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April 2011

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Women’s Rights Advocate Hasn’t Shied From Criticizing Islam

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Last Edited on Tuesday, June 24, 2014 By Michael Coleman Thursday, November 18, 2010

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Giving Voice to Arab Americans So Phobia Won’t Silence U.S. Principles

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Last Edited on Tuesday, June 24, 2014 By Michael Coleman Thursday, November 18, 2010

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Will the Year of African Elections Cement Democracy or Sow Discord?

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Last Edited on Tuesday, June 24, 2014 By Jon Rosen Tuesday, March 29, 2011

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Ex-Im Bank Helps U.S. Exporters Stay Competitive in Cut-Throat World

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Last Edited on Tuesday, June 24, 2014 By Larry Luxner Tuesday, March 29, 2011

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Qaddafi’s Man No More: Disgusted, Envoy Breaks Free of Former Boss

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Last Edited on Tuesday, June 24, 2014 By Larry Luxner Tuesday, March 29, 2011

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Will Aftershocks from Japan Rock Fragile World Economy?

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By Stephen S. Roach

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Americans Have Long, Love-Hate Relationship with International Law

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Last Edited on Tuesday, June 24, 2014 By Rachel Bade Tuesday, March 29, 2011

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Embassies Get Into Spirit of In Vino Diplomacy

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Last Edited on Tuesday, June 24, 2014 By Jacob Comenetz Tuesday, March 29, 2011

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Overexposed? Weighing Risks, Benefits of CT Scans

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By Gina Shaw

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Rooftops Become Hotspots at Select Washington Hotels

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By Rachael Bade

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Among Baltic Region’s Many Charms: Its Resilience and Beauty

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By Anna Gawel

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Despite Downturn, High-End Real Estate Holding Up Quite Well

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By Stephanie Kanowitz

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Deluge of Development Changing Fortunes on Banks of Anacostia River

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By Luke Jerod Kummer

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Philip Guston: A 'Roma' Retreat at the Phillips Collection

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By Jacob Comenetz

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Canaletto and Company Capture Landmark City on the Water

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By Jacob Comenetz

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Private Indian Couple Dedicates Careers to Public Service

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By Gail Scott

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Who’s Afraid of Albee? Not Arena Stage

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By LIsa Troshinsky

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Stravinsky Reignited

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By Rachel Bade

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Weaving Intelligent Design Into ‘Fabric’ of Modern Life

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By Michael Coleman

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Ambassador Theater Fosters Artistic Relations, Cultural Dialogue

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By Stephanie Kanowitz

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Canadian Dozen Offers Change of Pace to Runaway Change

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By Gary Tischler

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Newseum Restaurant Delivers Puck the Chef, Not the Celebrity

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By Rachel G. Hunt

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Bullies, Violence Make ‘In a Better World’ Not so Much Better

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By Ky N. Nguyen

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Mia Wasikowska Hops from Burton Wonderland to Brontë Classic

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By Ky N. Nguyen

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Films - April 2011

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Languages

Czech English Italian Spanish
Danish French Japanese
Dutch
German
Korean


Czech


From Subway with Love

(Román pro zeny)
Directed by Filip Renc
(Czech Republic, 2005, 95 min.)
A 20-something women's magazine editor and her widowed mother cross paths in their search for Mr. Right in this award-winning romantic comedy.
The Avalon Theatre
Thu., April 21, 8 p.m.
 

Danish


In a Better World
(Hævnen)
Directed by Susanne Bier
(Denmark/Sweden, 2010, 113 min.)
The lives of two Danish families cross each other, and an extraordinary but risky friendship forces everyone to come to terms with the complexity of human emotions, pain and empathy. (Danish, Swedish and English)
Landmark's E Street Cinema
Opens Fri., April 8
 

Dutch


Winter in Wartime
(Oorlogswinter)
Directed by Martin Koolhoven
(Netherlands/Belgium, 2008, 103 min.)
Near the end of World War II, a 14-year-old boy becomes involved with the Resistance after coming to the aid of a wounded British soldier. (Dutch, English and German)
Theater TBA
Opens Fri., April 15

 

English

African Cats
Directed by Alastair Fothergill and Keith Scholey
(U.S., 2011)
This Disney-produced nature documentary centers on two cat families and how they teach their cubs the ways of the wild.
Theater TBA
Opens Fri., April 22

Bhutto
Directed by Duane Baughman and Johnny O'Hara
(U.S./U.K., 2010, 111 min.)
The life of the late Pakistani Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto, who broke through the Islamic glass ceiling in a story of Shakespearean dimensions, is explored in this powerful documentary.
Washington DCJCC
Sun., April 3, 3 p.m.

Desert Flower
Directed by Sherry Horman
(U.K./Germany/Austria, 2009, 124 min.)
The autobiography follows a Somali nomad circumcised at age 3 and sold into marriage at 13 who fled Africa and went on to become an American supermodel and U.N. spokeswoman against circumcision. (English and Somali)
Landmark's E Street Cinema

Dial M for Murder
Directed by Alfred Hitchcock
(U.S., 1954, 105 min.)
An ex-tennis pro carries out a plot to murder his wife, but when things go awry, he improvises a brilliant plan B.
AFI Silver Theatre
April to June

Hanna
Directed by Joe Wright
(U.S./U.K./Germany, 2011)
A 16-year-old raised by her father in the wilds of Finland to be the perfect assassin is dispatched on a mission across Europe, and tracked by a ruthless intelligence agent and her operatives. (English and French)
Theater TBA
Opens Fri., April 8

I Am
Directed by Tom Shadyac
(U.S., 2010, 80 min.)
Director Tom Shadyac speaks with intellectual and spiritual leaders about what's wrong with our world and how we can improve both it and the way we live in it.
Landmark's E Street Cinema

Jane Eyre
Directed by Cary Joji Fukunaga
(U.K., 2011, 115 min.)
A mousy governess who softens the heart of her employer soon discovers that he's hiding a terrible secret in Charlotte Bronte's classic tale.
AFI Silver Theatre
Opens Fri., April 1
Landmark's E Street Cinema

Kiki's Delivery Service
(Majo no takkyûbin)
Directed by Hayao Miyazaki
(Japan, 1989, 103 min.)
This magical tale from anime master Hayao Miyazaki tells the story of a 13-year-old witch-in-training and her talking cat.
Freer Gallery of Art
Sat., April 2, 11 a.m.

Miral
Directed by Julian Schnabel
(France/Israel/Italy/India, 2010, 112 min.)
An orphaned Palestinian girl growing up in the wake of Arab-Israeli war finds herself drawn into the conflict.
Landmark's E Street Cinema
Opens Fri., April 1

Notorious
Directed by Alfred Hitchcock
(U.S., 1946, 101 min.)
Ingrid Bergman is asked to spy on a group of suspected Nazi collaborators in South America, while Cary Grant is the U.S. government agent worried she may be going too far with the ruse.
AFI Silver Theatre
April to June

Rebecca
Directed by Alfred Hitchcock
(U.S., 1940, 130 min.)
When a naive young woman marries a rich widower and settles into his gigantic mansion, she finds the memory of the first wife maintains a powerful grip on her husband and the servants.
AFI Silver Theatre
April to June

Rio
Directed by Carlos Saldanha
(Brazil/Canada/U.S., 2011, 92 min.)
When Blu, a domesticated macaw from small-town Minnesota, meets the fiercely independent Jewel, he takes off on an adventure to Rio de Janeiro with this bird of his dreams.
Theater TBA
Opens Fri., April 15

Rubber
Directed by Quentin Dupieux
(France, 2010, 85 min.)
When Robert, an inanimate tire, discovers his destructive telepathic powers, he soon sets his sights on a desert town and a mysterious woman who becomes his obsession.
Theater TBA
Opens Fri., April 15

Shadow of a Doubt
Directed by Alfred Hitchcock
(U.S., 1943, 108 min.)
A young woman discovers her visiting "Uncle Charlie" may not be the man he seems to be.
AFI Silver Theatre
April to June

Shoah
Directed by Claude Lanzmann
(France, 1985, Part 1: 273 min., Part II: 292 min.)
Twelve years in the making, Claude Lanzmann's monumental epic on the Holocaust features not only historical footage but interviews with survivors, bystanders and perpetrators that "reincarnate" the Jewish tragedy. (English, German, Hebrew, Polish, Yiddish and French)
AFI Silver Theatre
Part 1: Sat., April 2, 1 p.m.,
Sun., April 3, 4:30 p.m.
Part II: Sat., April 9, 1 p.m.
Sun., April 10, 3:30 p.m.

Strangers on a Train
Directed by Alfred Hitchcock
(U.S., 1951, 101 min.)
A psychotic socialite confronts a tennis star with a theory on how two complete strangers can get away with murder.
AFI Silver Theatre
April to June

Stravinsky: Once at a Border
Directed by Tony Palmer
(U.K., 1982, 166 min.)
This autobiographical film about one of the most influential composers of the 20th century includes documents, photographs and footage never show before publically as part of Post-Classical Ensemble's "The Stravinsky Project." (Screens with "A Stravinsky Portrait")
National Gallery of Art
Sat., April 9, 1:15 p.m.

A Stravinsky Portrait
Directed by Richard Leacock and Rolf Liebermann
(U.S., 1966, 55 min.)
This documentary follows composer and conductor Igor Stravinsky at his homes in California, London and Hamburg as he conducts an orchestra rehearsal. (English, French and German; screens with "Stravinsky: Once at a Border")
National Gallery of Art
Sat., April 9, 4:45 p.m.


French


Arthur Rimbaud, a Biography
(Arthur Rimbaud, une Biographie)
Directed by Richard Dindo
(France/Switzerland, 1991, 143 min.)
In one of Richard Dindo's landmark documentaries, symbolist poet Arthur Rimbaud's turbulent career, drug addictions and early death are framed through interviews with his family and friends.
National Gallery of Art
Sat., April 23, 1 p.m.

Certified Copy
(Copie conforme)
Directed by Abbas Kiarostami
(France/Italy/Iran)
In Tuscany to promote his latest book, a middle-age English writer meets a French woman who leads him on a tour of the countryside, during which he is mistaken for her husband so the two keep up the pretense of being married. (French, Italian and English)
Landmark's E Street Cinema

Every Man for Himself
(Sauve Qui Peut (La Vie)
Directed by Jean-Luc Godard
(France, 1980, 87 min.)
A TV director — divorced, separated from his current girlfriend and slipping into a midlife crisis — meets a prostitute and takes her on as a tenant, while she takes him as a client.
AFI Silver Theatre
April 8 to 14

Four Adventures of Reinette and Mirabelle
(Quatre Aventures de Reinette et Mirabelle)
Directed by Eric Rohmer
(France, 1987, 95 min.)
A present-day variant on the country mouse and city mouse fable, this film follows the friendship of two young girls — a naïve young painter from the provinces and a worldly-wise student from Paris.
National Gallery of Art
Sat., April 30, 2:30 p.m.

Gauguin in Tahiti and the Marquesas
(Gauguin à Tahiti et aux Marquises)
Directed by Richard Dindo
(France, 2010, 68 min.)
Paul Gauguin's letters and other writings are paired with paintings and the settings that motivated them in this documentary chronicling the artist's journey to the South Pacific. (Screens with "Aragon, the Book of Matisse" (2003, 52 min.))
National Gallery of Art
Fri., April 1, 2:30 p.m.,
Fri., April 8, 2:30 p.m.,
Fri., April 15, 2:30 p.m.

Of Gods and Men
(Des hommes et des dieux)
Directed by Xavier Beauvois
(France, 2010, 120 min.)
Eight French Christian monks live in harmony with their Muslim brothers in a monastery perched in the mountains of North Africa in the 1990s, but when a crew of foreign workers is massacred by an Islamic fundamentalist group, the monks must decide whether to stay or leave.
Landmark's E Street Cinema

The Marsdreamers
(Les rêveurs de Mars)
Directed by Richard Dindo
(Switzerland/France, 2010, 83 min.)
In Southern California's Mojave Desert, members of the Mars Society — a loosely connected group of people who live modestly but spend time planning a better life on the Red Planet — don homemade spacesuits and wander the Mojave. (French and English)
National Gallery of Art
Sat., April 16, 2:30 p.m.

Potiche
Directed by François Ozon
(France, 2010, 103 min.)
When her husband is taken hostage by his striking employees, a trophy wife (Catherine Deneuve) takes the reins of the family business and proves to be a remarkably effective leader.
Theater TBA
Opens Fri., April 22

The Sign of Leo
(Le Signe du Lion)
Directed by Eric Rohmer
(France, 1959, 90 min.)
An American musician living high on the hog in Paris loses a grand inheritance and tries to make ends meet with help from his friends. (French, Italian and English; preceded by "Nadja à Paris" (1964, 13 min.))
National Gallery of Art
Sun., April 3, 4:30 p.m.

A Tale of Autumn
(Conte d'Automne)
Directed by Eric Rohmer
(France, 1998, 112 min.)
A middle-age wine producer and bookseller, good friends since childhood, become mixed up in a hopeless muddle when an outsider attempts to become the winemaker's matchmaker.
National Gallery of Art
Sun., April 24, 4:30 p.m.

A Tale of Springtime
(Conte de Printemps)
Directed by Eric Rohmer
(France, 1990, 108 min.)
A philosophy teacher whose fiancé is away finds herself moving into a new living arrangement where her involvements with the present occupants of the household turn curiously convoluted.
National Gallery of Art
Sun., April 10, 4:30 p.m.

A Tale of Summer
(Conte d'Été)
Directed by Eric Rohmer
(France, 1996, 113 min.)
A guitar-toting math graduate goes on vacation on the Brittany coast without the girl he's in love with, and strikes up a friendship with an intriguing waitress/graduate student.
National Gallery of Art
Sat., April 30, 4:30 p.m.

A Tale of Winter
(Conte d'Hiver)
Directed by Eric Rohmer
(France, 1992, 114 min.)
A woman who lost the love of her life after a whirlwind holiday romance due to a simple blunder years earlier forever keeps the faith that one day he will return.
National Gallery of Art
Sun., April 17, 4 p.m.
 

German

Liberators Take Liberties, Part I and Part II
(BeFreier und BeFreite)
Directed by Helke Sander
(Germany, 1991, Part I: 94 min., Part II: 111 min.)
After 46 years of silence, women who were raped by Red Army soldiers at the end of World War II talk for the first time publicly about the violent incidents that permanently scarred them. The second part of this controversial documentary explores the lasting ramifications of the attacks on the women and the resulting children.
Goethe-Institut
Part I: Mon., April 11, 6:30 p.m.,
Part II: Mon., April 18, 6:30 p.m.

In the Midst of the Malestream - Disputes on Strategy in the New Women's Movement
(Mitten im Malestream)
Directed by Helke Sander
(Germany, 2005, 92 min.)
This documentary explores the theory that many women want to have children, but choose to remain childless due to inflexible societal structures.
Goethe-Institut
Mon., April 4, 6:30 p.m.

Who Was Kafka?
(Wer war Kafka?)
Directed by Richard Dindo
(Switzerland/France, 2006, 98 min.)
Set in Prague, this documentary is a biographical portrait of renowned writer Franz Kafka as told by his family, lovers and friends.
National Gallery of Art
Sat., April 16, 12 p.m.


Italian


The Conformist

(Il conformista)
Directed by Bernardo Bertolucci
(Italy/France/West Germany, 1970, 115 min.)
During the fascism of the 1930s, a bourgeois Italian man undertakes a desperate quest to belong — ultimately discovering that demonic conformity is the surest route to depravity. (Italian, French and Latin)
AFI Silver Theatre
April 1 to 7

The Girlfriends
(Le Amiche)
Directed by Michelangelo Antonioni
(Italy, 1955, 104 min)
Fashion designer Clelia, just returned from Rome to her hometown of Turin to open a boutique, gets swept up in the glamour and excitement of her suicidal friend's fashionable set of friends.
AFI Silver Theatre
April 8 to 14

Mamma Roma
Directed by Pier Paolo Pasolini
(Italy, 1962, 110 min.)
A middle-age prostitute attempts to extricate herself from her sordid past for the sake of her son.
AFI Silver Theatre
April 1 to 7


Japanese


Kuroneko
Directed by Kaneto Shindô
(Japan, 1968, 99 min.)
In war-torn medieval Japan, a demon is ripping out the throats of samurai in the grove beyond, so the governor sends a fearless war hero to confront the spirit, but what he finds are two beautiful women (who look just like his lost mother and wife.
Landmark's E Street Cinema

Paprika
(Papurika)
Directed by Satoshi Kon
(Japan, 2006, 90 min.)
In director Satoshi Kon's final film, a machine that allows people to enter one another's dreams is stolen and the chaos that results is a breathtaking meditation on the nature of consciousness.
Freer Gallery of Art
Sat., April 2, 7:30 p.m.

The Place Promised in Our Early Days
(Kumo no mukô, yakusoku no basho)
Directed by Makoto Shinkai
(Japan, 2004, 90 min.)
Two teenagers grow up in an imagined version of Japan that's divided between the United States and a mysterious organization known as "The Union" in this beautifully detailed anime film.
Freer Gallery of Art
Sat., April 2, 4:30 p.m.
 

Korean


Breathless
(Ddongpari)
Directed by Yang Ik-june
(South Korea, 2008, 130 min.)
A terrifyingly brutal debt collector stumbles into a friendship with a high school girl from a wildly dysfunctional family, who proves to be just as tough as he is.
Freer Gallery of Art
Sun., April 10, 2 p.m.

Hahaha
Directed by Hong Sang-soo
(South Korea, 2010, 115 min.)
Told in a series of flashbacks, two friends and would-be womanizers reminisce over drinks and discover they once unknowingly spent a weekend in the same place, at the same time, and met their match in a high-strung tour guide.
Freer Gallery of Art
Sun., April 17, 2 p.m.

I Saw the Devil
(Akmareul boatda)
Directed by Kim Jee-woon
(South Korea, 2010, 141 min.)
A dangerous psychopath kills the pregnant fiancée of an elite special agent, who, obsessed with revenge, decides to track down the murderer, even if doing so means becoming a monster himself.
Landmark's E Street Cinema

Oki's Movie
(Ok-hui-ui yeonghwa)
Directed by Hong Sang-soo
(South Korea, 2010, 80 min.)
A young film student has affairs with her professor and a fellow student, but unlike typical romance films, the chronology of events are shuffled to emphasize the alternately humorous and heartbreaking trajectories of each relationship.
Freer Gallery of Art
Sun., April 24, 3 p.m.

Old Partner
(Wonangsori)
Directed by Lee Chung-ryoul
(South Korea, 2008, 78 min.)
In this touching documentary depicting traditional rural life in Korea, an octogenarian farmer lives out his final days with his long-suffering wife and his loyal ox — who ploughs his fields but is also his best friend.
Freer Gallery of Art
Sun., April 24, 1 p.m.

Paju
Directed by Park Chan-ok
(South Korea, 2009, 111 min.)
Set in a grim suburb of Seoul called Paju, a woman returns home after several years away to confront her brother-in-law about the mysterious death of her sister years ago.
Freer Gallery of Art
Fri., April 29, 7 p.m.

Poetry
(Shi)
Directed by Lee Chang-dong
(South Korea, 2010, 139 min.)
A 60-something grandmother in the early stages of Alzheimer's, faced with the discovery of a heinous family crime, finds strength and purpose when she enrolls in a poetry class.
Freer Gallery of Art
Fri., April 22, 7 p.m.

Possessed
(aka Disbelief Hell / Bool-sin-ji-ok)
Directed by Lee Yong-ju
(South Korea, 2009, 106 min.)
Hee-jin rushes home from college when her younger sister So-jin mysteriously disappears, but gets little help from her ultra-religious mother or the skeptical police. But when her neighbors start committing suicide in increasingly gruesome ways, it becomes clear that something supernatural is afoot.
Freer Gallery of Art
Fri., April 15, 7 p.m.

Secret Reunion
(Ui-hyeong-je)
Directed by Jang Hun
(South Korea, 2010, 116 min.)
A North Korean spy and a South Korean spy chaser — former adversaries who were both abandoned by their countries — meet by chance years later and form a tense business partnership, each concealing their past identities from the other.
Freer Gallery of Art
Fri., April 8, 7 p.m.  

Spanish


Carancho
Directed by Pablo Trapero
(Argentina/Chile/France/South Korea, 2010, 107 min.)
This film noir thriller exposes the medical and legal industries that profit from the deaths of the more than 8,000 people killed every year in road accidents in Argentina.
Landmark's E Street Cinema
Opens Fri., April 1

La Leyenda de la Nahuala
(The Legend of the Nahuala)
Directed by Ricardo Arnaiz
(Mexico, 2007, 78 min.)
In this animated children's film, it is the Day of the Dead in Mexico and a 9-year-old boy must rescue his older brother who's been captured by the ancient evil spirit Nahuala.
GALA Hispanic Theatre
Sat., April 16, 3 p.m.

Manuelita
Directed by Manuel García Ferré
(Argentina, 1999, 86 min.)
A young girl turtle who gets lost on a balloon trip in this animated tale based on a character that is as famous in Argentina as Winnie the Pooh is in the United States.
GALA Hispanic Theatre
Sat., April 30, 3 p.m.

Valentino y el Clan del Can
(Valentino and the "Can Clan")
Directed by Wendy Ramos
(Peru, 2008, 105 min.)
Valentino is a brave puppy that gets separated from his family but makes new friends with the "Can Clan" on the street and joins the circus.
GALA Hispanic Theatre
Sat., April 23, 3 p.m.
 

   

Events - April 2011

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EVENT CATEGORIES

Art Festivals Music Tournaments
Dance Galas Theater



FEATURE EVENT


Mexico Rides in to Host Preakness

May 21, 2011

The Embassy of Mexico will serve as the honorary host of the 2011 International Pavilion at the Preakness Stakes, the middle jewel in horse racing's famed Triple Crown that will be held at the historic Pimlico Race Course in Baltimore, Md., on May 21.

Following the success of the inaugural International Pavilion, hosted by the Spanish Embassy and Ambassador Jorge Dezcallar, the 2011 International Pavilion will invite dignitaries from the diplomatic and international business communities to explore the cultural variety and culinary specialities of Mexico, this year's featured nation.

"Mexico is honored to host the 2011 International Pavilion at the Preakness Stakes Race. The Preakness represents a great opportunity to showcase Mexico's traditions, rich past and contemporary cutting-edge culture, as well as to acknowledge the hard work and contributions of thousands of Mexicans involved in horse racing and the backstretch throughout the United States," said Ambassador Arturo Sarukhan, who noted: "I find it only fitting given that it was just in last year's Preakness that Mexican-born Martín García rode 'Lookin' at Lucky' to take the second jewel of the Triple Crown."

The International Pavilion is an invitation-only hospitality destination catering to ambassadors, heads of international organizations and prominent business leaders. Tom Chuckas, president of the Maryland Jockey Club, pointed out that in just one year, "The International Pavilion has become the premier destination at Pimlico on Preakness Day, and we are delighted to partner with the Embassy of Mexico and Ambassador Sarukhan in bringing the international community to the annual running of the Preakness."

For more information, visit www.preakness.com.
 

— Anna Gawel

 

ART

 April 2 to May 15
BRAVOS: Groundbreaking Spanish Design
With artists such as Pablo Picasso and Salvador Dali, Spain was already renowned for its art in the 20th century. But after the conversion to democracy, Spain also moved to the forefront of contemporary product and furniture design, as seen in the 21 young avant-garde designers featured in this show.
American University Katzen Arts Center

Through April 4
Latvian Art in Exile: 1944-1950
Paintings and drawings by refugee artists from Latvia, done in post-World War II Germany, reflect the creativity that sprung during a time when Latvian refugees came to terms with their decision to flee their homeland, turning to artwork in difficult camp conditions. For information, visit www.latvia-usa.org.
Embassy of Latvia

Through April 8
Trent Parke: Borderlands
Unsettling, sensual and brooding, more than 50 photographs created during a two-year, 55,000-mile journey through Australia demonstrate why Trent Parke — the first Australian to become a full member of the renowned Magnum Photo Agency — is one of the most innovative young photographers of his generation. (Photo ID required for entrance.)
Embassy of Australia Gallery

April 8 to July 30
Tom Wesselmann Draws
This marks the most comprehensive exhibition of drawings by Tom Wesselmann, a brilliant colorist and innovator who in the 1960s was one of the key leaders in the pop art movement alongside Andy Warhol and Roy Lichtenstein.
The Kreeger Museum

April 13 to June 18
Beyond the Labyrinth: Latin American Art and the FEMSA Collection
This wide-ranging display features 50 works by some of the most renowned Latin American artists of the past century, including Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo, David Alfaro Siqueiros, Rufino Tamayo, Roberto Matta and Fernando Botero, from an internationally renowned collection that spans cubism, surrealism, landscape, abstractionism and contemporary art.
Mexican Cultural Institute

April 17 to July 24
Gabriel Metsu 1629–1667
One of the most important Dutch genre painters of the mid-17th century, Gabriel Metsu captured ordinary moments of life with a freshness and spontaneity that was matched by his ability to depict materials with an unerring truth to nature.
National Gallery of Art

April 23 to May 22
NEXT at the Corcoran: BFA Class of 2011
The Corcoran presents this dynamic, interactive and innovative exhibition featuring the thesis work of the senior students in the bachelor of fine arts program at the Corcoran College of Art + Design.
Corcoran Gallery of Art

Through April 29
Approximate Landscape
(Ungefähre Landschaft - Superficies)

In Christoph Engel's photographs, golf courses in a barren, rocky landscape start to look like the palm of an outstretched hand — abstractions that visualize the grave consequences of human interventions into nature and the transformation of entire swaths of land pushed to the brink of ecological catastrophe.
Goethe-Institut

Through April 29
Canadian Impressions
To mark the 52nd Annual Meeting of Governors of the Inter-American Development Bank in Calgary, Alberta, in March, the IDB Cultural Center pays tribute to Canada by showcasing 12 printmakers from different regions in Canada whose multicultural backgrounds exemplify the fascinating cultural spectrum of Canada today.
Inter-American Development Bank Cultural Center

Through May 1
Cyprus: Crossroads of Civilizations
Cyprus, the eastern-most island in the Mediterranean Sea, situated at the crossroads of Europe, Asia and Africa, has been a meeting point for many of the world's great civilizations. Presented on the country's 50th anniversary of independence, "Crossroads" features more than 200 artifacts — covering nearly 11,000 years of history — from the earliest villages to masterpieces of medieval religious art.
National Museum of Natural History

Through May 1
Hang by Charlotte Gyllenhammar
Charlotte Gyllenhammar's thought-provoking photographic series is a gravity-defying journey that depicts women hanging upside down within the confines of their clothing in surrealistic states of vulnerability and weightlessness.
House of Sweden

Through May 8
In Small Things Remembered: The Early Years of U.S.-Afghan Relations
More than 100 reproductions of photographs and documents culled from private and public archives around the United States and Afghanistan — created for the State Department and U.S. Embassy in Kabul, the exhibit — offer an in-depth chronicle of the relationship between the two countries beginning with initial contacts in the early 20th century and continuing through the late 1970s.
Meridian International Center

Through May 14
Beyond Home Remedy: Women, Medicine, and Science
In this fascinating look at historic medicine concocted by women in Shakespeare's England, this exhibition highlights women at all levels of society — from the Countess of Kent to Mrs. Anne Coates — who were known to practice medicine.
Folger Shakespeare Library

Through May 15
Blinky Palermo: Retrospective 1964-1977
Though long celebrated throughout Europe, the influential postwar German-born painter Blinky Palermo has mostly escaped America's notice even though he continually expanded the definition of painting throughout his career. This exhibition marks the first comprehensive survey of his work in the United States.
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden

Through May 15
David Smith Invents
David Smith (1906-65), one of the country's most celebrated sculptors, was the first American sculptor to make welded steel sculpture, infusing this industrial material with a fluidity and imaginative creativity that is at once beautiful and muscular. The Phillips showcases pivotal moments in Smith's illustrious career, revealing the evolution of his personal aesthetic.
The Phillips Collection

Through May 15
Philip Guston, Roma
From the films of Federico Fellini to the vestiges of ancient Rome and the works of Italian masters, Philip Guston (1913-80) drew inspiration throughout his career from Italian art and culture. This exhibition of 39 paintings is the first to examine work Guston completed as an artist-in-residence at the American Academy in Rome in the early 1970s. (Part of "La Dolce DC," a citywide series of events celebrating Italy)
The Phillips Collection

Through May 22
Eye Wonder: Photography from the Bank of America Collection
By selecting offbeat subjects, shooting intense close-ups, or manipulating focus and color, the artists featured in "Eye Wonder" have created dreamy and often haunting photographic images from 1865 to today, sharing a universal understanding that photographs offer an illusion of reality that is as subjective a means of expression as other visual art forms.
National Museum of Women in the Arts

Through May 29
A Photographic Journey of the Ambassador's Daughter: Moscow, 2937-38
While life in 1930s Moscow was a mystery to the outside world, special diplomatic access was granted to Emlen Knight Davies, daughter of U.S. Ambassador Joseph E. Davies, whose large photographic prints — 30 of which are seen here — offer a rare insider's view of day-to-day life in the Soviet Union before the Cold War.
Hillwood Estate, Museum and Gardens

Through May 30
Venice: Canaletto and His Rivals
Venice inspired a school of competitive painters whose achievements are among the most brilliant in 18th-century art. This exhibition celebrates the rich variety of these Venetian views, known as vedute, through some 20 masterworks by Canaletto and more than 30 by his rivals. (Part of "La Dolce DC," a citywide series of events celebrating Italy)
National Gallery of Art

Through June 5
Gauguin: Maker of Myth
Paul Gauguin's sumptuous, colorful images of Brittany and the islands of the South Seas are among nearly 120 works in the first major look at the artist's oeuvre in the United States since the blockbuster 1988 National Gallery of Art retrospective "The Art of Paul Gauguin."
National Gallery of Art

Through July 17
The Orchid in Chinese Painting
Coinciding with the National Museum of Natural History's annual orchid show, the Sackler presents 20 works related to orchids in Chinese painting, ranging in date from the 15th to the 19th century.
Arthur M. Sackler Gallery

Through July 24
Word, Shout, Song: Lorenzo Dow Turner Connecting Community through Language
Lorenzo Dow Turner's foundational work in the 1930s established that people of African heritage, despite slavery, had retained and passed on their cultural identity through words, music and story wherever they landed. Features of the exhibition include rare audio recordings, photographs and artifacts from Turner's linguistic explorations into the African Diaspora.
Smithsonian Anacostia Community Museum

Through July 31
Echoes of the Past: The Buddhist Cave Temples of Xiangtangshan
Majestic sixth-century Chinese Buddhist sculpture is combined with 3D imaging technology in this exploration of one of the most important groups of Buddhist devotional sites in early medieval China: the Buddhist cave temples of Xiangtangshan carved into the mountains of northern China — home to a magnificent array of sculptures, from monumental Buddhas and divine attendant figures to crouching monsters framed by floral motifs.
Arthur M. Sackler Gallery

Through Oct. 2
In the Tower: Nam June Paik
A new exhibition featuring 20 works by groundbreaking contemporary artist Nam June Paik (1923–2006) is the third in a series of shows installed in the Tower Gallery that centers on developments in art since the midcentury.
National Gallery of Art

Through Dec. 4
Artists in Dialogue 2: Sandile Zulu and Henrique Oliveira
The second in a series of exhibitions in which two artists are invited to create new works — each inspired by, and in response to the other — this installment features Sandile Zulu, who lives in Johannesburg, and Henrique Oliveira, who lives in Sao Paolo, and their site-specific works composed of unlikely materials such as weathered wood and fire.
National Museum of African Art

Through December 2011
African Mosaic
A towering, striking sculpture of Haitian leader Toussaint Louverture by contemporary Senegalese artist Ousmane Sow is the centerpiece of this exhibition of important acquisitions over the last decade, including more than 100 traditional and contemporary works, some never before on display.
National Museum of African Art

DANCE


April 6 to 10
Le Corsaire
The Washington Ballet performs this swashbuckling adventure of pirates, panshas and the slave girls who love them in this new production of the 19th-century classic by Marius Petipa. Tickets are $20 to $125.
Kennedy Center Eisenhower Theater

FESTIVALS

Through April 15
Francophonie 2011 Cultural Festival
This annual extravaganza celebrating the cultural diversity of the Francophone (French-speaking) world features concerts, film, literary salons, seminars and other events. Highlights include a cutting-edge "Discothèque" at the National Postal Museum after hours on April 15. For information, visit http://francophoniedc.org or www.HouseofFranceDC.org.
Various locations

April 15 to 17
DC Tap Festival
The DC Tap Festival offers more than 30 classes for tappers at all levels and ages, as well as jam sessions, student showcases, tap history lectures and performances by an array of Grammy- and Emmy-winning artists as well groups from all over the world, including Dance Works of Taipei, Taiwan's premier tap dance ensemble. For information, visit www.dctapfestival.com.
Various locations

Through April 10
National Cherry Blossom Festival
To commemorate the 1912 gift of 3,000 cherry trees from Mayor Yukio Ozaki of Tokyo to the city of Washington, D.C., this widely anticipated festival offers a series of citywide events, from the popular family day at the National Building Museum to photo safaris around the Tidal Basin. For information, visit www.nationalcherryblossomfestival.org.
Various locations


GALAS


Sat., April 2, 6 p.m.
WPAS Annual Auction and Gala
This year's Washington Performing Arts Society's (WPAS) Annual Auction and Gala — to benefit the group's artistic initiatives and educational programs, including the Embassy Adoption Program — features Grammy winner Roberta Flack, whose legendary career has included hits such as "Killing Me Softly With His Song," as well as dinner and more than 100 live and silent auction items, all under the diplomatic patronage of Indian Ambassador Meera Shankar. Tickets are $600; for information, call (202) 293-9325 or visit www.wpas.org.
Marriott Wardman Park Hotel

Wed., April 6, 6:30 p.m.
National Alzheimer's Gala
The eighth annual Alzheimer's Association's National Alzheimer's Gala brings together political, business, philanthropic and social leaders to fight against the disease, including this year's host, Emmy-winning actor David Hyde Pierce, who will honor the editorial team of "The Shriver Report: A Woman's Nation Takes on Alzheimer's." Tickets are $500; for information, visit www.alz.org/galas/dc.
National Building Museum

Tue., April 12, 6:30 p.m.
Embassy Chef Challenge
Cultural Tourism DC's annual fundraising benefit, the Embassy Chef Challenge shines a spotlight on one of Washington's best-kept secrets: the world-class talents of embassy chefs, attracting more than 400 guests, a panel of celebrity judges and renowned chefs from the city's embassies for this third annual friendly cooking competition. Tickets are $250; sponsorships are also available. For information, visit www.culturaltourismdc.org.
The Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center

Tue., April 12, 7 p.m.
Brasserie Chic: La Coupole
The Alliance Française de Washington hosts this evening of Parisian charm featuring hors d'oeuvres by acclaimed chef Jean-Philippe Bourgueil of the legendary La Coupole brasserie in Paris; music by pianist Marcus Johnson with DJ Young Pulse; and a silent auction of photographs spotlighting water preservation and the historic La Coupole restaurant itself — with proceeds benefiting Rotary Club International. Tickets are $70; for information, visit www.francedc.org.
The Washington Club

Wed., April 13, 6:30 p.m.
2011 Folger Gala
The Folger Shakespeare Library's annual gala — which this year pays tribute to Gail Kern Paster, the library's director, who will be retiring at the end of June — is its most important fundraiser of the year, providing vital support to the cultural and educational programming the Folger offers to the greater Washington area. Tickets are $600; for information, call (202) 675-0359 visit www.folger.edu.
Folger Shakespeare Library


MUSIC

Fri., April 1, 7:30 p.m.
Mendelssohn Piano Trio: Spring in Vienna
The Mendelssohn Piano Trio, which recently presented a cycle of complete Beethoven piano trios in Portugal and D.C. to critical acclaim, performs a spring-inspired repertoire of Beethoven, Haydn and Schubert. Tickets are $50, including reception; for information, visit www.embassyseries.org.
Embassy of Austria

Sat., April 9, 7:30 p.m.
Randy Weston's African Rhythms Trio
The week of his 85th birthday, jazz master Randy Weston's African Rhythms Trio — with Alex Blake on bass and Neil Clarke on African percussion — joins drummer Lewis Nash for this inventive concert combo. Tickets are $30.
Kennedy Center Terrace Theater

Fri., April 29, 7:30 p.m.
Christian Tetzlaff and Antje Weithaas
Two of Europe's most innovative and exciting violinists, Christian Tetzlaff and Antje Weithaas, perform an imaginative program of Leclair, Bartók, de Bériot and Ysaÿe. Tickets are $125, including reception; for information, visit www.embassyseries.org.
German Residence


THEATER

April 6 to May 1
The Walworth Farce
A family's Sisyphean games are exposed when a father forces his two sons to reenact their troubled past through cross-dressing, slapstick and denial, as a young woman intrudes on their farce, irrevocably changing the family's life (part of "New Ireland: The Enda Walsh Festival"). Tickets are $44 to $65.
The Studio Theatre

Through April 10
The Agony and the Ecstasy of Steve Jobs
Mike Daisey pulls back the curtain veiling America's most mysterious technology icon with a wickedly funny tale of pride, beauty, lust and industrial design, illuminating the high-tech war — from China to Silicon Valley — and the human price we pay for our toys. Tickets start at $40.
Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company

Through April 10
Edward Albee Festival: Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?
As wickedly hilarious today as when it first shocked audiences, "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" is an ingeniously funny play that starts as a verbal sparring match between an older married couple at an impromptu cocktail party and devolves into a no-holds-barred battle of wits and wills. Tickets start at $40.
Arena Stage

Through April 24
Edward Albee Festival: At Home at the Zoo
In this meticulous and nuanced look at the lives of three New Yorkers, an everyday conversation between a husband and wife takes an unexpected turn into dangerously personal territory as American master Edward Albee offers a riveting new drama that expands on The Zoo Story, the one-act that launched his career 50 years ago. Tickets start at $40.
Arena Stage

Through April 10
An Ideal Husband
In Oscar Wilde's witty social commentary, Sir Robert Chiltern, a well-regarded politician living in wedded bliss (or so he supposes) with his morally upstanding wife, finds his comfortable life challenged when a past crime comes to light and threatens his status as the "ideal husband." Tickets start at $37.
The Shakespeare Theatre

April 13 to May 1
The New Electric Ballroom
Two middle-age sisters living together in a small Irish village are cajoled by their younger sister to tell and retell about their youth and the night that changed their lives (part of "New Ireland: The Enda Walsh Festival"). Tickets are $44 to $65.
The Studio Theatre

April 22 to June 5
Ruined
In war-torn Congo, Mama Nadi keeps the peace between customers on both sides of the civil war as she protects and profits from the women under her charge in this widely acclaimed play that tells an uncommonly human story with humor and song. Please call for ticket information.
Arena Stage

Through April 24
King Lear
The seventh installment of Synetic Theater's "Silent Shakespeare" series is a provocative modern take on one of the Bard's greatest tragedies, bringing lightness to this dark tale of a king's descent into madness. Tickets are $40 to $55.
Shakespeare Lansburgh Theatre

Tue., April 26, 6:30 p.m.
Poetry Slam in French
Mathieu Barcella, a French poet, songwriter and author, dazzles with his signature mix of song, prose and passion for performance — a spectacle that encourages audience to explore literary license. Tickets are $12.
Alliance Française de Washington

Through May 22
Art
Three friends debate the merits of a costly avant-garde painting, slowly shifting from the theoretical and artistic to the very private and personal, as their close friendship is put to the ultimate test in Yasmine Reza's scathing dark comedy. Tickets are $50 to $76.
Signature Theatre


TOURNAMENTS


Fri., May 6, 12 p.m.
Embassy Golf Tournament
The Washington Diplomat presents the 7th Annual Embassy Golf Tournament — this year under the diplomatic patronage of Canadian Ambassador Gary Doer — a popular day of golf and networking that includes a lunchtime cookout and post-tournament dinner reception with awards and prizes. For ticket information, visit www.washdiplomat.com.
Cross Creek Golf Club, Md.
 

 

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