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August 2011

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Cover Story

Slashing Global Poverty By Scrutinizing the Rich

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By Michael Coleman

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Georgia’s ‘Force of Nature’ Blows Into Washington

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By Larry Luxner

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Ukraine Marks Its Independence, But Critics Say It’s Backsliding

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By Larry Luxner

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Colombia Reaches Crossroads With Free Trade Agreement

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By Larry Luxner

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Colombia, Panama, South Korea Hold Out Hope for Elusive FTAs

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By Larry Luxner

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Innovating Public Diplomacy For a New Digital World

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By Jacob Comenetz

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‘Go-Between’ Examines How Eliasson Navigated Minefield of Mediation

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By John Shaw

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Legal Battle over Campus Protest Raises Questions of Free Speech, Islamophobia

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By Raymond Barrett

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Enzyme Inhibitor Offers Exciting New Option in Ovarian Cancer Treatment

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By Gina Shaw

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Space-Pioneered Ultrasound Technology Sparks Terrestrial Health Care Advances

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By Carolyn Cosmos

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‘Lens of National Geographic’ Captures Century of Mexico

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By Michael Coleman

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Couple of Natural Promoters for Trinidad and Tobago Get Down to Business

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By Gail Scott

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Reality and Fiction Collide in Fantastical Mexican Imagery

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By Gary Tischler

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Imperial Court Portraits Illuminate Chinese Golden Age

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By Jacob Comenetz

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From Lithographs to Guerilla Posters, a Thought-Provoking Ride

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By Gary Tischler

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The Queen Vic British Pub Adds Royal Fun to H Street

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By Rachel G. Hunt

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Coming of Age Amid Ravages of AIDS in ‘Life, Above All’

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By Ky N. Nguyen

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Annual ‘Nonfiction Nirvana’ Winners Offer Window Into World

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By Ky N. Nguyen

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Films - August 2011

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Languages

Cantonese
French
Sotho
Czech
German

English

Silent



Cantonese

 
La Comédie Humaine
(Yan gaan hei kat)
Directed by Chan Hing-kai and Janet Chun
(Hong Kong, 2010, 100 min.)
This high-energy buddy comedy stars Chapman To as Spring, a hit man from the mainland who falls ill while on assignment in Hong Kong and is nursed back to health by geeky screenwriter Soya.
Freer Gallery of Art
Fri., Aug. 5, 7 p.m.,
Sun., Aug. 7, 2 p.m.

Drunken Master
(Jui kuen)
Directed by Yuen Wo-ping
(Hong Kong, 1978, 110 min.)
The aimless Wong Fei-hung joins a fearsome martial arts master to learn the mysterious "drunken boxing" technique in the film that established Jackie Chan's career and serves as a perfect example of the martial arts movies that influenced hip-hop's pioneers.
Freer Gallery of Art
Fri., Aug. 19, 7 p.m.,
Sun., Aug. 21, 2 p.m.

Echoes of the Rainbow
(Sui yuet san tau)
Directed by Alex Law
(Hong Kong, 2009, 117 min.)
Working-class Hong Kong in the 1960s is seen through the eyes of 8-year-old "Big Ears," who witnesses the everyday trials and triumphs of a poor family.
Freer Gallery of Art
Fri., Aug. 12, 7 p.m.,
Sun., Aug. 14, 2 p.m.

Super Ninjas
Directed by Cheh Chang
(Hong Kong, 1982, 107 min.)
Watch as a Chinese kung fu family faces off against a squad of deadly ninjas — accompanied by the hard-hitting sounds of DJ IXL and DJ Excess of the Kolabz Crew, also known as Hop Fu, which take the hip-hop/kung fu connection to a whole new level.
Freer Gallery of Art
Sat., Aug. 20, 2 p.m.

Czech


Three Seasons in Hell

(Tri Sezóny v Pekle)
Directed by Tomás Masín
(Czech Republic/Germany/Slovakia, 2009, 110 min.)
A 19-year-old nonconformist poet living in 1947 Prague is blind to the Communist behemoth looking over him, and instead lives a bohemian life with sexually liberated girls writing lyrics for underground rock bands.
The Avalon Theatre
Wed., Aug. 10, 8 p.m.

English

5 Days of War
Directed by Renny Harlin
(U.S., 2011, 113 min.)
An American journalist, his cameraman and a Georgian native become caught in the crossfire of the five-day war between Russia and Georgia.
Theater TBA
Opens Fri., Aug. 19

The Adventures of Baron Munchausen
Directed by Terry Gilliam
(U.K./W. Germany, 1989, 126 min.)
Somewhere in the middle of Europe, circa 1740, an eccentric old man interrupts a performance of "The Adventures of Baron Munchausen" in the town square, claiming to be the real Baron Munchausen, the inveterate teller of tall tales and tide-turner of the Turkish invasion — and to prove it, he tells the story himself.
AFI Silver Theatre
Thu., Aug. 4, 7:30 p.m.

The Age of Stupid
Directed by Franny Armstrong
(U.K., 2009, 92 min.)
This unsparing look at the development of humanity against the background of global catastrophe poses the question: Why did we not prevent our doom while we still had the chance to do so? (Screens with other shorts as part of "Climate.Culture.Change" series.)
Goethe-Institut
Mon., Aug. 8, 6:30 p.m.

Another Earth
Directed by Mike Cahill
(U.S., 2011, 92 min.)
On the night of the discovery of a duplicate planet in the solar system, an ambitious young student and an accomplished composer cross paths in a tragic accident.
AFI Silver Theatre
Through Aug. 18

Attack the Block
Directed by Joe Cornish
(U.K., 2011, 88 min.)
A teen gang in South London defends its block from an alien invasion.
Theater TBA
Opens Fri., Aug. 19

A Better Life
Directed by Chris Weitz
(U.S., 2011, 97 min.)
A gardener in East L.A. struggles to keep his son away from gangs and immigration agents while trying to give his son the opportunities he never had. (English and Spanish)
Landmark's E Street Cinema

O Brother Where Art Thou?
Directed by Joel Coen
(U.K./France/U.S., 2000, 107 min.)
George Clooney mugs and charms his way through the Depression-era South, escaping from a chain gang with two fellow cons and circuitously making his way back to wife in a winking parody of Homer's "The Odyssey."
AFI Silver Theatre
Aug. 19 to 25

To Catch a Thief
Directed by Alfred Hitchcock
(U.S., 1955, 106 min.)
As jewel robberies proliferate in the South of France, police start to grow suspicious of former cat burglar Cary Grant's supposed "retirement," but he's more interested in fireworks over Cannes with fire-and-ice Grace Kelly.
AFI Silver Theatre
Fri. Aug. 5, 7:20 p.m.,
Sat., Aug. 6, 7:20 p.m.,
Sun., Aug. 7, 2:45 p.m.

Colombiana
Directed by Olivier Megaton
(U.S./France, 2011)
A young woman, after witnessing her parents' murder as a child in Bogota, grows up to be a stone-cold assassin. (English and Spanish)
Theater TBA
Opens Fri., Aug. 26

The Debt
Directed by John Madden
(U.S., 2010, 100 min.)
Three former Mossad agents are famous for the 1965 death of war criminal Max Rainer but 35 years later, a local European paper publishes an article that the criminal is alive and the agents, now in their late 60s, decide to complete the assignment they never did. (English, German and Hebrew)
The Avalon Theatre
Wed., Aug. 24, 8 p.m.

The Devil's Double
Directed by Lee Tamahori
In 1987 Baghdad, an Iraqi army lieutenant is thrust into the highest echelons of the "royal family" when he's ordered to become the body double to Saddam Hussein's son, the notorious "Black Prince" Uday Hussein, a reckless, sadistic party boy with a rabid hunger for sex and brutality.
Landmark's E Street Cinema
Opens Fri., Aug. 5

Don't Be Afraid of the Dark
Directed by Troy Nixey
(U.S./Australia/Mexico, 2010, 100 min.)
A young girl sent to live with her father and his new girlfriend discovers creatures in her new home who want to claim her as one of their own.
Theater TBA
Opens Fri., Aug. 26

Frenzy
Directed by Alfred Hitchcock
(U.K., 1972, 116 min.)
A down-on-his-luck ex-RAF pilot is on the run from accusations of being the Necktie Killer, while the chief inspector must contend with his wife's "gourmet" cooking during discussions of the case.
AFI Silver Theatre
Sat., Aug. 27, 2:45 p.m.,
Tue., Aug. 30, 7 p.m.

The Future
Directed by Miranda July
(Germany/U.S., 2011, 91 min.)
When a couple decides to adopt a stray cat, their perspective on life radically changes, literally altering the course of time and space and testing their faith in each other and themselves.
Landmark's E Street Cinema
Opens Fri., Aug. 5

The Guard
Directed by John Michael McDonagh
(Ireland, 2011, 96 min.)
An unorthodox Irish policeman with a confrontational personality is teamed up with an uptight FBI agent to investigate an international drug-smuggling ring.
Landmark's E Street Cinema
Opens Fri., Aug. 12

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2
Directed by David Yates
(U.S./U.K., 2011, 130 min.)
In the epic finale, the battle between the good and evil forces of the wizarding world escalates into an all-out war. But it is Harry Potter who may be called upon to make the ultimate sacrifice as he draws closer to the climactic showdown with Lord Voldemort.
Area theaters

Highlander
Directed by Russell Mulcahy
(U.S./U.K., 1986, 116 min.)
Dealt a deadly blow while defending his Scottish clan from the marauding, unkillable Kurgan, Connor MacLeod miraculously returns to life, wandering the heath until he encounters a centuries-old Spanish swordsman (Sean Connery), who, like MacLeod, is a born immortal.
AFI Silver Theatre
Aug. 27 to Sept. 1

How to Live Forever
Directed by Mark Wexler
(U.S., 2009, 94 min.)
Baby boomer Mark Wexler travels the world from Okinawa to Iceland to Las Vegas searching for the secrets of long life.
Landmark's E Street Cinema

Lifeforce
Directed by Tobe Hooper
(U.K., 1985, 116 min.)
A space shuttle's rendezvous with Halley's Comet reveals an alien spacecraft containing hundreds of humanoid creatures who come to life on Earth and begin draining the life force of human victims, turning them into vampire zombies, in this big-budget bomb — and camp masterpiece.
AFI Silver Theatre
Fri., Aug. 26, 11 p.m.,
Sat., Aug. 27, 11 p.m.

The Man Who Fell to Earth
Directed by Nicolas Roeg
(U.K., 1976, 139 min.)
In this uncut 35th anniversary release, space oddity David Bowie lands on 20th-century Earth seeking water for his drought-stricken planet but instead uses his highly advanced technology to become a wealthy industrialist who succumbs to American decadence in the form of TV, booze, sex and stock issues.
Landmark's E Street Cinema

Midnight in Paris
Directed by Woody Allen
(Spain/U.S., 2011, 94 min.)
Traveling to the French capital for business with their family, a young engaged couple is forced to confront the illusion that a life different from their own is better.
AFI Silver Theatre
Through Aug. 18

Miller's Crossing
Directed by Joel Coen
(U.S., 1990, 115 min.)
In the Coen brothers' ripping yarn of 1930s gang warfare, Italian mob boss Jon Polito wants to rub out Jewish gambler John Turturro, but he's protected by Irish godfather Albert Finney, who's sweet on Turturro's sister.
AFI Silver Theatre
Sat., Aug. 6, 5 p.m.,
Sun., Aug. 7, 5 p.m.

The Pink Panther Strikes Again
Directed by Blake Edwards
(U.S., 1976, 103 min.)
Inspector Dreyfus has recovered from the Clouseau-induced psychosis of the previous film, until he's informed that the bumbling French inspector has replaced him as head inspector, driving Dreyfus over the edge.
AFI Silver Theatre
Fri., Aug. 5, 5:10 p.m.,
Sat., Aug. 6, 12:40 p.m.,
Sun., Aug. 7, 12:30 p.m.

Project Nim
Directed by James Marsh
(U.K., 2011, 93 min.)
In the 1970s, Nim the chimpanzee becomes the focus of a landmark experiment to show that an ape could learn to communicate with language if raised and nurtured like a human child. What we learn about his true nature, and our own, is comic, revealing and profoundly unsettling.
Landmark's E Street Cinema

Secret Ceremony
Directed by Joseph Losey
(U.K., 1968, 109 min.)
Prostitute Elizabeth Taylor forms a surrogate mother-daughter bond with strangely childlike Mia Farrow, who resembles her dead daughter.
AFI Silver Theatre
Sun., Aug. 21, 5:15 p.m.,
Mon., Aug. 22, 7 p.m.

A Shot in the Dark
Directed by Blake Edwards
(U.S./U.K., 1964, 102 min.)
The bumbling Inspector Clouseau (Peter Sellers) investigates a series of murders in which every clue points to the maid, but ever oblivious, Clouseau distrusts everyone except the obvious suspect.
AFI Silver Theatre
Mon., Aug. 1, 7 p.m.,
Thu., Aug. 4, 5:30 p.m.

The Smurfs
Directed by Raja Gosnell
(U.S., 2011, 86 min.)
When the evil wizard Gargamel chases the tiny blue Smurfs out of their village, they tumble from their magical world and into ours — smack dab in the middle of Central Park.
Area theaters

Snow Flower and the Secret Fan
Directed by Wayne Wang
(U.S./China, 2011, 104 min.)
In 19th-century China, 7-year-old girls Snow Flower and Lily are matched as laotong — or "old sames" — bound together for eternity. In present-day Shanghai, the laotongs' descendants, Nina and Sophia, struggle to maintain the intimacy of their own childhood friendship in the face of modern demands. What unfolds are two stories, generations apart, united by the everlasting notion of love, hope and friendship.
Landmark's E Street Cinema

Tabloid
Directed by Errol Morris
(U.S., 2010, 87 min.)
Thirty years before the antics of Lindsay Lohan and Britney Spears were gossip fodder, Miss Wyoming Joyce McKinney made her mark as a tabloid staple with her single-minded devotion to the man of her dreams, which led her on a surreal global journey all the way to a cloning laboratory in Seoul, South Korea.
Landmark's E Street Cinema

The Taming of the Shrew
Directed by Franco Zeffirelli
(Italy/U.S., 1967, 122 min.)
The splashy star casting of real-life husband and wife Richard Burton and Elizabeth Taylor as Shakespeare's famously bickering couple Petruchio and Kate made Franco Zeffirelli's debut film a major international hit.
AFI Silver Theater
Sun., Aug. 14, 12:20 p.m.,
Wed., Aug. 17, 6:30 p.m.

Topaz
Directed by Alfred Hitchcock
(U.S., 1969, 127 min.)
Informed by a Soviet defector of secret shipments to Cuba, CIA man John Forsythe asks French agent Frederick Stafford to be his man in Havana.
AFI Silver Theatre
Sun., Aug. 21, 12:20 p.m.,
Tue., Aug. 23, 6:45 p.m.

Torn Curtain
Directed by Alfred Hitchcock
(U.S., 1966, 128 min.)
In this Cold War thriller from Alfred Hitchcock, Paul Newman plays a rocket scientist on assignment in East Germany, while his fiancée Julie Andrews, shedding her Mary Poppins image, is inadvertently drawn into the web of intrigue and danger.
AFI Silver Theatre
Sat., Aug. 20, 12:20 p.m.,
Mon., Aug. 22, 4:30 p.m.

The Tree
Directed by Julie Bertucelli
(France/Australia/Germany/Italy, 2010, 100 min.)
Blindsided with anguish after her husband's sudden death, Dawn — along with her four young children — struggles to make sense of life without him against the mystical backdrop of the Australian countryside.
Landmark's E Street Cinema

If a Tree Falls: A Story of the Earth Liberation Front
Directed by Marshall Curry and Sam Cullman
(U.S./U.K., 2011, 85 min.)
Part coming-of-age tale, part cops-and-robbers thriller, this film offers a rare behind-the-scenes look at the Earth Liberation Front, the radical environmental group that the FBI calls America's "number-one domestic terrorist threat."
Landmark's E Street Cinema
Opens Fri., Aug. 12

The Whistleblower
Directed by Larysa Kondracki
(Germany/Canada, 2010, 118 min.)
In this political thriller inspired by actual events, an American police officer who becomes a peacekeeper in post-war Bosnia uncovers a dangerous web of corruption and cover-up in a world of private contractors and multinational diplomatic doubletalk.
Landmark's E Street Cinema
Opens Fri., Aug. 5


French


L'Arpète
Directed by Donatien for Franco-Film
(France, 1929, 97 min.)
To save her boss (the couturier Pommier), Jacqueline dupes a rich patron (the visiting American art lover Rochedufer) into placing a huge order, but Rochedufer trumps her by asking for a rendezvous, which leads to surprising revelations. (Screens with "Le Chapeau de Madame" (France, 1907, 7 min.))
National Gallery of Art
Sat., Aug. 6, 2 p.m.

Le Manoir de la Peur
Directed by Alfred Machin and Henry Wulschleger
(France, 1927, 72 min.)
Fear strikes Provençal villagers when a crime wave ensues just after a mysterious stranger and his valet move into a nearby country home. (Screens with "La Main" (France, 1920, 19 min.))
National Gallery of Art
Sun., Aug. 7, 4:30 p.m.

The Names of Love
(Le Nom des Gens)
Directed by Michel Leclerc
(France, 2010, 102 min.)
A young, extroverted left-wing activist who sleeps with her political opponents to convert them to her cause is successful until she meets her match in a Jewish, middle-age, middle-of-the road scientist. (French, English, Greek and Arabic)
Landmark's E Street Cinema
Opens Fri., Aug. 12

Point Blank
(À Bout Portant)
Directed by Fred Cavayé
(France, 2010, 90 min.)
Samuel Pierret is a nurse who saves the wrong guy — a thief whose henchmen take Samuel's pregnant wife hostage to force him to spring their boss from the hospital.
Landmark's E Street Cinema
Opens Fri., Aug. 5

Sarah's Key
(Elle S'Appelait Sarah)
Directed by Gilles Paquet-Brenner
(France, 2010, 101 min.)
In modern-day Paris, a journalist finds her life becoming entwined with a young girl whose family was torn apart during the Nazi's notorious Vel'd'Hiv Roundup in 1942. (French, English, Italian and German)
Landmark's E Street Cinema


German


 Above Water
(Über Wasser)
Directed by Udo Maurer
(Austria/Luxembourg, 2007, 82 min.)
From different parts of earth, the film reports on the existential significance of water, demonstrating that climate change will dramatically affect regions that contributed little to the problem. (Screens with other shorts as part of "Climate.Culture.Change" series.)
Goethe-Institut
Mon., Aug. 29, 6:30 p.m.

Das Boot
Directed by Wolfgang Petersen
(W. Germany, 1981, 149 min.)
At the height of World War II, a young submarine crew heads out to sea on a top-secret mission that all but ensures most will never make it home alive, as they attempt impossible wartime feats while also trying to understand the ideology of the government they serve. (German, English and French)
The Avalon Theatre
Sun., Aug. 28, time TBA

People – Dreams – Actions
(Menschen – Träume – Taten)
Directed by Andreas Stiglmayr
(Germany, 2007, 90 min.)
An ecological model settlement called "Seven Linden Trees" in Altmark, Germany, becomes a microcosm that vividly reflects the problems of society at large. (Screens with other shorts as part of "Climate.Culture.Change" series.)
Goethe-Institut
Mon., Aug. 22, 6:30 p.m.
 

Silent


Algol – Tragedy of Power
(Algol – Tragödie der Macht)
Directed by Hans Wreckmeister
(Germany, 1920, 120 min.)
A human who is given a prototype machine by an inhabitant of the planet Algol that if used, would allow him to rule the earth. The protagonist's faith in progress expresses a fundamental cause of climate change. (Screens with "The Bill – Die Rechnung" (Germany, 2009, 4 min.) as part of "Climate.Culture.Change" series.)
Goethe-Institut
Mon., Aug. 15, 6:30 p.m.
 

Sotho

Life, Above All
Directed by Oliver Schmitz
(South Africa/Germany, 2010, 106 min.)
A daughter's loyalty to her mother drives this touching coming-of-age story set against the backdrop of modern South Africa.
Landmark's E Street Cinema
Opens Fri., Aug. 5

   

Events - August 2011

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EVENT CATEGORIES

Art Music Theater


ART


Through Aug. 12
Stefan Zweig – An Austrian from Europe
In 1992, the city of Salzburg honored well-known writer and political observer Stefan Zweig with an exhibition commemorating the 50th anniversary of his death — a retrospective that now comes to Washington with more than 120 photographs and numerous reproductions and other documents on his life. Admission is free but registration is required and can be made at www.acfdc.org/events-registration.
Embassy of Austria

Through Aug. 13
The Last Full Measure: Civil War Photos from the Liljenquist Family Collection
Portrait photographs of the young men who fought and died in the American Civil War serve as a memorial to those who gave their lives during the devastating conflict, displaying the faces of 360 Union soldiers — one for every 1,000 who died — and 52 Confederate soldiers, one for every 5,000.
Library of Congress
Thomas Jefferson Building

Through Aug. 14
Charles Sandison: Rage, love, hope, and despair
This mesmerizing digital projection by Scottish-born artist Charles Sandison uses computer technology and color-coded words to represent different emotions, states of being, and patterns of human behavior.
Corcoran Gallery of Art

Through Aug. 14
Mads Gamdrup: Renunciation
In a series of 16 spectacular, large-scale color photographs, Danish artist Mads Gamdrup explores the desert as a place of unexpected promise, highlighting empty landscapes in the United States, Iceland, Egypt and Morocco.
Corcoran Gallery of Art

Through Aug. 14
E • CO
River degradation. Torrential rains in Brazil. The consequences of nuclear power in Eastern Europe. Environmental issues are captured by professional photographers from across Latin America and Europe in a body of work first shown in Spain to highlight professional photographers' challenges in the rapidly evolving digital media landscape.
American University Katzen Arts Center

Through Aug. 14
Registro 02
Is a work of art defined by the artist's intent and methods, or do the people viewing it help define the work through their perceptions of it? Encompassing the works of four individual artists and one collective, this exhibit sets out to show that both the artistic process and the audience's perception help inform art's meaning.
American University Katzen Arts Center

Through Aug. 14
Washington Color and Light
Artists associated with the Washington Color School and their contemporaries were united by an exploration of the language of abstraction, a desire to experiment with materials, and a love of color. This exhibition reveals the artistic innovations and individual approaches that shaped new directions in abstract painting and sculpture from the 1950s to the late 1970s.
Corcoran Gallery of Art

Through Aug. 20
Women by Women
This group exhibition of work by five women artists portraying women explores conceptions of femininity.
Heiner Contemporary Gallery

Through Aug. 21
Race to the End of the Earth
A century ago, two teams led by Britain's Robert F. Scott and Norway's Roald Amundsen braved starvation and Antarctica's frozen environment in a race to be first to the South Pole. An array of breathtaking photographs, historic artifacts and interactive exhibits recount this true-life adventure tale while examining classic and modern methods of polar travel, science and technology — as well as the human instinct to explore our world.
National Geographic Society

Through Aug. 28
Fragments in Time and Space
Fragments in Time and Space draws primarily on the Hirshhorn's collection to present works by artists such as Tacita Dean, Thomas Eakins, Douglas Gordon, Ed Ruscha and Hiroshi Sugimoto, encouraging viewers to reconsider the way they perceive and experience the world — from a single moment in time to an idea of the infinite.
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden

Through Aug. 28
Possible Worlds: Mexican Photography and Fiction in Contemporary Art
The artists of "Possible Worlds" are part of a new generation of photographers who break away from traditional photojournalism and offer imaginative, alternative ways of documenting the natural world, influenced by film, literature, fantasy, science fiction and electronic music.
Organization of American States
Art Museum of the Americas

Through Sept. 2
gute aussichten: young German photography 2010/2011
Works by eight winners of gute aussichten, the seventh annual German competition for graduate photography students, come to Washington on the exhibition's worldwide tour.
The Goethe-Institut

Through Sept. 3
Fame, Fortune, and Theft: The Shakespeare First Folio
This exhibition traces the global history of Shakespeare's First Folio, the first published collection of the Bard's plays, depicting the ways in which this single book influenced the industries of conservation and book-collecting from the 1620s through the 21st century, eventually becoming a cause for idolatry in itself.
Folger Shakespeare Library

Through Sept. 4
Kandinsky and the Harmony of Silence: Painting with White Border
After a visit to his native Moscow, Vasily Kandinsky recorded his "extremely powerful impressions" in his 1913 masterpiece, "Painting with White Border," which, for this exhibition, is reunited with more than 12 preparatory studies from international collections, including the Phillips's oil sketch, and compared with other closely related works.
The Phillips Collection

Through Sept. 4
Stella Sounds: The Scarlatti K Series
For the first time in a museum exhibition, the Phillips Collection presents recent works from Frank Stella's "K "series inspired by the 18th-century composer Domenico Scarlatti's harpsichord sonatas.
The Phillips Collection

Through Sept. 5
The Capitoline Venus
The "Capitoline Venus" — on loan to the United States for the first time — is one of the best-preserved and most famous masterpieces from Roman antiquity.
National Gallery of Art

Through Sept. 30
Democratic Principles
This exhibit of 22 portraits by Elizabeth McClancy represent contemporary progressive political leaders in ways that reveal the magnitude of the challenges they face and the leadership they must assume. A special panel discussion on June 8 at 7 p.m. features Howard Dean and will discuss the next of the arts in democratic development. For information, visit www.democraticwoman.org.
The Woman's National Democratic Club

Through Oct. 2
The Guerrilla Girls Talk Back
The Guerrilla Girls, a group of anonymous artist-activists, critique the sexism and racism pervading contemporary culture through their populist art production, which includes posters, books and live performances in which they wear gorilla masks.
National Museum of Women in the Arts

Through Oct. 2
Pressing Ideas: Fifty Years of Women's Lithographs from Tamarind
Featuring 75 works by 42 artists including Elaine de Kooning, Louise Nevelson, Margo Humphrey, Jaune Quick-To-See Smith and Kiki Smith, "Pressing Ideas" explores the breadth of experimentation in lithography and women's contributions to a workshop that stretches creative boundaries.
National Museum of Women in the Arts

Through Oct. 2
Left Behind: Selected Gifts from the Heather and Tony Podesta Collection
Featuring photographs of unpopulated spaces in which a human presence is not evident but implied, this exhibition celebrates recent gifts from the Podestas to the Phillips.
The Phillips Collection

Through Oct. 2
In the Tower: Nam June Paik
A new exhibition featuring 20 works by groundbreaking contemporary artist Nam June Paik (1923–2006) is the third in a series of shows installed in the Tower Gallery that centers on developments in art since the midcentury.
National Gallery of Art

Through Oct. 9
NASA / ART: 50 Years of Exploration
More than 70 pieces of art — from the illustrative to the abstract — offer a look at the works commissioned by the NASA Art Program, which was established soon after the inception of the U.S. space program in 1958 as a way to communicate the accomplishments, setbacks and sheer excitement of space exploration over the past five decades to the public.
National Air and Space Museum

Through Oct. 22
Mexico Through the Lens of National Geographic
With more than 150 articles, no country has seen more coverage in National Geographic magazine than Mexico, generating a stunning archive of visual imagery documenting the country's culture, history and physical beauty — a slice of which can be seen in this selection of 132 photographs drawn from the National Geographic's archives.
Mexican Cultural Institute

Through Oct. 23
Chris Martin: Painting Big
Chris Martin's large-scale abstract paintings are tactile and stitched-together, incorporating found objects and collage into their abstract geometries and rhythmic patterns and relating as much to the physical world as to his own memories and experiences.
Corcoran Gallery of Art

Through Oct. 28
Publishing Modernism: The Bauhaus in Print
How is it that an art school that was open for a mere 14 years — during which time it suffered chronic financial shortfalls, survived a turbulent political situation, claimed just 33 faculty members, and graduated only about 1,250 students — came to have such a lasting impression on modern design and art education? Despite these difficulties, the Bauhaus did precisely that.
National Gallery of Art

Through Nov. 6
Perspectives: Hale Tiger
Multimedia artist Hale Tenger, born in Izmir, Turkey, creates videos and installations that examine the tangible and intangible traces of events, filming the façade of the St. George Hotel in Beirut — the site of the assassination of Rafik Hariri, former prime minister of Lebanon — while it was being renovated from 2005 to 2007.
Arthur M. Sackler Gallery

Through Nov. 27
The Gothic Spirit of John Taylor Arms
John Taylor Arms (1887–1953), an American printmaker, believed in the uplifting quality of Gothic art and the power of close observation, skillfully transcribed. This exhibition presents selected examples from the artist's entire career, from his early New York works to his finest images of European cathedrals.
National Gallery of Art

Through Nov. 27
Italian Master Drawings from the Wolfgang Ratjen Collection: 1525-1835
The splendors of Italian draftsmanship from the late Renaissance to the height of the neoclassical movement are showcased in an exhibition of 65 superb drawings assembled by the European private collector Wolfgang Ratjen (1943–97).
National Gallery of Art

MUSIC

Fri., Aug. 5, 8:30 p.m.
NSO at Wolf Trap: Tan Dun - Martial Arts Trilogy
Composer Tan Dun leads the National Symphony Orchestra (NSO) in the "Martial Arts Trilogy," featuring three concertos based on his film scores for "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon," "The Banquet" and "Hero." Tickets are $20 to $52.
Wolf Trap

Thu., Aug. 11, 7:30 p.m.
Oktet9
Eight young men touring the world as part of the Slovenian a capella choir group Oktet9 come to Washington for a special pre-season event on behalf of the Embassy Series. Tickets are $30, including a wine and cheese reception, and can be purchased at www.embassyseries.org.
Embassy of Slovenia

THEATER

Aug. 4 to 27
Uncle Vanya
The Sydney Theatre Company returns with an exclusive U.S. engagement of Andrew Upton's new adaptation of "Uncle Vanya," starring Cate Blanchett in the classic tragicomedy by Anton Chekhov that lays bare the fruitlessness of human endeavor with warmth, humor and insight. Tickets are $59 to $120.
Kennedy Center Eisenhower Theater

Through Aug. 7
POP!
Who shot Andy Warhol? This musical murder-mystery extravaganza recreates the freewheeling, adrenaline-driven atmosphere of Warhol's infamous Factory, complete with a cast of colorful characters — and suspects. Tickets are $38 to $43.
The Studio Theatre

Sat., Aug. 13, 7 p.m.
La Familia Lobato & Young and Corrupted
Participants of GALA Theatre's Paso Nuevo and Summer Youth Program are proud to present two new and original productions: "La Familia Lobato," a bilingual play exploring the intricacies of family relations and cultural identity, and "Young and Corrupted," a series of new monologues, scenes, songs and other pieces. Admission is free.
GALA Hispanic Theatre

Through Aug. 14
Clybourne Park
In the 1950s, a white community in Chicago splinters over the black family about to move into their neighborhood. Fast forward to present day and that same house now represents very different demographics, as neighbors pitch a horrifying yet hilarious battle over territory and legacy that reveals how far our ideas about race and gentrification have evolved — or have they? Tickets start at $45.
Woolly Mammoth Theater Company

Through Aug. 14
The Importance of Being Ernest
SCENA Theatre offers a gender-bending take on Oscar Wilde's timeless tale of class and marriage that both revels in and mocks the "double life" created by protagonist Jack as "his" alter ego indulges in pleasure outside of British society's mores. Tickets are $27 to $40.
H Street Playhouse

Aug. 18 to Sept. 4
Julius Caesar
The Shakespeare Theatre Company's annual "Free For All," a much-loved Washington tradition that has offered free performances to the public for the past 20 years, kicks off the company's 25th anniversary season with a revival of its acclaimed production of "Julius Caesar" and his famed life-and-death struggle for power in Rome.
Sidney Harman Hall

Through Aug. 21
Wicked
Long before that girl from Kansas arrives in Munchkinland, two girls meet in the land of Oz — one is smart, fiery and green, literally, while the other is beautiful, ambitious and very popular. How these two grow to become the Wicked Witch of the West and Glinda the Good makes for what the New York Times calls "the defining musical of the decade." Tickets are $37 to $250.
Kennedy Center Opera House

Aug. 25 to Oct. 16
The Boy Detective Fails
In the twilight of a childhood full of wonder, a Billy the "boy detective" faces a mystery he can't comprehend: the shocking death of his young sister and crime-solving partner Caroline. Ten years later, a 30-year-old Billy returns to his quiet New Jersey town after an extended stay at St. Vitus' Hospital for the mentally ill determined to right old wrongs. Call for ticket information.
Signature Theatre

Through Oct. 2
Oklahoma!
The best-selling show in Arena Stage's 60-year history is back for 12 weeks. Inspired by the toughness of the prairie, Artistic Director Molly Smith sets her production in the robust world of territory life filled with a cast as rich and complex as the great tapestry of America itself, set against the backdrop of Rodgers and Hammerstein's timeless music. Please call for ticket details.
Arena Stage

 

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