January 2015

diplomat.cover.germany.jan15.digital

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Cover Story

New Cold War on the Horizon?
Not Likely, Says German Envoy

a5.cover.germany.wittig.homeAs Germany marked the 25th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall and the demise of Soviet communism, it also found itself casting a wary eye toward a resurgent Russia. Read More 

People of World Influence

Lagon Fights for Human Rights
As New Head of Freedom House

a1.powi.lagon.homeMark P. Lagon, a former State Department official with a long record in the fight against human trafficking, starts a new job as president of Freedom House this month. Read More


Saudi Extremism

Islamic State's Rise Revives
Old Strains in U.S.-Saudi Ties

a2.saudi.pilgrim.masjid.haram.homeThe United States and Saudi Arabia have both set their sights on the Islamic State, but the two erstwhile allies have very different visions for Syria and the larger Middle East. Read More


Latvia Takes Helm

Latvia Takes Over EU Presidency
Amid Fears of Russian Aggression

a3.latvia.razans.riga.homeLike the other Baltics, Latvia has a tortured history with its big neighbor to the east — echoes of which it fears are being resurrected as Russia throws it weight around in Ukraine. Read More


Disaster Differences

Haiti, Indonesia, Philippines Mark
Solemn Disaster Anniversaries

a4.disasters.tsunami.homeIndonesia, Haiti and the Philippines are all marking the anniversaries of wrenching disasters that offer important, and distinct, lessons for overcoming tragedy. Read More


Adoption Hurdles

Americans Hoping to Adopt Abroad
Need Plenty of Patience, Persistence

a6.adoptions.bear.homeFor Americans wanting to adopt a foreign child, patience and persistence are the key to navigating an increasingly unpredictable process. Read More


Medical

Hyperthyroidism:
Too Much of a Good Thing

a7.medical.hyperthyroid.homeHyperthyroidism causes your thyroid, and your metabolism, to go into overdrive — which is a particularly dangerous condition for pregnant women. Read More

   

Lagon Fights for Human Rights As New Head of Freedom House

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

By Michael Coleman

Read more: Lagon Fights for Human Rights As New Head of Freedom House
   

Islamic State’s Rise Revives Old Strains in U.S.-Saudi Ties

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

By Sean Lyngaas

Read more: Islamic State’s Rise Revives Old Strains in U.S.-Saudi Ties
   

Latvia Takes Over EU Presidency Amid Fears of Russian Aggression

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

By Larry Luxner

Read more: Latvia Takes Over EU Presidency Amid Fears of Russian Aggression
   

Haiti, Indonesia, Philippines Mark Solemn Disaster Anniversaries

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

By Larry Luxner

Read more: Haiti, Indonesia, Philippines Mark Solemn Disaster Anniversaries
   

New Cold War on the Horizon? Not Likely, Says German Envoy

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

By Larry Luxner

Read more: New Cold War on the Horizon? Not Likely, Says German Envoy
   

Americans Hoping to Adopt Abroad Need Plenty of Patience, Persistence

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

By Martin Austermuhle

Read more: Americans Hoping to Adopt Abroad Need Plenty of Patience, Persistence
   

Hyperthyroidism: Too Much of a Good Thing

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

By Gina Shaw

Read more: Hyperthyroidism: Too Much of a Good Thing
   

French, U.S. School Officials Team Up for Healthy Eating

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

By Sarah Alaoui

Read more: French, U.S. School Officials Team Up for Healthy Eating
   

Maltese Official Raises Profile Of U.K. Diplomacy Academy

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

By Larry Luxner

Read more: Maltese Official Raises Profile Of U.K. Diplomacy Academy
   

Little Extras Go Long Way To Help Hotels Stand Out

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

By Stephanie Kanowitz

Read more: Little Extras Go Long Way To Help Hotels Stand Out
   

‘The Traveler’s Eye’ Memorializes a Continent’s Worth of Journeys

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

By Vanessa H. Larson

Read more: ‘The Traveler’s Eye’ Memorializes a Continent’s Worth of Journeys
   

Moroccan Wife’s Devotes Time to Nonprofit, Nursing, Insurance

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

By Gail Scott

Read more: Moroccan Wife’s Devotes Time to Nonprofit, Nursing, Insurance
   

Swiss Photographer Presents Nuanced Portrait of Victims

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

By Sarah Alaoui

Read more: Swiss Photographer Presents Nuanced Portrait of Victims
   

Persian Calligraphy, Culture Showcased Through Nasta’liq Script

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

By Sarah Alaoui

Read more: Persian Calligraphy, Culture Showcased Through Nasta’liq Script
   

Trabocchi at Home in Latest Italian Creation, Casa Luca

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

By Rachel G. Hunt

Read more: Trabocchi at Home in Latest Italian Creation, Casa Luca
   

Turkish Auteur Ceylan at Top of His Game With Latest Character Study

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

By Ky N. Nguyen

Read more: Turkish Auteur Ceylan at Top of His Game With Latest Character Study
   

Films - January 2015

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

By Cari

Languages

English

Italian


Farsi

Portuguese


Georgian

Russian

Hebrew

Swedish

English

 Afternoon of a Faun: Tanaquil Le Clercq

Directed by Nancy Buirski

(U.S., 2014, 91 min.)

The story of prima ballerina Tanaquil Le Clercq is an epic tale of genius, grace, doubt and ultimate tragedy. Arguably the greatest American dancer of the 20th century (and muse to both Jerome Robbins and George Balanchine), she fell victim to polio in her late 20s.

National Gallery of Art

Sun., Jan. 4, 11 a.m. and 4 p.m.,

Sun., Jan. 11, 11 a.m. and 4 p.m.


The Imitation Game

Directed by Morten Tyldum

(U.K./U.S., 2014, 114 min.)

During the winter of 1952, British authorities entered the home of mathematician, cryptanalyst and war hero Alan Turing (Benedict Cumberbatch, in a stirring performance) to investigate a reported burglary. They instead ended up arresting Turing himself on charges of "gross indecency," unwittingly incriminating the pioneer of modern-day computing.

AFI Silver Theatre

Dec. 25 to Jan. 15


Joachim Prinz: I Shall Not Be Silent

Directed by Rachel Eskin Fisher and Rachel Nierenberg Pasternak

(U.S., 2014, 57 min.)

Footage, archival recordings, interviews with notable contemporaries and family members create a captivating and moving portrait of Joachim Prinz, one of the most outspoken rabbis living under the Nazi regime who went on to become a leading American civil rights activist.

Washington DCJCC

Tue., Jan. 20, 7:30 p.m.


Moana: Restoration with Sound

Directed by Monica and Robert Flaherty

(U.S., 1926/2014, 98 min.)

In 1924, American filmmaker Robert Flaherty journeyed to the Samoan island of Savai'i encumbered with several tons of filmmaking gear to make "Moana," a narrative film about the island's way of life. Fifty years later, Flaherty's youngest daughter Monica, who had traveled with him to Savai'i on the first trip, returned there to record local ambient sounds and traditional songs.

National Gallery of Art

Wed., Jan. 14, 7 p.m.


Paddington

Directed by Paul King

(U.K./France, 2014, 95 min.)

A young English boy befriends a talking bear he finds at a London train station in this live-action feature based on the series of popular children's books by Michael Bond.

Area theaters

Opens Fri., Jan. 16


The Woman in Black 2

Directed by Tom Harper

(U.K., 2014)

Forty years after the first haunting at Eel Marsh House, a group of children evacuated from WWII London arrive, awakening the house's darkest inhabitant.

Area theaters

Opens Fri., Jan. 2

Farsi

 Bending the Rules

Directed by Behnam Behzadi

(Iran, 2013, 94 min.)

An amateur theater troupe that has been invited to perform outside Iran. Most of its young members have lied to their families about where they are going, but when the lead actress tells her father the truth, he forbids her to leave. On the eve of their departure, she and her cohorts struggle with whether to confront or secretly defy him.

Freer Gallery of Art

Fri., Jan. 30, 7 p.m.

Sun., Feb. 1, 2 p.m.


Fish & Cat

(Mahi va gorbeh)

Directed by Shahram Mokri

(Iran, 2013, 134 min.)

Based on a true story about a rural Iranian restaurant that served human flesh, the film's premise has the makings of a Hollywood horror movie, as a group of college students set up camp at a remote lake for the annual kite festival, where, unbeknownst to them, the owners of the only nearby eatery are sizing them up as both customers and potential ingredients — but this is no slasher flick.

Freer Gallery of Art

Fri., Jan. 16, 7 p.m.,

Sun., Jan. 18, 2 p.m.


Manuscripts Don't Burn

(Dast-neveshtehaa nemisoosand)

Directed by Mohammad Rasoulof

(Iran, 2013, 125 min.)

Made in defiance of a 20-year ban on filmmaking, this incendiary thriller by Mohammad Rasoulof was inspired by the Iranian government's attempt to murder several prominent writers and intellectuals in 1995, delivering a bold indictment of Iran's brutal and secretive security apparatus.

Freer Gallery of Art

Fri., Jan. 9, 7 p.m.,

Sun., Jan. 11, 2 p.m.


What's the Time in Your World?

(Dar donya ye to saat chand ast?)

Directed by Safi Yazdanian

(Iran, 2014, 101 min.)

The brilliant Leila Hatami stars as a woman who, on a whim, returns to Iran after living in France for two decades. Upon arriving in her hometown of Rasht, she meets a frame-maker who claims to know her well, but of whom she has no recollection.

Freer Gallery of Art

Fri., Jan. 23, 7 p.m.,

Sat., Jan. 24, 2 p.m.

Georgian

In Bloom

(Grzeli nateli dgeebi)

Directed by Nana Ekvtimishvili and Simon Gross

(Georgia, 2014, 162 min.)

Set in Georgia in the early 1990s, during a time of political turbulence, hardship, breadlines, boredom and casual violence, a boy gives a gun to 14-year-old Natia, who, along with her best friend Eka, make the best of circumstances in which choices are limited, particularly for young women (screens with "Waiting for Mum (Deda)" (Georgia, 2011, 8 min.)).

Goethe-Institut

Tue., Jan. 27, 6:30 p.m.


Blue Mountains aka An Unbelievable Story

(Tsisperi mtebi aka Daujerebeli ambavil/ Golubye gory)

Directed by Eldar Shengelaia

(U.S.S.R., 1984, 97 min.)

An inspired satire by one of Georgia's leading directors, "Blue Mountains" is a disarming and cleverly precise critique of bureaucracy as stifling stasis, set in a publishing house in Tbilisi. There, a writer and his manuscript submission are all but ignored as the employees, a colorful cast of characters, carry on with their private affairs and outside interests, oblivious to his needs.

Goethe-Institut

Mon., Jan. 12, 6:30 p.m.


Bakhmaro

Directed by Salomé Jashi

(Georgia, 2011, 58 min.)

The title suggests a film about this famous tourist paradise in the mountains of Georgia. The story, however, takes place in locales off the beaten track, like the ornate restaurant where the principal patrons are a tired dog and a handful of immigrants (screens with "Felicità").

Goethe-Institut

Mon., Jan. 26, 6:30 p.m.

Felicità

Directed by Salomé Alexi

(Georgia, 2009, 30 min.)

Tamara lives and works in Italy, but when her husband in Georgia dies in a car accident, Tamara's illegal status doesn't allow her to leave Italy to attend his funeral, so she participates via a long-distance cellular call (screens with "Bakhmaro").

Goethe-Institut

Mon., Jan. 26, 6:30 p.m.


The Machine Which Makes Everything Disappear

(Manqana, romelic kvelafers gaaqrobs)

Directed by Tinatin Gurchiani

(Georgia/Germany, 2012, 101 min.)

A film director organizes a casting call for 15- to 23-year-olds, and the results form the basis for a revealing portrait of Georgian society. Interview footage with the youths is combined with vérité segments of the subjects in their daily lives.

Goethe-Institut

Thu., Jan. 29, 6:30 p.m.


The White Caravan

(Tetri karavani/ Belyy karavan)

Directed by Eldar Shengelaya and Tamaz Meliava

(U.S.S.R., 1964, 97 min.)

Martia, an experienced shepherd, is moving his herd to the winter pastures. But the life of shepherds is mundane and complex to the extent that even a minor mistake is fraught with serious consequences (Georgian and Russian).

Goethe-Institut

Tue., Jan. 13, 6:30 p.m.

Hebrew

A Place in Heaven

Directed by Yossi Madmony

(Israel, 2013, 117 min.)

This quasi-Biblical, epic drama spans the history of Israel through 40 years and three wars, yet, like Yossi Madmony's previous film "Restoration," at its heart it is about father-son relationships.

Washington DCJCC

Tue., Jan. 6, 7:30 p.m.

Italian

The Butterfly's Dream

(Il sogno della farfalla)

Directed by Marco Bellocchio

(Italy/France/Switzerland, 1994, 112 min.)

Massimo, a young classical actor, will speak only when performing on stage. His family speculates that his motive for this vow of silence in private life must be Massimo's rebellion against his mother, a writer. One day a director spots Massimo in "The Prince of Homburg" and offers him a part, but the only way he can do that is to convince the mother to write a play about Massimo's life.

National Gallery of Art

Sat., Jan. 10, 4:30 p.m.


The Prince of Homburg

(Il principe di Homburg)

Directed by Marco Bellocchio

(Italy, 1997, 85 min.)

In Marco Bellocchio's adaptation of Heinrich von Kleist's 1809 "The Prince of Homburg," a Prussian officer is tricked during the course of a complex dream on the night before a key battle, causing him to misjudge the timing of his attack. Even so, all is not lost.

National Gallery of Art

Sat., Jan. 10, 2:30 p.m.

Portuguese

Housemaids

(Doméstica)

Directed by Gabriel Mascaro

(Brazil, 2013, 76 min.)

Brazil has more domestic workers per capita than any other country. Director Gabriel Mascaro selected seven adolescents from various regions and socioeconomic levels to film their own maid at home for a week (screens with "Santiago").

American University

Sun., Jan. 25, 4:30 p.m.


Iracema

Directed by Jorge Bodanzky and Orlando Senna

(Brazil/W. Germany/France, 1974, 90 min.)

Iracema, a naïve young woman from the Amazon, meets a truck driver and together they take a road trip over the unfinished Trans-Amazon Highway in this landmark of Brazilian cinema.

American University

Fri., Jan. 23, 7 p.m.


Like Water Through Stone

Directed by Marília Rocha

(Brazil, 2009, 85 min.)

In the remote Espinhaço Mountains of Minas Gerais, four young women approach the end of their sheltered and relatively calm adolescence, even as the outside world begins to intrude.

American University

Fri., Jan. 30, 7 p.m.


Santiago

Directed by João Moreira Salles

(Brazil, 2007, 80 min.)

In the early 1990s, João Moreira Salles began filming this portrait of the butler who had served his own family for decades. Salles returned to his project much later (after Santiago's death), resulting in his complex portrayal of a fascinating man (screens with "Housemaids").

American University

Sun., Jan. 25, 4:30 p.m.

Russian

An Unusual Exhibition

(Arachveulebrivi gomopena/ Neobyknovennaya vystavka)

Directed by Eldar Shengelaia

(U.S.S.R., 1968, 96 min.)

Eldar Shengelaia's reflective, provocative tragi-comedy introduces a sculptor who, in order to feed his family, develops a niche specializing in carving monument tombstones bearing the likeness of the departed.

Goethe-Institut

Thu., Jan. 15, 6:30 p.m.

Swedish

Force Majeure aka Tourist

Directed by Ruben Östlund

(Sweden/Denmark/Norway, 2014, 118 min.)

Picture-perfect Swedes Tomas, Ebba and their two kids are enjoying a pleasant family getaway at a French ski resort, until an avalanche strikes. Although everyone walks away unharmed, Tomas's gut reaction to the incident will shake his marriage to its core.

AFI Silver Theatre

Thu., Jan. 15, 7:15 p.m.

   

Events - January 2015

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

EVENT CATEGORIES

Art

Theater

Dance

Festivals

Music

HIGHLIGHTED EVENT

Latvia Marks EU Presidency

To commemorate its rotating presidency of the European Union, Latvia is hosting a series of public events (also see story in this month's issue). The program includes the conference "Toward a Transatlantic Strategy for Europe's East" at the Atlantic Council on Jan. 30; an academic discussion and concert by Peteris Vasks at the George Washington University (Feb. 11) and the Phillips Collection (Feb. 12); a performance by the renowned Latvian National Choir in New York City (April 9 and 11); as well as a contemporary art exhibit in New York through Feb. 28.


ART
 

Through Jan. 1

Celebrating 25 Years on Pennsylvania Avenue

To mark the Canadian Embassy's 25th anniversary, this exhibit of photos, commentary, historical records and objects traces the evolution of Canada's diplomatic presence in D.C., the history of the embassy at 501 Pennsylvania Avenue, and the many ways in which the embassy reflects and continues to shape the friendship between Canada and the United States.

Embassy of Canada


Through Jan. 4

Captain Linnaeus Tripe: Photographer of India and Burma, 1852-1860

In the first major traveling exhibition of photographs by Captain Linnaeus Tripe (1822-1902), some 60 works will include early pictures he took in England as well as the outstanding body of work he produced in India and Burma (now Myanmar) in the 1850s.

National Gallery of Art


Through Jan. 4

En Pie de Foto: Terrorism – A Crime Against Humanity

The Foundation for Victims of Terrorism, in collaboration the Permanent Observer Mission of Spain to the OAS, presents the visual and literally exhibition that denounces terrorism as a mass violation of human rights, while at the same time honoring victims by promoting the global effort toward a more just world of freedom from violence.

Art Museum of the Americas


Through Jan. 4

One Nation With News for All

Ethnic newspapers, radio, television and online publications have helped millions of immigrants to America become part of their new country while preserving their ties to their native lands. This exhibit tells the dramatic story of how immigrants and minorities used the power of the press to fight for their rights and shape the American experience.

Newseum


Through Jan. 4

A Tribute to Anita Reiner

The Phillips Collection hosts a tribute exhibition in memory of Anita Reiner — one of D.C.'s most active art collectors and a longtime friend of the Phillips who passed away Aug. 15, 2013 — with 13 works in a variety of media from Reiner's wide-ranging and highly personal collection of contemporary art.

The Phillips Collection


Through Jan. 9

What We Have Within

Possibilities to externalize and communicate essential aspects of our psyche, beliefs, affiliations or sexual orientations are increasing in modern societies, where freedom of expression is a fundamental right. The artists in this exhibition promote this right, breaking with convention and reinforcing the desire for free and genuine expression.

Art Museum of the Americas


Through Jan. 11

Degas's Little Dancer

"Little Dancer Aged Fourteen" (1878–81), Edgar Degas's groundbreaking statuette of a young ballerina that caused a sensation at the 1881 impressionist exhibition, takes center stage in an exploration of Degas's fascination with ballet and his experimental, modern approach to his work.

National Gallery of Art


Through Jan. 11

Neo-Impressionism and the Dream of Realities: Painting, Poetry, Music

With more than 70 paintings and works on paper, this exhibition demonstrates how the neo-impressionists employed stylization and a deliberate orchestration of color to create landscapes and figures that went far beyond observed nature to accentuate subjectivity and an inner world of experience.

The Phillips Collection


Through Jan. 11

Salvatore Scarpitta: Traveler

A fascinating and singular figure in postwar art, Salvatore Scarpitta (1919-2007) created a powerful body of work that ranges from nonobjective abstraction to radical realism.

Hirshhorn Museum


Jan. 14 to Feb. 13

Martin Karplus: Photographs 1953-2009

Martin Karplus is a chemist, professor emeritus at Harvard University and Nobel laureate who has spent the past 50 years consumed by a passion for documenting humanity in thousands of photographs. Taken in Europe, Asia and the Americas, his photographs capture societies at pivotal moments in their cultural and economic development in rich Kodachrome color.

Embassy of Austria


Through Jan. 19

Magna Carta: Muse and Mentor

"Magna Carta: Muse and Mentor," which features the Lincoln Cathedral Magna Carta, the great charter of rights and liberties, one of only four surviving copies of the original issue in 1215, celebrates the 800th anniversary of Magna Carta, telling the story of the charter's creation in England, reinterpretation through the centuries and emergence as an enduring document of constitutional law in the United States.

Library of Congress

Thomas Jefferson Building


Through Jan. 25

From the Library: The Book Illustrations by Romeyn de Hooghe

Artistically gifted and socially well connected, Romeyn de Hooghe (1645–1708) can help us to unravel the complexities of the late Dutch Golden Age, particularly through his vast and varied oeuvre of book illustrations.

National Gallery of Art


Jan. 26 to May 15

Hands-On Urbanism. The Right to Green

The research-based exhibition is dedicated to the history of the idea of appropriating land in urban space. Since the shockwave of modernization that accompanied industrialization, towns and cities worldwide have had to face some very significant challenges. City-dwellers, who have always found a number of solutions in crisis situations, are involved in bottom-up urban development, as fruit and vegetable gardens led to other forms of collective cohesion, neighborliness and fair distribution.

Embassy of Austria


Through Jan. 31

Contemporary Identities/Invisible Gestures

Showcasing the immense cultural diversity of Iberoamerica through the art of photography, this exhibit features work from artists from 18 different countries of Latin America, Portugal and Spain, centering on the relationship between identity and the self in a digital world.

Mexican Cultural Institute


Through Feb. 1

From Neoclassicism to Futurism: Italian Prints and Drawings, 1800–1925

The visual arts in Italy between the first stirrings of nationalistic sentiment and its corruption into Fascism — the long development of the modern Italian state — remained extraordinarily diverse and vital. The National Gallery of Art has in recent years begun to develop a collection of Italian prints and drawings of this period that is surpassed only by the holdings of Italy's principal museums.

National Gallery of Art


Through Feb. 1

Modern American Prints and Drawings from the Kainen Collection

The final in a series of three exhibitions celebrating the generous bequest of Ruth Cole Kainen, this show explores the first seven decades of 20th-century American art.

National Gallery of Art


Through Feb. 1

Modern and Contemporary Art in the Dominican Republic: Works from the Customs Office Collection

This scenic view and historic sketch of 30 artworks showcases the consistency, quality and diversity of the Collection of the Directorate General of Customs, which stands as one of the more important creative spaces in the region.

Art Museum of the Americas


Through Feb. 6

War from the Victims' Perspective: Photographs by Jean Mohr

In partnership with the Swiss Embassy, Geneva-born photographer Jean Mohr presents images of war, from young refugees to destroyed buildings, to mark the 150th anniversaries of the International Committee of the Red Cross and the 1864 Geneva Convention.

Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars


Through Feb. 16

El Greco in the National Gallery of Art and Washington-Area Collections: A 400th Anniversary Celebration

On the 400th anniversary of El Greco's death, the National Gallery of Art — with one of the largest number of the artist's works in the United States — presents a commemorative exhibition of El Greco's paintings.

National Gallery of Art


Through Feb. 26

Decoding the Renaissance

During the Renaissance, the art and science of cryptography came into its own. The advent of printing, development of diplomacy and creation of postal systems created an obsession with encryption that produced some of the period's most brilliant inventions, most beautiful books and most enduring legacies. This exhibition features the best collection ever assembled of early works on codes and ciphers.

Folger Shakespeare Library


Through March 22

Nasta'liq: The Genius of Persian Calligraphy

More than 20 works ranging in date from 1400 to 1600 form the first exhibition of its kind to focus on nasta‛liq, a calligraphic script that developed in the 14th century in Iran and remains one of the most expressive forms of aesthetic refinement in Persian culture to this day.

Arthur M. Sackler Gallery


Through April 12

Days of Endless Time

This exhibit presents 14 installations that offer prismatic vantage points into the suspension and attenuation of time or that create a sense of timelessness, with themes such as escape, solitude, enchantment and the thrall of nature.

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden


Through April 12

Picturing Mary: Woman, Mother, Idea

For millennia, Mary has been one of the most popular subjects in the history of Western art. This landmark exhibition of more than 60 beautiful depictions of the Virgin Mary explores the concept of womanhood represented by Mary and the power her image has exerted through time.

National Museum of Women in the Arts


Through May 31

Style in Chinese Landscape Painting: The Yuan Legacy

Landscape painting is one of the most outstanding achievements of Chinese culture. Key styles in this genre emerged during the Yuan dynasty (1279–1368) and are still followed today.

Freer Gallery of Art


Through May 31

The Traveler's Eye: Scenes of Asia

Featuring more than 100 works created over the past five centuries, "The Traveler's Eye: Scenes of Asia" provides glimpses of travels across the Asian continent, from pilgrimages and research trips to expeditions for trade and tourism.

Arthur M. Sackler Gallery


Through June 7

Perspectives: Chiharu Shiota

Performance and installation artist Chiharu Shiota, Japan's representative at the 56th Venice Biennale in 2015, will recreate a monumental yet intimate work in the Sackler pavilion that amasses personal memories through an accumulation of nearly 400 individual shoes, each with a note from the donor describing lost individuals and past moments.

Arthur M. Sackler Gallery


Through June 7

Unearthing Arabia: The Archaeological Adventures of Wendell Phillips

Wendell Phillips, a young paleontologist and geologist, headed one of the largest archaeological expeditions to remote South Arabia (present-day Yemen) from 1949 to 1951. Through a selection of unearthed objects as well as film and photography shot by the expedition team, the exhibition highlights Phillips's key finds, recreates his adventures (and misadventures), and conveys the thrill of discovery on this important great archaeological frontier.

Arthur M. Sackler Gallery


Through June 14

Zen, Tea, and Chinese Art in Medieval Japan

Zen Buddhism, tea and ink painting — well-known expressions of Japanese culture — have their roots in Chinese arts and ideas brought to medieval Japan from the late 12th to the 16th century. Chinese and Japanese paintings, lacquer ware and ceramics illuminate this remarkable period of cultural contact and synthesis.

Freer Gallery of Art


Through Sept. 13

Chief S.O. Alonge: Photographer to the Royal Court of Benin, Nigeria

This retrospective showcases the work of noted Nigerian photographer Chief S.O. Alonge, the first indigenous photographer of the Royal Court of Benin, in conjunction with royal arts from the Benin kingdom. The collection of historic photographs was captured on Kodak glass-plate negatives and documents more than 50 years of the ritual, pageantry and regalia of the obas (kings), their wives and retainers.

National Museum of African Art

 

DANCE

Jan. 27 to Feb. 1

Mariinsky Ballet

Russia's Mariinsky Ballet brings a program featuring Hodson's "Le sacre du printemps" inspired by Nijinsky, Fokine's "Le Spectre de la Rose" and "The Swan," as well as Petipa's Paquita "Grand Pas."

Kennedy Center Opera House

FESTIVALS

Sat., Jan. 24, 10 a.m.

Hylton in the Highlands Festival

Spend the day celebrating the rich culture and history of Scotland with performances, exhibits and interactive experiences for all ages. From fiddles and dancing to bagpipes, tea and whisky tastings, there's something for everyone at the Hylton in the Highlands Festival.

George Mason University Hylton Performing Arts Center

MUSIC

Thu., Jan. 8, 8 p.m.

Dobet Gnahoré

Discover delicate ballads and sensuous African grooves from Dobet Gnahoré, a Grammy-winning vocalist born in Côte d'Ivoire who sings in seven languages and has been praised as one of contemporary African music's most charismatic talents. Tickets are $25 to $30.

The Barns at Wolf Trap


Mon., Jan. 19, 7:30 p.m.

Ramsch & Rosen

Amongst old paintings, manuscripts, and between the lines, Julia Lacherstorfer and Simon Zöchbauer rummage for old tunes. A layer of dust carefully wiped away, what they discover usually turns out to be a treasure chest of music that bridges past and present. Tickets are free but registration can be made at acfdc.org.

Embassy of Austria


Fri., Jan. 23, 8 p.m.

Budapest Festival Orchestra

In the pantheon of great international orchestras, the Budapest Festival Orchestra (founded in 1983 by Iván Fischer and Zoltán Kocsis) is a relatively young one. Yet the rich musical tradition of Eastern Europe is evident in every note played by the BFO, which has established itself as one of the world's leading ensembles. Please call for ticket information.

Music Center at Strathmore


Thu., Jan. 29, 7:30 p.m.

Vadim Neselovskyi, Jazz Piano

Ukrainian-born pianist Vadim Neselovskyi was classically trained at conservatories in his native Odessa and in Germany; honed his jazz chops on German jazz stages and at Berklee College of Music; and undertook his apprenticeship around the world as a member of master vibraphonist Gary Burton's Next Generation Quintet. Please call for ticket information.

Music Center at Strathmore


Jan. 29 to 31

National Symphony Orchestra: Fantasy & Fate: Tchaikovsky Masterworks

Praised for her "balanced lyricism and fire" (New York Times), Arabella Steinbacher plays Tchaikovsky's "Violin Concerto" on a program that also includes the Russian master's "Symphony No. 4" and tone poem "Fate." Tickets are $10 to $85.

Kennedy Center Concert Hall


Fri., Jan. 30, 8 p.m.

Ladysmith Black Mambazo

Since their groundbreaking 1986 performances on Paul Simon's "Graceland" album, each year has brought new fame for this vibrant ensemble, whose 2014 album "Live: Singing for Peace Around the World won a Grammy Award" — the group's fourth. Please call for ticket information.

Music Center at Strathmore


Sat., Jan. 31, 8 p.m.

State Symphony Orchestra of México

This esteemed State Symphony Orchestra of México, which has interpreted the classics with great reverence for over 40 years, pays tribute to its Spanish roots with an exquisite performance featuring the works of Enrique Granados, Isaac Albéniz, Manuel de Falla and other great Spanish composers. Tickets are $30 to $50.

George Mason University Center for the Arts

THEATER

Through Jan. 1

A Christmas Carol

Acclaimed Washington stage actor Edward Gero returns for the sixth year to play Ebenezer Scrooge in the production the Washington Post hailed as "musically high-spirited" and "infectiously jolly." Tickets are $22 to $95.

Ford's Theatre


Through Jan. 4

Famous Puppet Death Scenes

Canada's Old Trout Puppet Workshop's "Famous Puppet Death Scenes" is a darkly comedic alternative to more typical seasonal theater fare, featuring a collection of 22 grisly snippets from puppet dramas including "The Ballad of Edward Grue" by Samuel Groanswallow and "The Feverish Heart" by Nordo Frot. Tickets start at $35.

Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company


Through Jan. 4

Fiddler on the Roof

Celebrate the 50th anniversary of an American musical classic with this new, in-the-round production of the joyful tale of family, community and life's unexpected miracles. Tickets are $50 to $99.

Arena Stage


Through Jan. 4

Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Democrat

Tim Rice and Andrew Lloyd Webber's musical about the trials and triumphs of Israel's favorite son features Broadway stars and "American Idol" sensations, husband-and-wife duo Diana DeGarmo and Ace Young. Tickets are $25 to $155.

Kennedy Center Opera House


Jan. 6 to 11

The Illusionists

The world's best-selling magic show comes direct from Broadway. This mind-blowing spectacular showcases the talents of seven incredible Illusionists with thrilling and sophisticated magic of unprecedented proportions. Tickets are $39 to $125.

Kennedy Center Opera House


Jan. 7 to Feb. 22

Choir Boy

For 50 years, the elite boarding school Charles R. Drew Prep has stood by its traditions and prepared young black men to lead. But times and finances have changed, and the pressure on Drew's legendary gospel choir is high. So when an ambitious and talented student is told to ignore a gay slur to take his place as the choir's leader, he has to decide who he is and what he's willing to fight for. Tickets are $44 to $88.

Studio Theatre


Through Jan. 11

Beauty and the Beast

In this gothic romance based on the original French tale, a young girl befriends the terrifying beast that holds her captive. This darkly fantastical production illuminates the Beauty's own secrets and her Beast's true nature, bringing wonder, magic and seduction to a classic story. Tickets start at $35.

Synetic Theater


Through Jan. 11

The Tempest

Trickery and magic, romance and revenge set the stage for one of Shakespeare's late masterpieces, in which sprites, goddesses and fools hold court. Please call for ticket prices.

The Shakespeare Theatre


Jan. 16 to Feb. 12

Gigi

Starring Vanessa Hudgens, Eric Schaeffer directs a world premiere production of Lerner and Loewe's musical comedy, where true love between a free-spirited young woman and a wealthy young playboy must overcome the conventions of turn-of-the-century Paris. Tickets are $45 to $145.

Kennedy Center Eisenhower Theater


Jan. 16 to Feb. 22

Baskerville: A Sherlock Holmes Mystery

Five actors deftly portray more than 40 characters in this fast-paced, comedic retelling of Sherlock Holmes's most notorious case, "The Hound of the Baskervilles," by the award-winning mastermind of mayhem, Ken Ludwig. Tickets are $45 to $90.

Arena Stage


Through Jan. 25

Diner

Christmas, Baltimore, 1959: A circle of childhood friends reunites for the upcoming wedding of one of them. From the comfort of their all-night diner, the men, now in their early-twenties, confront the realities of adulthood: marriage, careers, money and the ever-mysterious opposite sex. Please call for ticket prices.

Signature Theatre

   

Real Estate Classifieds - January 2015

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

diplomat.re.classifieds1.jan15

diplomat.re.classifieds2.jan15

   

Classifieds - January 2015

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

diplomat.classifieds1.jan15

diplomat.classifieds2.jan15

   

Follow The Diplomat: icon-facebook icon-twitter icon-linkedin icon-rss instagram