Print
Print
Increase Text Size Text Reset Decrease Text Size

Films - July 2017

Languages

Cantonese

Hebrew

Russian


English

Inuktitut

Spanish


French

Italian

Swedish

German

Mandarin

Thai

 

Cantonese


Mad World

Directed by Wong Chun

(Hong Kong, 2016, 101 min.)

A former stockbroker is released into the custody of his father after being institutionalized for bipolar disorder in this moving, award-winning drama that explores the many issues facing Hong Kongers today, from the harsh living conditions of the poor to the immense pressure to succeed in business.

National Museum of American History

Fri., July 14, 7 p.m.

 

Mrs. K

Directed by Ho Yuhang

(Malaysia/Hong Kong, 2016, 97 min.)

Kara Wai plays a retired assassin now living comfortably as a housewife. When her past comes back to haunt her in the form of a former criminal associate, Mrs. K must dust off her martial arts skills to dispatch a parade of baddies (Cantonese, Mandarin and Malay).

National Museum of American History

Sun., July 23, 3:30 p.m.

 

Three

Directed by Johnnie To

(Hong Kong, 2016, 98 min.)

The latest thriller from action master Johnnie To takes place almost entirely in a hospital, where a neurosurgeon must treat a gangster with a bullet lodged in his head. The hospitalized criminal may have incriminating information on the ruthless cop who brought him in.

National Museum of American History

Sun., July 23, 1 p.m.

 

Trivisa

Directed by Jevons Au, Vicky Wong Kai-Kit, ] Frank Hui

(Hong Kong, 2016, 97 min.)

Loosely based on the lives of actual Hong Kong gangsters, the film weaves together three tales of criminal derring-do played out against the backdrop of the 1997 British handover of Hong Kong to China.

National Museum of American History

Sun., July 16, 1 p.m.

 

Vampire Cleanup Department

Directed by Hang Chiu and Anthony Yan

(Hong Kong, 2017, 93 min.)

After surviving a vampire attack, mild-mannered millennial Tim discovers that he is part of a centuries-old organization of vampire hunters, now working undercover as trash collectors. But what happens when he falls in love with a particularly cute bloodsucker named Summer?

National Museum of American History

Sun., July 16, 3:30 p.m.

 

English

Abacus: Small Enough to Fail

Directed by Steve James

(U.S., 2017, 88 min.)

Accused of mortgage fraud, Abacus becomes the only U.S. bank to face criminal charges in the wake of the 2008 financial crisis. The indictment and subsequent trial forces the Sung family to defend themselves – and their bank's legacy in the Chinatown community – over the course of a five-year legal battle.

Landmark's E Street Cinema

 

Atomic Blonde

Directed by David Leitch

(U.S., 2017, 115 min.)

An undercover MI6 agent (Charlize Theron) is sent to Berlin during the Cold War to investigate the murder of a fellow agent and recover a missing list of double agents.

Angelika Mosaic

Opens Fri., July 28

 

Baby Driver

Directed by Edgar Wright

(U.K./U.S., 2017, 113 min.)

In this stylish, action-packed crime drama, a talented young getaway driver relies on the beat of his personal soundtrack to be the best in the game. When he meets the girl of his dreams, Baby sees a chance to ditch his criminal life and make a clean getaway. But after being coerced into working for a crime boss, he must face the music when a doomed heist threatens his life, love and freedom.

Angelika Mosaic

Atlantic Plumbing Cinema

 

Beatriz at Dinner

Directed by Miguel Arteta

(U.S., 2017, 83 min.)

At an elegant dinner party, conversation between Beatriz (Salma Hayek), a self-effacing and spiritual immigrant from Mexico, and a hard-nosed businessman explodes into a bitter clash of cultures.

AFI Silver Theatre

Angelika Mosaic

Landmark's E Street Cinema

 

The Beguiled

Directed by Sofia Coppola

(U.S., 2017, 94 min.)

At a girls' school in Virginia during the Civil War, where the young women have been sheltered from the outside world, a wounded Union soldier is taken in. Soon, the house is taken over with sexual tension, rivalries and an unexpected turn of events.

AFI Silver Theatre

Angelika Mosaic

Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinema

Landmark's E Street Cinema

 

The Big Sick

Directed by Michael Showalter

(U.S., 2017, 119 min.)

Pakistan-born aspiring comedian Kumail connects with grad student Emily after one of his standup sets. However, what they thought would be just a one-night stand blossoms into the real thing, which complicates the life that is expected of Kumail by his traditional Muslim parents (English and Urdu).

Angelika Mosaic

Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinema

Landmark's E Street Cinema

 

Casablanca

Directed by Michael Curtiz

(U.S., 1942, 102 min.)

Why is he in Casablanca? "I was misinformed," explains nightclub owner/war refugee Humphrey Bogart, who won't "stick his neck out for nobody" — until Ingrid Bergman walks in.

AFI Silver Theatre

June 30 to July 6

 

My Cousin Rachel

Directed by Roger Michell

(U.S./U.K., 2017, 106 min.)

A young Englishman plots revenge against his mysterious, beautiful cousin, believing that she murdered his guardian. But his feelings become complicated as he finds himself falling under the beguiling spell of her charms.

Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinema

Landmark's E Street Cinema

 

Dunkirk

Directed by Christopher Nolan

(U.S./U.K./France/Netherlands, 2017, 107 min.)

Allied soldiers from Belgium, the British Empire, Canada and France are surrounded by the German army and evacuated during a fierce battle in World War II.

AFI Silver Theatre

Angelika Mosaic

Opens Fri., July 21

 

The Exception

Directed by David Leveaux

(U.K./U.S., 2017, 107 min.)

This riveting World War II thriller follows German soldier Stefan as he goes on a mission to investigate exiled German Monarch Kaiser Wilhelm II who lives in a secluded mansion in the Netherlands. As Stefan begins to infiltrate the Kaiser's life, he finds himself drawn into an unexpected and passionate romance with one of the Kaiser's maids whom he soon discovers is secretly Jewish.

The Avalon Theatre

 

A Ghost Story

Directed by David Lowery

(U.S., 2017, 87 min.)

In this singular exploration of legacy, love, loss and the enormity of existence, a recently deceased, white-sheeted ghost returns to his suburban home to try to reconnect with his bereft wife.

Angelika Mosaic

Opens Fri., July 14

 

Lady Macbeth

Directed by William Oldroyd

(U.K., 2017, 89 min.)

Set in 19th-century rural England, young bride who has been sold into marriage to a middle-aged man discovers an unstoppable desire within herself as she enters into an affair with a worker on her estate.

Angelika Mosaic

Opens Fri., July 21

 

The Lady from Shanghai

Directed by Orson Welles

(U.S., 1947, 87 min.)

Footloose Irish sailor Orson Welles gets mixed up in a murder with crooked lawyer Everett Sloane and his sultry wife, Rita Hayworth (then Mrs. Welles). Byzantine plot twists and hypnotic spectacles ensue, including would-be lovers discussing a murder plot as an aquarium's shark swims behind them.

AFI Silver Theatre

July 2 to 6

 

The Little Hours

Directed by Jeff Baena

(Canada/U.S., 2017, 90 min.)

In this irreverent comedy, a group of medieval nuns spend their days chafing at monastic routine, spying on one another and berating the estate's day laborer. After a particularly vicious insult session drives the peasant away, a virile young servant is introduced to the sisters as a deaf-mute to discourage temptation but soon struggles to maintain his cover as the repressed nunnery erupts in a whirlwind of pansexual horniness, substance abuse and wicked revelry.

Landmark's E Street Cinema

Opens Fri., July 7

 

Manifesto

Directed by Julian Rosefeldt

(Germany/Australia, 2017, 95 min.)

"Manifesto" features two-time Academy Award-winner Cate Blanchett in 13 astonishing roles that span the gamut of humanity — from punk rocker to anchorwoman, from homeless man to mother delivering Sunday grace before family dinner, from puppeteer to factory worker.

Landmark's E Street Cinema

 

Maudie

Directed by Aisling Walsh

(Ireland/Canada, 2017, 115 min.)

An arthritic Nova Scotia woman works as a housekeeper while she hones her skills as an artist and eventually becomes a beloved figure in the community — and with the hardened reclusive bachelor for whom she works.

Angelika Mosaic

Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinema

Landmark's E Street Cinema

 

Paris Can Wait
(Bonjour Anne)

Directed by Eleanor Coppola

(U.S., 2016, 92 min.)

Anne is at a crossroads in her life. Long married to a successful, driven but inattentive movie producer, she unexpectedly finds herself taking a car trip from Cannes to Paris with a business associate of her husband. What should be a seven-hour drive turns into a carefree two-day adventure replete with diversions that reawaken her lust for life.

Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinema

West End Cinema

 

Stories We Tell

Directed by Sarah Polley

(Canada, 2013, 108 min.)

Actor and director Sarah Polley addresses the complicated mystery of her mother's life in this rousing mix of memoir, interview, reconnaissance and copious Super-8 home-movie footage, both real and staged.

National Gallery of Art

Tue., July 4, 3 p.m.

 

Wonder Woman

Directed by Patty Jenkins

(U.S./China/Hong Kong, 2017, 141 min.)

Before she was Wonder Woman she was Diana, princess of the Amazons, trained warrior. When a pilot crashes and tells of conflict in the outside world, she leaves home to fight a war to end all wars, discovering her full powers and true destiny (English and German).

Angelika Mosaic

Atlantic Plumbing Cinema

Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinema

French

Fanny's Journey

Directed by Lola Doillon

(Belgium/France, 2016, 94 min.)

In 1943, 13-year-old Fanny and her younger sisters were sent from their home in France to a foster home for Jewish children in Italy. When the Nazis arrive in Italy, their caretakers desperately organize the departure of the children to Switzerland. Suddenly left on their own, these 11 children will do the impossible to reach the Swiss border in order to survive.

Edlavitch DCJCC

Tue., July 11, 7:30 p.m.

 

The Midwife

Directed by Martin Provost

(France, 2017, 117 min.)

Two of French cinema's biggest stars shine in this bittersweet drama about the unlikely friendship that develops between Claire (Catherine Frot), a talented but tightly wound midwife, and Béatrice (Catherine Deneuve), the estranged, free-spirited mistress of Claire's late father.

The Avalon Theatre

Opens Fri., July 21

 

Moka

Directed by Frédéric Mermoud

(Switzerland/France, 2016, 89 min.)

This tightly-paced, suspenseful psychological thriller stars Emmanuelle Devos as Diane, a grieving, obsessed woman who tracks down the hit-and-run driver of the Mercedes she thinks killed her son and devastated her life. In order to get closer to her suspects, Diane pretends to be a potential buyer for the car with the owner, and separately strikes up a seeming friendship with his partner, Marlene.

Landmark's Theatres

Opens Fri., July 7

 

German


Lessons of a Dream
(Der ganz grosse Traum)

Directed by Sebastian Grobler

(Germany, 2011, 113 min.)

Based on the true story of the teacher and football pioneer Konrad Koch, "Lessons of a Dream" relates the story of the beginnings of football in Germany, and of a school class that develops into a real team when they are infected with their new teacher's football fever.

Goethe-Institut

Fri., July 28, 6:30 p.m.

 

Hebrew


The Wedding Plan
(Laavor et hakir)

Directed by Rama Burshtein

(Israel, 2016, 110 min.)

Exhausted by single life at 32, spirited bride-to-be Michal is eager for the comfort and companionship of marriage. Then, her fiancé dumps her one month before their wedding. Devastated but undeterred, Michal, an Orthodox Jew, decides to keep her wedding date, leaving it to God to provide a suitable groom.

Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinema

 

The Women's Balcony

Directed by Emil Ben-Shimon

(Israel, 2017, 96 min.)

When the women's balcony in an Orthodox synagogue collapses, leaving the rabbi's wife in a coma and the rabbi in shock, the congregation falls into crisis. A charismatic young rabbi appears to be a savior after the accident, but slowly starts pushing his fundamentalist ways and tries to take control. This tests the women's friendships and creates an almost Lysistrata-type rift between the community's women and men.

Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinema

 

Inuktitut


Atanarjuat: The Fast Runner

Directed by Zacharias Kunuk

(Canada, 2001, 172 min.)

Written and spoken entirely in Inuit, the narrative is a mix of drama, myth, and oral tradition that, in its sense of verisimilitude, resembles a documentary, yet is a fictional tale (employing amateur actors) about an ancient evil disrupting a remote settlement in the Arctic.

National Gallery of Art

Sat., July 8, 2 p.m.

 

Italian

Like Crazy
(La pazza gioia)

Directed by Paolo Virzi

(Italy/France, 2016,

Beatrice is a motor-mouthed fantasist, a self-styled billionaire countess who likes to believe she's on intimate terms with world leaders. Donatella is a tattooed introvert, a fragile young woman locked in her own mystery. The two women form an unlikely friendship as they flee the mental institution in search of love and happiness in the outside world.

The Avalon Theatre

Wed., July 5, 8 p.m.

 

Mandarin

Soul Mate

Directed by Derek Tsang

(China, 2016, 110 min.)

Young actresses Zhou Dongyu and Ma Sichun deliver intense, emotionally raw performances as high school friends whose relationship is strained when they both fall in love with the handsome Jiaming. Years later, old wounds are reopened when one of them publishes a novel based on their lives.

National Museum of American History

Sun., July 30, 2 p.m.

 

Russian

Moscow Never Sleeps

Directed by Johnny O'Reilly

(Russia/Ireland, 2017, 100 min.)

Irish writer/director Johnny O'Reilly, who lived in Moscow for twelve years, has made a compelling Russian drama telling the story of five interlocking characters on a single day, the Moscow City Day holiday, celebrated with parades and fireworks. Like a Russian "Crash," the film dives headlong into the volatile intersections and intimate lives of five people, including an entrepreneur whose business comes under siege by bureaucrats and a teenage girl mired in the misery of a broken home.

Landmark's Theatres

 

Spanish

Endless Poetry
(Poesía sin fin)

Directed by Alejandro Jodorowsky

(Chile/France, 2016, 128 min.)

Through the intensely personal lens of writer/director Alejandro Jodorowsky comes the story of his years spent as an aspiring poet in Chile in the 1940s — replete with Jodorowsky's wonderfully imaginative, surreal and psychedelic imagery.

Landmark's Theatres

Opens Fri., July 28

 

Swedish

Sami Blood

Directed by Amanda Kernell

(Sweden/Norway/Denmark, 2017,

In this emotionally-charged drama, primarily set in the 1930s, 14-year-old Elle, a reindeer-breeding girl from the Sami (Lapp) community in northern Sweden, is forcibly sent to a boarding school by the state in order to learn the Swedish language and culture. Taken from the untamed wilderness to an urban world, trying to fit in, she is exposed to racism and humiliating race biology examinations. Despite the prejudice of many, the compassion of a few shines through, offering Elle a sense of hope in her otherwise bleak world (Swedish and Sami).

West End Cinema

 

Thai

Pop Aye

Directed by Kirsten Tan

(Thailand/Singapore, 2017, 102 min.)

On a chance encounter, a disenchanted architect bumps into his long-lost elephant from his childhood on the streets of Bangkok. Excited, he takes his elephant on a journey across Thailand, in search of the farm where they grew up together.

Landmark's Theatres

Opens Fri., July 21