March 2015

diplomat.cover.turkey.digital.march15

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Cover Story

Turkey Confronts Threats
Close to Home, Critics Abroad

a5.turkey.camp.homeWith chaos on its borders, unrest at home and growing criticism from abroad, Turkey's envoy in Washington has been besieged by problems from all sides. Read More 

People of World Influence

IRI President Advocates Painstaking
Groundwork of Democracy Promotion

a1.powi.green.homeMark Green wants to make the International Republican Institute more "aggressive" in promoting democracy, but he also has to deal with an impatient Congress back home and critics abroad who say Washington's democracy-engineering programs are simply regime-change schemes. Read More


Israel's Ambassadors

Two Israeli Ambassadors Embark
On Very Different Political Paths

a2.israel.sign.homeAs one former Israeli ambassador runs for political office back home, another is making waves in Washington for his unorthodox diplomatic style. Read More


The Oil Ride

Falling Oil Prices Are Boon to Some,
Bane to World's Petroleum Exporters

a3.oil.kazakhstan.homeThe plunge in oil prices has been a boon for some countries, a calamity for others — and an unpredictable roller-coaster ride for everyone. Read More


Unwelcome Refugees

Syria's Refugees Find
Many Doors Closed

a4.syria.refugees.family.homeSyria's civil war has sparked one of the worst migration crises in recent memory, but millions of refugees are discovering that certain doors are more open than others. Read More


Still Pivoting

Despite Bumps, Obama Steers
Course for Asia-Pacific Pivot

a6.asia.pivot.flags.homePressing global crises from Syria to Ukraine seem to have conspired to relegate Asia to the sidelines, but President Obama insists that his pivot is still very much on course. Read More


Digital Diplomacy Forum

New Book on Digital Diplomacy
Offers Cautionary Tech Tales

a7.andrea.digital.group.homeAndreas Sandre of the Italian Embassy has written a new book to help foreign policy practitioners navigate the perils of digital diplomacy. Read More

Treating the Treatment

Chemotherapy: When the Cure
Seems Worse than the Disease

a8.medical.chemotherapy.molecule.homeBecause the side effects of chemotherapy are so debilitating, there's a whole field of cancer research devoted just to developing treatments for the treatments. Read More

   

IRI President Advocates Painstaking Groundwork of Democracy Promotion

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

By Michael Coleman

Read more: IRI President Advocates Painstaking Groundwork of Democracy Promotion
   

Two Israeli Ambassadors Embark On Very Different Political Paths

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

By Larry Luxner

Read more: Two Israeli Ambassadors Embark On Very Different Political Paths
   

Falling Oil Prices Are Boon to Some, Bane to World’s Petroleum Exporters

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

By Larry Luxner

Read more: Falling Oil Prices Are Boon to Some, Bane to World’s Petroleum Exporters
   

Syria’s Refugees Find Many Doors Closed

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

By Martin Austermuhle

Read more: Syria’s Refugees Find Many Doors Closed
   

Turkey Confronts Threats Close to Home, Critics Abroad

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

By Larry Luxner

Read more: Turkey Confronts Threats Close to Home, Critics Abroad
   

Despite Bumps, Obama Steers Course for Asia-Pacific Pivot

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

By Larry Luxner

Read more: Despite Bumps, Obama Steers Course for Asia-Pacific Pivot
   

New Book on Digital Diplomacy Offers Cautionary Tech Tales

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

By Molly McCluskey

Read more: New Book on Digital Diplomacy Offers Cautionary Tech Tales
   

Chemotherapy: When the Cure Seems Worse than the Disease

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

By Gina Shaw

Read more: Chemotherapy: When the Cure Seems Worse than the Disease
   

Eco-Friendly Finnish Embassy Goes Green — and Platinum

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

By Molly McCluskey

Read more: Eco-Friendly Finnish Embassy Goes Green — and Platinum
   

Kennedy Center Spotlights Spanish- and Portuguese-Speaking Worlds

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

By Molly McCluskey

Read more: Kennedy Center Spotlights Spanish- and Portuguese-Speaking Worlds
   

Athlete-MBA Wife and Latvian Ambassador Run Toward Same Goal

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

By Gail Scott

Read more: Athlete-MBA Wife and Latvian Ambassador Run Toward Same Goal
   

In ‘Cherokee,’ Escape from Suburbia Leads to Existentialist Trek

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

By Michael Coleman

Read more: In ‘Cherokee,’ Escape from Suburbia Leads to Existentialist Trek
   

Spanish Craftsmen, Designers Team Up to Bounce Back

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

By Sarah Alaoui

Read more: Spanish Craftsmen, Designers Team Up to Bounce Back
   

‘Mary Stuart’ Is Volatile Mix of Political Intrigue and Personal Torment

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

By Lisa Troshinsky

Read more: ‘Mary Stuart’ Is Volatile Mix of Political Intrigue and Personal Torment
   

Summer House Santa Monica Brings West Coast Warmth to D.C.

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

By Rachel G. Hunt

Read more: Summer House Santa Monica Brings West Coast Warmth to D.C.
   

Coming-of-Age Troubles of ‘Girlhood’ Are Current Yet Universal

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

By Ky N. Nguyen

Read more: Coming-of-Age Troubles of ‘Girlhood’ Are Current Yet Universal
   

Climate Change is Focus of 23rd Environmental Film Festival

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

By Ky N. Nguyen

Read more: Climate Change is Focus of 23rd Environmental Film Festival
   

Films - March 2015

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

By Cari

Languages

Amharic

Flemish

Gujarati

Swahali


Azerbaijani

French

Hebrew

 


English

Gallegan

Japanese

 

Finnish

Georgian

Russian

 

Amharic

 Beti and Amare

Directed by Andy Siege

(Ethiopia/Germany/Canada, 2014, 94 min.)

In 1936 Ethiopia, Beti, a young woman, has escaped Mussolini's invading troops and found refuge in the peaceful south of Ethiopia with her uncle. But as the Italians march ever closer, Beti has to battle hunger, thirst and the unwelcome sexual advances of the local militia.

AFI Silver Theatre

Sat., March 14, 9:15 p.m.,

Mon., March 16, 9:20 p.m.

 

Triangle – Going to America

Directed by Theodros Teshome

(Ethiopia, 2014, 90 min.)

Kaleab and Jemal, like many of their fellow countrymen, are willing to risk everything in hopes of finding a better life in America. On the arduous journey, they meet the beautiful Winta, a fellow migrant from neighboring Eritrea. Kaleab and Winta fall in love and endure tragedy as they make their way from East Africa through Libya, Italy, Mexico and finally to America (opening night of the New African Film Festival).

AFI Silver Theatre

Thu., March 12, 7:15 p.m.,

Sat., March 14, 6:30 p.m.

 

Azerbaijani

 Ashik Kerib

Directed by Sergei Paradjanov

(U.S.S.R., 1988, 78 min.)

When Ashik Kerib, a poor singer and saz (Turkish guitar) player, is denied the hand of the woman he loves, he sets out on a 10-year journey (screens with "The Legend of Suram Fortress").

Freer Gallery of Art

Sun., March 15, 3:45 p.m.

 

English

B'ella

Directed by Tawonga Taddja Nkhonjera

(Malawi, 2014, 111 min.)

In the small Malawi village that 17-year-old B'ella calls home, AIDS is an ever-present danger. She goes to school and struggles with teenage life and all its problems: stormy relationships with friends, jealousy and the yearning for love and intimacy.

AFI Silver Theatre

Sun., March 15, 2:30 p.m.,

Tue., March 17, 5:15 p.m.

 

Black November

Directed by Jeta Amata

(Nigeria/U.S., 2015, 96 min.)

A volatile, oil-rich Nigerian community wages war against their corrupt government and a multi-national oil corporation to protect their land from being destroyed by excessive drilling and spills.

AFI Silver Theatre

Fri., March 13, 9:30 p.m.,

Tue., March 17, 9:45 p.m.

 

Bye Bye Car

Directed by Martijn Kieft

(Netherlands, 2014, 50 min.)

Investigating the first spectacular signs of the future of mobility, director Martijn Kieft speaks with a variety of users, experts, business representatives and engineers to find out what they think the future of transportation has in store for us (Environmental Film Festival).

Royal Netherlands Embassy

Wed., March 18, 6 p.m.

 

Charlie's Country

Directed by Rolf de Heer

(Australia, 2014, 108 min.)

Living in a remote Aboriginal community in northern Australia, Charlie is a warrior lost between two cultures and ways of life. Modern society offers survival but the government's stranglehold restricts all his power and independence (Environmental Film Festival).

Embassy of Australia

Tue., March 17, 6:45 p.m.

 

A Dangerous Game

Directed by Anthony Baxter

(U.K., 2014, 98 min.)

Our ability to protect what's left of our vanishing and fragile world is threatened when rapacious developers build golf courses on fragile and historically significant lands, often in cahoots with local officials (Environmental Film Festival).

Landmark's E Street Cinema

Wed., March 18, 7 p.m.

 

E-Waste Tragedy

Directed by Cosima Dannoritzer

(Spain, 2014, 86 min.)

Every year millions of tons of discarded electronic waste — computers, television sets, mobile phones, household appliances _ are shipped illegally to India, China or Africa (Environmental Film Festival).

Goethe-Institut

Wed., March 25, 6:30 p.m.

 

Four Corners

Directed by Ian Gabriel

(South Africa, 2013, 114 min.)

Thirteen-year-old chess prodigy Ricardo, fatherless and raised by his grandmother, finds himself at a crossroads, lured in equal measure by the thrill of the chessboard and the seductive prestige of joining a powerful street gang (English and Afrikaans).

AFI Silver Theatre

Fri., March 13, 7 p.m.,

Thu., March 19, 9:05 p.m.

 

An Honest Liar

Directed by Tyler Measom and Justin Weinstein

(U.S./Spain/Italy/Canada, 2014, 92 min.)

A story of cons and deceptions enacted for both good and evil, "An Honest Liar" follows the life of James "The Amazing" Randi, a world-renowned magician, escape artist and master skeptic who has entertained and educated the world for over 50 years.

Landmark's E Street Cinema

Opens Fri., March 20

 

Journey to the Safest Place on Earth

Directed by Edgar Hagen

(Switzerland, 2013, 100 min.)

Lethal, highly radioactive nuclear waste from decades of nuclear power use will remain toxic for centuries. Locating a final repository for the most dangerous waste man has ever produced is one of the great challenges facing the world today (Environmental Film Festival).

Embassy of Switzerland

Thu., March 19, 6 p.m.

 

Just Eat It: A Food Waste Story

Directed by Grant Baldwin and Jen Rustemeyer

(Canada, 2014, 75 min.)

Nearly 50 percent of food, worth billions of dollars, is discarded in North America each year. The film explores our nation's systemic and ruinous obsession with expiration dates and perfect produce, ultimately revealing the devastating consequences of our habits across the globe (Environmental Film Festival).

Embassy of France

Wed., March 25, 7 p.m.

 

Kumiko, the Treasure Hunter

Directed by David Zellner and Nathan Zellner

(U.S., 2015, 105 min.)

A Japanese woman discovers a VHS copy of "Fargo" and, believing it to be a treasure map of a hidden stash of money, escapes her life in Tokyo for the frozen tundra of North Dakota in search of fortune (English and Japanese).

Landmark's E Street Cinema

Opens Fri., March 27

 

Lago Enriquillo ... A Prelude to Climate Change

Directed by Fernando Báez

(Dominican Republic, 2014, 73 min.)

Flora, fauna and legends are overshadowed by the effects of climate change in the largest lake in the Antilles (Environmental Film Festival).

GALA Hispanic Theatre

Wed., March 20, 8 p.m.

 

Love Hunter

Directed by Branislav Bala and Nemanja Bala

(U.S., 2014, 86 min.)

Manhattan cab driver, who is an idolized rock 'n' roll icon and political activist back home in Serbia, spends nights behind the wheel to finance his faltering dream of achieving musical stardom.

West End Cinema

Thu., March 5, 7:30 p.m.

 

Marmato

Directed by Mark Grieco

(Colombia, 2014, 87 min.)

The small Colombian mining town of Marmato sits on $20 billion dollars in gold and the new global gold rush miners have taken notice (English and Spanish; Environmental Film Festival).

National Museum of Natural History

Sat., March 28, 12 p.m.

 

Merchants of Doubt

Directed by Robert Kenner

(U.S., 2014, 96 min.)

This documentary lifts the curtain on a secretive group of highly charismatic, silver-tongued pundits-for-hire who present themselves in the media as scientific authorities, yet have the contrary aim of spreading maximum confusion about well-studied public threats ranging from toxic chemicals to pharmaceuticals to climate change.

Landmark's E Street Cinema

Opens Fri., March 13

 

Monsoon

Directed by Sturla Gunnarsson

(Canada/France, 2014, 106 min.)

The annual rains that descend upon India alternately result in disastrous and beneficial impacts on Indian society, economy, agriculture and individual lives (Environmental Film Festival).

National Museum of Natural History

Fri., March 27, 7:15 p.m.

 

Population Boom

Directed by Werner Boote

(Austria, 2013, 87 min.)

The world's current total of 7 billion residents might double in 61 years. The production of food and consumer goods would have to increase considerably to satisfy the new demand, and the amount of refuse and pollution would grow as well (English and German; Environmental Film Festival).

Embassy of Austria

Wed., March 25, 7:30 p.m.

 

Queen and Country

Directed by John Boorman

(U.K./France/Romania, 2015, 115 min.)

A decade after a young Bill Rohan rejoiced in the destruction of his school by an errant Luftwaffe bomb, he begins basic training in the early 1950s, during the Korean War. He is joined by a trouble-making army mate, but they never get near Korea, instead engaging in a constant battle of wits.

Landmark's E Street Cinema

Opens Fri., March 13

 

Riverblue

Directed by David McIlvride

(Canada, 2015, 83 min.)

Through harsh chemical manufacturing processes and the irresponsible disposal of toxic chemical waste, blue jean manufacturing has destroyed rivers and distressed the lives of people who count on these waterways for their survival (Environmental Film Festival).

National Museum of Women in the Arts

Sun., March 22, 3 p.m.

 

Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel

Directed by John Madden

(U.S./U.K., 2015, 122 min.)

The gang of British retirees reunites as hotel owner Sonny pursues his expansionist dreams in India, making more claims on his time than he has available while romance blooms for his tenants.

Angelika Mosaic

Opens Fri., March 6

 

See No Evil

Directed by Jos de Putter

(Netherlands, 2014, 70 min.)

Three retired apes: a film star, a scientist and a cripple look back at their lives and the intriguing relationship between humans and apes in this poetic, painful documentary (Environmental Film Festival).

Embassy of France

Tue., March 24, 7 p.m.

 

Thule Tuvalu

Directed by Matthias von Gunten

(Switzerland, 2013, 98 min.)

With Thule's glacial ice melting at record levels and Tuvalu's landmass sinking below the rising sea, the inhabitants must respond to climate change or perish (Environmental Film Festival).

Embassy of France

Mon., March 23, 7 p.m.

 

Veve

Directed by Simon Mukali

(Kenya/Germany, 2014, 95 min.)

This film follows the lives of multiple characters trying to find themselves in a world of political intrigue, revenge, love and longing for success — set against the backdrop of the thriving yet unregulated veve business (veve, or chat, is a mildly narcotic East African crop).

AFI Silver Theatre

Sun., March 15, 9 p.m.,

Thu., March 19, 7:10 p.m.

 

What We Do in the Shadows

Directed by Jemaine Clement and Taika Waititi

(New Zealand, 2014, 96 min.)

In this hilarious comedy, an endearingly unhip quartet of flatmates — and vampires — squabble over household chores, struggle to keep up with the latest trends, antagonize the local werewolves and deal with the rigors of living on a very, very strict diet.

Landmark's E Street Cinema

 

Where the Road Runs Out

Directed by Rudolf Buitendach

(Equatorial Guinea/South Africa/Netherlands, 2014, 91 min.)

From an illustrious scientific career in the lecture halls of Europe, professor George Mensa finds himself back in Africa when a friend unexpectedly passes away. Inheriting a field station in the mosquito-infested jungle, George soon learns that challenges come in all sizes — especially when a local orphan boy shows up at his doorstep.

AFI Silver Theatre

Sun., March 15, 4:45 p.m.,

Wed., March 18, 8:30 p.m.

 

Finnish

My Stuff

(Tavarataivas)

Directed by Petri Luukkainen

(Finland, 2013, 80 min.)

Petri is in the middle of an existential crisis when he decides to start an experiment on himself: He puts all his belongings in a storage container and for one year, allows himself to retrieve only one item per day (Environmental Film Festival).

Embassy of Finland

Wed., March 18, 6:30 p.m.

 

Flemish

The New Wilderness

Directed by Mark Verkerk and Ruben Smit

(Netherlands, 2013, 94 min.)

In one of the most densely populated and manipulated countries of Europe lies the Oostvaardersplassen, a unique experiment in letting nature run wild. This documentary charts the cycle of life through the course of four seasons in this thriving, verdant wetland (Flemish and Dutch; Environmental Film Festival).

AFI Silver Theatre

Sat., March 28, 3:10 p.m.

 

French

The Fox and the Child

(Le renard et l'enfant)

Directed by Luc Jacquet

(France, 2007, 92 min.)

A 10-year-old girl sees a fox up close on the way to school. He sits as she watches. Over the summer, while following the fox, the girl lives through many adventures and learns to appreciate the beauty of the natural world (Environmental Film Festival).

West End Cinema

Sun., March 22, 12 p.m.

 

Goodbye to Language 3D

(Adieu au langage)

Directed by Jean-Luc Godard

(Switzerland/France, 2014, 70 min.)

Jean-Luc Godard's sensorially immersive experience employs verbal and visual poetry via 3D technology to mind-expanding effect, as a married woman and a single man meet. They love, they argue, fists fly, a dog strays between town and country, the seasons pass and then a second film begins — the same as the first, and yet not.

Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinema

Opens Fri., March 20

 

Left Foot, Right Foot

Directed by Germinal Roaux

(Switzerland/France, 2013, 105 min.)

Marie, 19, is attracted to easy money and, without realizing it, becomes involved in prostitution. She doesn't tell her friend Vincent, a nonchalant 21-year-old skater who owes everyone money and just can't seem to grow up — both of them caught up in a society where money, appearance and perpetual self-delusion are everything.

West End Cinema

Tue., March 10, 7 p.m.

 

March of the Penguins

Directed by Luc Jacquet

(France/U.S., 2005, 80 min.)

Emperor penguins overcome formidable obstacles to return to their breeding grounds for mating season in this Oscar-winning film by Luc Jacquet (French and English; Environmental Film Festival).

Avalon Theatre

Sat., March 21, 10:30 a.m.

 

National Diploma

Directed by Dieudo Hamadi

(Congo/France, 2014, 92 min.)

Filmmaker Dieudo Hamadi follows a group of young Congolese high school students struggling to graduate and pass their exam in this captivating documentary (French and Lingala).

AFI Silver Theatre

Sat., March 14, 12:45 p.m.,

Wed., March 18, 5:15 p.m.

 

Run

Directed by Philippe Lacôte

(Côte d'Ivoire/France, 2014, 102 min.)

In his ambitious narrative feature debut, director Philippe Lacôte balances fantasy with vérité to illuminate the frayed world of a fatherless young man growing up in the Ivory Coast.

AFI Silver Theatre

Sat., March 14, 2:45 p.m.,

Mon., March 16, 7:15 p.m.

 

Soleils

Directed by Dani Kouyaté

(Burkina Faso/France, 2014, 96 min.)

Part road trip through time, part heroine's journey through memory, this film is a beautifully rendered meditation on the wisdom of Africa, as a young woman is initiated into the roots and legacy of her heritage.

AFI Silver Theatre

Sun., March 15, 6:45 p.m.,

Mon., March 16, 5:15 p.m.

 

Timbuktu

Directed by Abderrahmane Sissako

(France/Mauritania, 2014, 97 min.)

Mauritania's first-ever official entry for Best Foreign Language Film Academy Award consideration looks at the brief occupation of Timbuktu by militant religious fundamentalists. Not far from Timbuktu, Kidane lives peacefully in the dunes with his family, but their destiny changes when Kidane accidentally kills the fisherman who slaughtered his beloved cow and he has to face the new laws of the foreign occupants (French, Arabic, Bambara, English and Songhay).

Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinema

 

Gallegan

Costa da Morte

Directed by Lois Patiño

(Spain, 2015, 81 min.)

In this stunningly photographed documentary, craftsmen wage an intimate battle while fishermen and loggers dig into the mystery of the landscape interwoven with the region's history and legends (Environmental Film Festival).

AFI Silver Theatre

Mon., March 23, 7:10 p.m.

 

Georgia

Blind Dates

Directed by Levan Koguashvili

(Georgia, 2013, 95 min.)

A shining example of contemporary Georgian cinema, this romantic tragicomedy tells the story of forty-something Sandro, who lives with his parents and has no luck finding love while his best friend meets and dates various women.

Freer Gallery of Art

Fri., March 20, 7 p.m.

 

The Legend of Suram Fortress

Directed by Sergei Paradjanov and Dodo Abashidze

(U.S.S.R., 1985, 82 min.)

Based on a Caucasus Mountains legend that tells of the Georgian people's efforts to construct a fortress against invaders, a fortune-teller recalls a prophecy that a handsome young man must be walled inside alive their fortress in order for the building to stand. The son of her own lover is the sacrificial lamb (screens with "Ashik Kerib").

Freer Gallery of Art

Sun., March 15, 2 p.m.

 

The Way Home

Directed by Aleksandr Rekhviashvili

(U.S.S.R., 1981, 83 min.)

The way home for director Aleksandr Rekhviashvili is not charted in the conventional sense. It takes the viewer along some peculiar roads: Georgian history and legend, politics and social stratification, religion and ethics, wrapped in an allusive, stylized allegory from beginning to end.

Freer Gallery of Art

Fri., March 13, 7 p.m.

 

The Wishing Tree

Directed by Tengiz Abuladze

(U.S.S.R., 1977, 107 min.)

Folklore and legend shape this pastoral film set in a picturesque, pre-Revolution Georgia. Spanning four seasons in the lives of an assortment of village characters, more than twenty moral tales are folded into the narrative, centering on a beautiful young woman forced to marry a man she does not love.

Embassy of France

Tue., March 31, 7 p.m.


Gujarati

My Name Is Salt

Directed by Farida Pacha

(Switzerland, 2013, 92 min.)

For eight months of the year in India's saline desert, Chhanabhai and his family live here without water, electricity or provisions, tirelessly working the salt fields. After months of rhythmic labor, they must harvest the salt before heavy monsoon rains wash their industry away (Environmental Film Festival).

AFI Silver Theatre

Sat., March 28, 5:15 p.m.

 

Hebrew

Gett: The Trial of Viviane Amsalem

Directed by Ronit Elkabetz and Shlomi Elkabetz

(Israel/Germany/France, 2014, 115 min.)

An Israeli woman seeking to finalize a divorce (gett) from her estranged husband finds herself effectively put on trial by her country's religious marriage laws, in this powerhouse courtroom drama (Hebrew, French and Arabic).

Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinema

 

Japanese

Appleseed: Alpha

Directed by Shinji Aramaki

(Japan, 2013, 93 min.)

In this prequel to the "Appleseed" anime films, female soldier Deunan and her hulking cyborg partner Briareos roam a World War III-ravaged New York in search of the legendary city of Olympus, mankind's last hope (screens with "Harlock: Space Pirate").

Freer Gallery of Art

Sat., March 28, 3 p.m.

 

Grave of the Fireflies

(Hotaru no haka)

Directed by Isao Takahata

(Japan, 1988, 89 min.)

With their mother killed and father missing during World War II, two siblings fight for survival in an abandoned shelter and find respite and entertainment from fireflies lighting the sky overhead in this animated film (Environmental Film Festival).

AFI Silver Theatre

Sat., March 21, 7 p.m.

 

Harlock: Space Pirate

Directed by Shinji Aramaki

(Japan, 2013, 115 min.)

This 3D sci-fi adventure with eye-popping CGI effects tells the story of a mysterious loner who battles the malevolent Gaia Coalition, which is bent on ruling the universe (screens with "Appleseed: Alpha").

Freer Gallery of Art

Sat., March 28, 11 a.m.

 

Pom Poko

Directed by Isao Takahata

(Japan, 1994, 119 min.)

A community of magical, shape-shifting raccoon dogs desperately struggles to prevent their forest home from being destroyed by urban development (Environmental Film Festival).

AFI Silver Theatre

Sun., March 22, 1 p.m.

 

Sunshine Ahead

Directed by Toshio Lee

(Japan, 2010, 120 min.)

Kenji quits his job to grow and transplant coral in his hometown of Okinawa, attempting to revive the reefs, protect this resource for his children and change people's view of the ocean (Environmental Film Festival).

Japan Information and Culture Center

Fri., March 27, 6:30 p.m.

 

Russian

Tangerines

Directed by Zaza Urushadze

(Georgia, 2013, 83 min.)

An elderly civilian finds himself caring for two wounded soldiers on opposite sides of battle in this Oscar-nominated antiwar parable, set during the notorious 1992 Georgian-Abkhazian conflict (Russian and Estonian).

Freer Gallery of Art

Sun., March 22, 2 p.m.

 

Swahili

White Shadow

Directed by Noaz Deshe

(Tanzania/Germany/Italy, 2013, 117 min.)

Alias, a young albino boy on the run after witnessing his father's murder, is sent to find refuge in the city, far from the witch doctors who offer thousands of dollars for albino body parts (Swahili and English).

AFI Silver Theatre

Tue., March 17, 7:25 p.m.,

Thu., March 19, 5:15 p.m.

   

Events - March 2015

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

EVENT CATEGORIES

Art

Theater

Dance

Discussions

Music

ART 

Through March 1

Trees are Poems

Four renowned Finnish photo artists, Kristoffer Albrecht, Taneli Eskola, Pentti Sammallahti and Ritva Kovalainen, present their perspectives on trees, key elements in landscape art. The exhibition is not actually a cross section of trees as a motif in art, but the photo artists have approached the theme by the stories and mood behind them. Trees can be seen not only as an element of the landscape but also as a symbol of life and human existence. Exhibit is open on Saturdays and Sundays.

Embassy of Finland

 

March 5 to May 1

gute aussichten: new german photography 2014/2015

In its eleventh year, the eight "gute aussichten 2014/2015" award winners are hot on life's heels. This young generation of photographers is after the most basic and existential questions of life: the banality of death and what remains — or follows the deceased and vanishes without a trace — migration, discrimination, loneliness, isolation and desperation, all of which are put face to face with happiness, cognizance, diversity and creative energy.

Goethe-Institut

 

Through March 6

Primal Connections: Paintings by Deanna Schwartzberg

Deanna Schwartzberg's passionate concern for the environment and keen awareness of the destructive forces that threaten our ability to live in harmony with nature has been the impetus of her work for many years. In her paintings, we enter a world of color and light that inspires us to contemplate the shared presence of humanity and the natural world.

Art Museum of the Americas

 

March 11 to May 1

Fordlandia: The Lost City of Henry Ford

This series of photographs, completed in 2012, reveals what has become of Fordlandia, the American town built in the Brazilian rainforest by tycoon Henry Ford. Today, the town is a post-industrial wasteland, complete with prefabricated industrial sheds from Michigan and American clapperboard houses. More curious still is that, in spite of no new economy or employer in the area, Fordlandia is coming back to life.

Art Museum of the Americas

 

Through March 15

Identidad

"Identidad" showcases the work of Argentinean glassmaker Silvia Levenson, featuring 116 intricate pieces of cast glass baby clothing, an homage to the social movement of the Grandmothers of the Plaza de Mayo. The grandmothers led a campaign to reunite missing grandchildren with their families following the Dirty War, a dark chapter in the country's history.

American University Museum

Katzen Arts Center

 

March 19 to Aug. 23

Ships, Clocks & Stars: The Quest for Longitude

To mark the 300th anniversary of the passing of the Longitude Act in 1714, this landmark exhibition tells the extraordinary story of the race to determine longitude (east-west position) at sea, helping to solve the problem of navigation and saving seafarers from terrible fates including shipwreck and starvation.

Folger Shakespeare Library

 

Through March 22

Nasta'liq: The Genius of Persian Calligraphy

More than 20 works ranging in date from 1400 to 1600 form the first exhibition of its kind to focus on nasta‛liq, a calligraphic script that developed in the 14th century in Iran and remains one of the most expressive forms of aesthetic refinement in Persian culture to this day.

Arthur M. Sackler Gallery

 

Through March 29

Cutting-Edge Spanish Crafts

Curated by Tachy Mora, and based in her book "Cutting-Edge Spanish Crafts," this exhibition invites you to discover the contemporary crafts from Spain through a selection of objects by individual crafters and designers, industrial innovators and large firms, including Loewe, Lladró, Cerabella, Apparatu and Peseta.

Spanish Cultural Center

 

Through April 12

Days of Endless Time

This exhibit presents 14 installations that offer prismatic vantage points into the suspension and attenuation of time or that create a sense of timelessness, with themes such as escape, solitude, enchantment and the thrall of nature.

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden

 

Through April 12

Picturing Mary: Woman, Mother, Idea

For millennia, Mary has been one of the most popular subjects in the history of Western art. This landmark exhibition of more than 60 beautiful depictions of the Virgin Mary explores the concept of womanhood represented by Mary and the power her image has exerted through time.

National Museum of Women in the Arts

 

Through May 3

Piero di Cosimo: The Poetry of Painting in Renaissance Florence

The first major retrospective exhibition of paintings by the imaginative Italian Renaissance master Piero di Cosimo features 44 of the artist's most compelling paintings, including fanciful mythologies, powerful religious works (one on loan for the first time from the church in Italy for which it was created 500 years ago), and sensitive portraits.

National Gallery of Art

 

Through May 10

Man Ray—Human Equations: A Journey from Mathematics to Shakespeare

Highlighting the multimedia work of the legendary Surrealist artist, "Man Ray—Human Equations" explores the intersection of art and science that defined a significant component of modern art on both sides of the Atlantic at the beginning of the 20th century.

The Phillips Collection

 

Through May 10

Hiroshi Sugimoto: Conceptual Forms and Mathematical Models

This exhibition features approximately five photographic works and three sculptures by Hiroshi Sugimoto — one of Japan's most important contemporary artists — inspired by Man Ray's 1930s photographs.

The Phillips Collection

 

Through May 15

Francesco Nonino: Selected Works

Francesco Nonino is one of few Italian photographers whose work has been acquired by both the Library of Congress and the Phillips Collection. The exhibit at the Embassy of Italy will include some recent works from two series: "Come La Vergogna" and "Atmospheres." As an homage to his mother, Italian traditions and to introduce the theme of the upcoming EXPO 2015, some photos of his mother's hands making pasta will also be on display. Viewings are by appointment only; for information visit www.iicwashington.esteri.it.

Embassy of Italy

 

Through May 15

Hands-On Urbanism. The Right to Green

The research-based exhibition is dedicated to the history of the idea of appropriating land in urban space. Since the shockwave of modernization that accompanied industrialization, towns and cities worldwide have had to face some very significant challenges. City-dwellers, who have always found a number of solutions in crisis situations, are involved in bottom-up urban development, as fruit and vegetable gardens led to other forms of collective cohesion, neighborliness and fair distribution.

Embassy of Austria

 

Through May 30

25 Years / 25 Artists

This visual arts exhibition celebrating the Mexican Cultural Institute's first 25 years presents works from several generations and artistic movements. From the contemporaries of the third stage of Mexican muralism, to the members of the "Ruptura" in the 1960s, this exhibit explores art that proposed new forms of expression and changed the way art was seen in Mexico.

Mexican Cultural Institute

 

Through May 31

Style in Chinese Landscape Painting: The Yuan Legacy

Landscape painting is one of the most outstanding achievements of Chinese culture. Key styles in this genre emerged during the Yuan dynasty (1279–1368) and are still followed today.

Freer Gallery of Art

 

Through May 31

The Traveler's Eye: Scenes of Asia

Featuring more than 100 works created over the past five centuries, "The Traveler's Eye: Scenes of Asia" provides glimpses of travels across the Asian continent, from pilgrimages and research trips to expeditions for trade and tourism.

Arthur M. Sackler Gallery

 

Through June 7

Libertad de Expresión: The Art Museum of the Americas and Cold War Politics

Following the creation of the Organization of American States in 1948, its Visual Arts Section, under the direction of Cuban José Gómez Sicre, began an ambitious exhibition program that would further awareness of the art of the Caribbean and Central and South America in the United States. Sicre's support for international modernism also allied him with U.S. Cold War Warriors, who used freedom of expression as a tool in the cultural and intellectual struggle against the Soviets.

Art Museum of the Americas

 

Through June 7

Perspectives: Chiharu Shiota

Performance and installation artist Chiharu Shiota, Japan's representative at the 56th Venice Biennale in 2015, will recreate a monumental yet intimate work in the Sackler pavilion that amasses personal memories through an accumulation of nearly 400 individual shoes, each with a note from the donor describing lost individuals and past moments.

Arthur M. Sackler Gallery

 

Through June 7

Unearthing Arabia: The Archaeological Adventures of Wendell Phillips

Wendell Phillips, a young paleontologist and geologist, headed one of the largest archaeological expeditions to remote South Arabia (present-day Yemen) from 1949 to 1951. Through a selection of unearthed objects as well as film and photography shot by the expedition team, the exhibition highlights Phillips's key finds, recreates his adventures (and misadventures), and conveys the thrill of discovery on this important great archaeological frontier.

Arthur M. Sackler Gallery

 

Through June 14

Zen, Tea, and Chinese Art in Medieval Japan

Zen Buddhism, tea and ink painting — well-known expressions of Japanese culture — have their roots in Chinese arts and ideas brought to medieval Japan from the late 12th to the 16th century. Chinese and Japanese paintings, lacquer ware and ceramics illuminate this remarkable period of cultural contact and synthesis.

Freer Gallery of Art

 

Through Aug. 2

From the Library: Florentine Publishing in the Renaissance

This exhibition presents a variety of books from the late 15th through the early 17th century and explores the development of publishing related to the artistic and scholarly community in Florence.

National Gallery of Art

 

Through Aug. 9

Jacob Lawrence: Struggle ... From the History of the American People

Produced between 1954 and 1956, Jacob Lawrence's "Struggle ... From the History of the American People" portrays scenes from American history, chronicling events from the Revolutionary War through the great westward expansion of 1817.

The Phillips Collection

 

Through Sept. 13

Chief S.O. Alonge: Photographer to the Royal Court of Benin, Nigeria

This retrospective showcases the work of noted Nigerian photographer Chief S.O. Alonge, the first indigenous photographer of the Royal Court of Benin, in conjunction with royal arts from the Benin kingdom. The collection of historic photographs was captured on Kodak glass-plate negatives and documents more than 50 years of the ritual, pageantry and regalia of the obas (kings), their wives and retainers.

National Museum of African Art

 

DANCE

Sat., March 7, 8 p.m.

Tango Buenos Aires: Song of Eva Perón

The renowned Tango Buenos Aires uses the art of tango to journey through the life of Argentina's larger-than-life former first lady, Eva Perón, from her impoverished childhood in the slums to her position as one of the country's most powerful and influential figures. Tickets are $29 to $48.

George Mason University

Center for the Arts

 

DISCUSSIONS

Thu., March 5, 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.

Connecting the Gems of the Indian Ocean: Eastern Africa's 'Swahili' Civilization, Oman and the Gulf

The symposium, in collaboration with the National Museum of African Art, will focus on the historic, commercial and cultural links that existed between the lands of the East African "Swahili" coast, Oman and other countries of the Middle Eastern Gulf region.

Library of Congress

James Madison Building

 

Thu., March 5, 7:30 p.m.

Cecelia Porter: Women Composers and Performers in Vienna, 1918-1945

In this lecture and concert, Dr. Cecelia Porter is joined by Rosa Lamoreaux, resident soprano at the National Gallery of Art, and pianist Stan Engebretson to shed light on three relatively unknown but important female composers in Vienna: Mathilde von Kralik (1857-1944), Johanna Müller-Hermann (1878-1941) and Frida Kern (1891-1988). Admission is free but registration is required; for information visit acfdc.org.

Embassy of Austria

 

Sat., March 7, 9:30 a.m. to 4:15 p.m.

The Legacy of Andrea Palladio

Renaissance Italian architect Andrea Palladio (1508-80) is arguably the most influential architect in the Western world. In this richly illustrated seminar, art historian Bonita Billman traces the hallmarks and features of Palladio's architecture, from the magnificent villas he created in his homeland to the country houses and mansions that were built by great British architects in the era of the European Grand Tour. Tickets are $130; for information visit www.smithsonianassociates.org.

Location TBA

 

Sat., March 14, 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Empires of the Adriatic

Over the centuries, the people along the coast of the Adriatic Sea have known many rulers, but none as disparate as those of the Venetian, Ottoman and Habsburg empires. In this all-day seminar, explore the history and legacy of each of these centers of power with Charles Ingrao, a professor of history at Purdue University. Tickets are $130; for information visit www.smithsonianassociates.org.

S. Dillon Ripley Center

 

Thu., March 19, 6:45 p.m.

Ancient Peru's Mysterious Moche

The origins and collapse of the Moche, an enigmatic Andean civilization that ruled the northern coast of Peru for hundreds of years beginning in the first century A.D., remains a tantalizing puzzle. Haagen Klaus of George Mason University offers insights into the life of this ancient culture, dozens of whose massive pyramids and cities remain to this day. Tickets are $42; for information visit www.smithsonianassociates.org.

S. Dillon Ripley Center

 

Tue., March 31, 6:45 p.m.

Looking West: Ataturk and the Creation of Modern Turkey

In the first half of his lecture, Bulent Atalay describes the conditions prevailing in Europe 500 years ago that led to the extraordinary ascent of the West over the great empires of the East, specifically the Ottoman and Chinese. In the second half, he discusses the revolution that Kemal Ataturk launched in Turkey following World War I that changed the face of the Ottoman Empire. Tickets are $42; for information visit www.smithsonianassociates.org.

S. Dillon Ripley Center

 

MUSIC

Mon., March 2, 6:30 p.m.

The Arakaendar Choir and Orchestra

A great legacy of 7,000 musical scores was preserved for centuries by native musicians in the Jesuit missions of Chiquitos in Santa Cruz, Bolivia. Polish musicologist Father Piotr Nawrot brought them to light and founded the International Festival of Renaissance and Baroque Music of Bolivia, beginning a collaborative partnership that led to the Arakaendar Choir's debut in 2006 (pre-concert talk at 6 p.m.).

Inter-American Development Bank Cultural Center

 

Fri., March 6, 8 p.m.

Danú: 20th Anniversary Tour

To celebrate 20 years of spirited music-making, Danú, an award-winning band hailing from Ireland's historic County Waterford, performs an unforgettable night of lively Celtic music. Tickets are $28 to $46.

George Mason University

Center for the Arts

 

Fri., March 6, 7:30 p.m.

Till Fellner, Piano

The international career and collaborations of Till Fellner, who first garnered attention in 1993 by winning first prize at the Clara Haskil International Piano Competition, reads like a "who's who" of classical music; he has appeared as guest soloist with many of the world's foremost orchestras and has worked with such conductors as Claudio Abbado, Leonard Slatkin and Lothar Zagrosek. Tickets are $70 and include light reception; for information visit www.embassyseries.org.

Embassy of Austria

 

Fri., March 13, 7:30 p.m.

The Minetti Quartet

The Minetti Quartett has collected more important prizes than any ensemble since 2003, when it received the Haydn Award at the International Joseph Haydn Competition in Vienna. It performs a program of Mozart, Shostakovich and Mendelssohn. Tickets are $70 and include light reception; for information visit www.embassyseries.org.

Embassy of Austria

 

Sat., March 14, 8 p.m.

Cristina Pato in Concert

A pop star of the gaita (Spanish bagpipes) in her native Spain and dubbed by the Wall Street Journal as "one of the living masters of the gaita," Cristina Pato's musical influences of jazz and Latin sounds represent a portion of her commitment to cultural exchange. Tickets are $25.

Sixth and I

 

Tue., March 17, 8 p.m.

Carlos Núñez with the Sean Culkin Dancers

Phenomenal multi-instrumentalist Carloz Núñez grew up in Galicia in northern Spain—home to ancient civilizations whose Celtic traditions predated those of Scotland and Ireland, and to the Galician bagpipe, of which Núñez is the acknowledged world master. Please call for ticket information.

Music Center at Strathmore

 

Tue., March 17, 8 p.m.

Zakir Hussain: Celtic Connections

Tabla master Zakir Hussain has long explored other cultures, and his newest project, "Celtic Connections," makes its U.S. tour debut, pairing the beautiful and flowing melodies of Celtic instruments including bodhran, violin, pipes, flutes and whistles with tabla, bamboo flute and Carnatic (south Indian) violin. Tickets are $22 to $39.

GW Lisner Auditorium

 

Thu., March 19, 7:30 p.m.

EUNIC Concert Series: Yumeto Suenaga

The EUNIC Concert Series and American University present French classical pianist, Yumeto Suenaga. who was born in Paris in 1981 to painters and is of French-Japanese origin. The EUNIC Concert Series gives young emerging artists from Europe a platform to perform in Washington, D.C. Ticket are $15; for information visit acfdc.org.

Embassy of Austria

 

Tue., March 31, 7:30 p.m.

Florian Feilmair, Piano

"Sensitivity and a wealth of nuances," "pearly ease and aplomb" — these are a few of the traits critics have attributed to the young pianist Florian Feilmair, who has already captured a considerable number of important prizes. Admission is free but registration is required; for information visit acfdc.org.

Embassy of Austria

 

Tue., March 31, 7:30 p.m.

Nikolay Khozyainov, Piano

Born in Blagoveshchensk, a city in Russian Far East in 1992, Nikolay Khozyainov began to play the piano at the age of 5 and went on to study at the Central Musical School of the Moscow Tchaikovsky Conservatory. He performs a repertoire of Haydn, Chopin, Tchaikovsky and Rachmaninov. Tickets are $175 and include Russian buffet and free valet; for information visit www.embassyseries.org.

Russian Residence

 

THEATER

March 6 to April 26

The Originalist

Four-time Helen Hayes Award winner Edward Gero stars as Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia in a daring world premiere about the brilliant, but polarizing justice, his bright, new, liberal clerk, and their clash over one of the most incendiary cases ever to reach the nation's highest court. Tickets are $55 to $90.

Arena Stage

 

March 7 to 21

The Flying Dutchman

In this Washington National Opera revival, formidable bass-baritone and Grammy winner Eric Owens makes his staged role debut in Wagner's retelling of the nautical legend, about a captain condemned to wander the seas in search of unconditional love. Tickets are $25 to $300.

Kennedy Center Opera House

 

Through March 8

King Hedley II

With an angry scar down the length of his face and seven years of prison haunting him, King has a chance to lock away his past and achieve an entrepreneurial dream, but Pittsburgh's Hill District is an unforgiving place. Tickets are $45 to $90.

Arena Stage

 

Through March 8

Mary Stuart

Mary Stuart, Queen of Scotland, has been imprisoned under charges of attempted regicide. Her captor and cousin Queen Elizabeth I cannot bring herself to sign the death decree. In a society where women are considered inferior, these two queens charged with ruling as kings battle sexism, greed, lust and each other in Peter Oswald's bold new translation of Friedrich Schiller's "Mary Stuart." Tickets are $40 to $75.

Folger Shakespeare Library

 

Through March 8

No Hay Que Llorar

(No Need to Cry)

Teatro de la Luna's hilarious comedy, in Argentina's Grotesque genre, unfolds as a family comes together at a reunion to celebrate their matriarch's birthday. The mother's greed and the non-conformance, selfishness and deceit at the gathering reveal the true and gritty feel of this middle-class family, with alarming hints at decay. Tickets are $20 to $35.

Gunston Arts Center

 

Through March 10

Dialogues of the Carmelites

Faith is put to the ultimate test in Poulenc's powerful opera about an order of Carmelite nuns who refuse to renounce their beliefs during the French Revolution. Washington National Opera Artistic Director Francesca Zambello directs this company premiere, sung in English. Tickets are $25 to $300.

Kennedy Center

 

March 11 to April 19

Laugh

Out West in the 1920s, a dynamite accident at a gold mine leaves young Mabel wealthy but orphaned. She's shipped off to a calculating aunt whose nephew is charged with seducing her to control Mabel's fortune — a hapless courtship reveals a shared love of silent movies and a plan for greater things. Tickets are $44 to $88.

Studio Theatre

 

March 13 to May 20

Freedom's Song

This epic musical features the words of Abraham Lincoln and music inspired by the letters of those who lived through the Civil War, evoking the soaring hopes and tragic losses of real people through a series of highly theatrical vignettes. Tickets are $20 to $69.

Ford's Theatre

 

March 14 to 23

Don Giovanni

The In Series's opera season continues with Mozart and DaPonte's masterpiece, "Don Giovanni," a dramma giocoso (comedic tragedy) based on the legend of the infamous libertine and his supernatural stone guest, which is universally listed among the most perfect opera in the repertory. Please call for ticket information.

GALA Hispanic Theatre

 

Through March 15

The Metromaniacs

Mistaken identity, misplaced ardor and a fight for true love ensues in Alexis Piron's classic 1738 French farce, in which would-be poet Damis has fallen for the works of the mysterious Breton poetess, not knowing she is really middle-age gentleman Francalou. Tickets are $20 to $110.

Shakespeare Lansburgh Theatre

 

March 17 to April 26

Man of La Mancha

As Miguel de Cervantes presents his tale of knight errant Don Quixote, his journey comes alive in a play-within-the-play, featuring loyal friends, troubled maidens, giant monsters and brave knights. Please call for ticket information.

Shakespeare Theatre

Sidney Harman Hall

 

Through March 22

Kid Victory

Seventeen-year-old Luke returns home after vanishing a year ago. Profoundly changed, Luke and his parents struggle to adjust to life following his disappearance. Please call for ticket information.

Signature Theatre

 

Through March 22

Much Ado About Nothing

Confirmed bachelor Benedick and the equally spirited and unwed Beatrice will spar, court and conspire in Synetic's 11th "Wordless Shakespeare" adaptation — a flirtatious and fiercely funny show set in 1950s Las Vegas. Tickets start at $35.

Synetic Theater

   

Classifieds - March 2015

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

diplomat.classifieds1.march15

diplomat.classifieds2.march15

   

Real Estate Classifieds - March 2015

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

diplomat.real.classifieds1.march15

diplomat.real.classifieds2.march15

   

Follow The Diplomat: icon-facebook icon-twitter icon-linkedin icon-rss instagram