negro

Directed by Raoul Peck

(France/U.S., 2017, 95 min.)

In 1979, James Baldwin wrote a letter to his literary agent describing his next project, which was to be a revolutionary, personal account of three assassinated leaders who were also his close friends: Medgar Evers, Malcolm X and Martin Luther King, Jr. At the time of Baldwin's death in 1987, he left behind only 30 completed pages of his manuscript. Now, in his incendiary new documentary, master filmmaker Raoul Peck envisions the book James Baldwin never finished.

Landmark's E Street Cinema

Opens Fri., Feb. 3

Jackie

Directed by Pablo Larraín

(U.S./Chile/France, 2016, 99 min.)

Following the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, first lady Jacqueline Kennedy fights through grief and trauma to regain her faith, console her children and define her husband's historic legacy.

AFI Silver Theatre

Angelika Mosaic

Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinema

Landmark's E Street Cinema

Lion

Directed by Garth Davis

(Australia, 2016, 120 min.)

A 5-year-old Indian boy gets lost on the streets of Calcutta, thousands of miles from home. He survives many challenges before being adopted by a couple in Australia. Not wanting to hurt his adoptive parents' feelings, he suppresses his past, his emotional need for reunification and his hope of ever finding his lost mother and brother for 25 years. But a chance meeting with some fellow Indians reawakens his buried yearning (English, Bengali and Hindi).

Angelika Mosaic

Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinema

Landmark's E Street Cinema

Silence

Directed by Martin Scorsese

(Mexico/Taiwan/U.S., 2017, 161 min.)

Two priests travel to Japan in an attempt to locate their mentor and propagate Catholicism.

Landmark's E Street Cinema

A United Kingdom

Directed by Amma Asante

(U.S./U.K./Czech Republic, 2017, 111 min.)

Prince Seretse Khama of Botswana causes an international stir when he marries a white woman from London in the late 1940s.

Angelika Mosaic

Opens Fri., Feb. 17

Farsi

Close-Up

(Nema-ye nazdik)

Directed by Abbas Kiarostami

(Iran, 1990, 98 min.)

This fiction-documentary hybrid uses a real-life sensational event — a young man arrested on charges that he impersonated filmmaker Mohsen Makhmalbaf — as the basis for a stunning, multilayered investigation into movies, identity, artistic creation and life itself (Farsi and Azerbaijani).

AFI Silver Theatre

Sat., Feb. 4, 3:15 p.m.

Dingomaro

Directed by Kamran Heidari

(Iran, 2014, 68 min.)

This documentary is a lively and pulsating portrayal of Hamid Said, one of the most successful musicians from the south Iranian province of Hormozgan.

National Museum of African Art

Sat., Feb. 18, 2 p.m.

Drought and Lies

Directed by Pedram Alizadeh

(Iran, 2016, 94 min.)

During a birthday celebration at a Caspian Sea getaway, lawyer Omid receives a call from his ex-wife, inflaming the jealousy of his current wife. The call sets in motion a round-robin of betrayal and soul-searching that sends ripples through their circle of family and friends.

National Gallery of Art

Sun., Feb. 12, 4 p.m.

Lantouri

Directed by Reza Dormishian

(Iran, 2016, 115 min.)

A member of a vicious criminal gang named Lantouri throws acid in the face of a criminal rights activist, who demands justice via the concept in Islamic law known as lex talionis: an eye for an eye.

National Gallery of Art

Sat., Feb. 18, 4:30 p.m.

Life, and Nothing More.

(Zendegi va digar hich)

Directed by Abbas Kiarostami

(Iran, 1992, 95 min.)

In 1990, the Koker region where Abbas Kiarostami filmed a prior movie, was devastated by a massive earthquake. In this meta-fictional investigation of truth and representation, actors playing Kiarostami and his son return to Koker to track down the boys who starred in the previous film.

AFI Silver Theatre

Sat., Feb. 11, 1:15 p.m.

Me (aka I)

Directed by Soheil Beiraghi

(Iran, 2016, 84 min.)

Actress Leila Hatami is a force of nature as the queen of Tehran's underground, where she plays a ruthless and enigmatic fixer, keeping one step ahead of the law as she forges passports, moves illicit booze via a bottled water company and effortlessly emasculates a musical protégé.

National Gallery of Art

Sat., Feb. 11, 4 p.m.

Radio Dreams

Directed by Babak Jalali

(U.S./Iran, 2016, 91 min.)

Mohsen Namjoo, a folk singer known as "Iran's Bob Dylan," delivers a brilliantly deadpan performance in this comedy as a put-upon program director of a Bay Area Persian-language radio station (Farsi and English).

National Gallery of Art

Sat., Feb. 4, 4:30 p.m.

The Salesman

(Forushande)

Directed by Asghar Farhadi

(Iran/France, 2017, 125 min.)

A young couple living in Tehran act together in an amateur production of Arthur Miller's "Death of a Salesman." When their flat becomes damaged, they are forced to move into a new apartment, where an intruder attacks the wife, prompting her husband to become an amateur detective in an attempt to find the assailant and soothe his wife's addled nerves.

Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinema

Opens Fri., Feb. 10

National Gallery of Art

Sun., Feb. 5, 4 p.m.

Taste of Cherry

Directed by Abbas Kiarostami

(Iran, 1997, 95 min.)

A middle-aged man drives through a barren landscape, looking for someone to agree to bury him after he commits suicide the following morning. He is eerily calm about his decision to end his life, despite the entreaties of each of the three candidates he tries to persuade. Their conversations become an evolving philosophical argument about the value of life in the face of death in what has been called Abbas Kiarostami's "greatest film."

National Gallery of Art

Sat., Feb. 25, 4:30 p.m.

Ten

(Dah)

Directed by Abbas Kiarostami

(Iran, 2002, 91 min.)

Ten-year-old Amin Maher hops into a car in Tehran and begins an electrifying 10-minute battle with his unseen mother over her divorce and remarriage. Later, his strikingly attractive mother engages in nine other front-seat conversations — with her sister, a female friend, an elderly female pilgrim and an unseen prostitute.

AFI Silver Theatre

Sun., Feb. 19, 2:45 p.m.

Through the Olive Trees

(Zire darakhatan zeytun)

Directed by Abbas Kiarostami

(France/Iran, 1994, 103 min.)

The final film in Abbas Kiarostami's Koker Trilogy is an investigation of the complex relationship between cinema and real life, as a woman who recently spurned a man's marriage proposal is forbidden by family and tradition from speaking to him — except within the fiction of the film.

AFI Silver Theatre

Sun., Feb. 12, 1:15 p.m.

Where is the Friend's Home?

(Khane-ye doust kodjast?)

Directed by Abbas Kiarostami

(Iran, 1987, 83 min.)

The first of Abbas Kiarostami's films to gain significant attention outside of his home country, "Where is the Friend's Home?" follows Ahmed, a young boy on a mission to return a notebook to his classmate after he takes it home by mistake.

AFI Silver Theatre

Sun., Feb. 5, 3:15 p.m.

The Wind Will Carry Us

(Bad ma ra khahad bord)

Directed by Abbas Kiarostami

(Iran/France, 1999, 118 min.)

A journalist posing as an engineer travels to a remote Kurdish village with a secret aim: to record an ancient mourning ritual for a dying century-old woman. When the woman stubbornly refuses to die, the "engineer" is forced to slow down and interact with the town's inhabitants.

AFI Silver Theatre

Sat., Feb. 18, 1:15 p.m.

 

French

Certified Copy

(Copie conformé)

Directed by Abbas Kiarostami

(France/Italy/Belgium/Iran, 2010, 106 min.)

British intellectual James meets French shopkeeper Elle (Juliette Binoche) after he gives a reading in a Tuscan town. Walking and talking their way through the beautiful surroundings, the pair begin to playact as lovers, a charade they carry to surprisingly great lengths (French, English and Italian).

AFI Silver Theatre

Sat., Feb. 25, 1:15 p.m.,

Mon., Feb. 27, 7:15 p.m.

German

Toni Erdmann

Directed by Maren Ade

(Germany/Austria/Romania, 2016, 162 min.)

A father who is a divorced music teacher and an old-age hippie of sorts — with a passion for bizarre pranks involving fake personas — decides to reconnect with his adult daughter, a high-powered business consultant posted in Bucharest (German, English and Romanian).

Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinema

Japanese

Like Someone in Love

Directed by Abbas Kiarostami

(France/Japan, 2012, 109 min.)

Abbas Kiarostami's second feature made outside of Iran takes place in Tokyo, where Akiko, a college student moonlighting as a prostitute, is sent to the apartment of an elderly gentleman who just wants to spend the night talking. The next morning, when he drops her off at her university, Akiko's boyfriend mistakes him for her grandfather, and the old man elects not to correct him.

AFI Silver Theatre

Sat., Feb. 25, 3:30 p.m.,

Tue., Feb. 28, 7:15 p.m.

Kazakh

The Eagle Huntress

Directed by Otto Bell

(U.K./Mongolia/U.S., 2016, 87 min.)

This spellbinding documentary follows Aisholpan, a 13-year-old nomadic Mongolian girl who is fighting to become the first female eagle hunter in twelve generations of her Kazakh family.

West End Cinema

Silent

The Red Turtle

(La tortue rouge)

Directed by Michael Dudok de Wit

(France/Belgium, 2017, 81 min.)

This haunting and magical tale, told wordlessly but eloquently, is a simple fable of a man shipwrecked on a tropical island, and his efforts to survive. The island is populated by birds and crabs and is one day visited by a large sea turtle that seems to have mysterious intentions.

Angelika Mosaic

Landmark's E Street Cinema

 

Spanish

Julieta

Directed by Pedro Almodóvar

(Spain, 2016, 99 min.)

Julieta is a middle-age woman living in Madrid with her boyfriend who has been apart from her daughter for 12 years. After a casual encounter, the brokenhearted woman decides to confront her life and the events that led to her daughter's estrangement.

Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinema

 

Turkish

Kedi

Directed by Ceyda Torun

(Turkey/U.S., 2017, 80 min.)

Hundreds of thousands of Turkish cats roam the metropolis of Istanbul freely. For thousands of years they've wandered in and out of people's lives, becoming an essential part of the communities that make the city so rich. Claiming no owners, the cats of Istanbul live between two worlds, neither wild nor tame — and they bring joy and purpose to those people they choose to adopt.

Landmark Theatres

Opens Fri., Feb. 24