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Films - June 2018

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Languages

Burmese

Finnish

Portuguese


Catalan

French

Spanish


Czech

Japanese

English

Mandarin

 

Burmese

14 Apples
Directed by Midi Z
(Taiwan/Myanmar, 2018, 84 min.)

Wang Shin-hong is suffering from insomnia. A fortuneteller advises the Mandalay businessman to spend 14 days in a monastery, living as a monk and eating an apple a day. During his fleeting role as the monks' advisor, he soon learns of the villagers' attempts to survive and make a living as legal or illegal migrants in China, Thailand or Malaysia. He also finds out how the other monks try to generate profit and additional income (director in person).

Freer Gallery of Art
Sun., June 10, 2 p.m.

 

City of Jade
Directed by Midi Z
(Taiwan/Myanmar, 2016, 99 min.)

Director Midi Z was only 5 years old when his oldest brother, Zhao, abandoned the family at age 16. There were rumors that he'd found riches in the mythical "City of Jade." When he reappeared, Zhao was poor and addicted to opium. Years later, weak but still hopeful of finding a big jade gemstone to become rich overnight, Zhao set off once again for the mines — with Midi and his camera in tow — just like countless others in Myanmar's war-torn Kachin State on the border with China (Burmese and Mandarin).

Freer Gallery of Art
Sat., June 9, 2 p.m.

 

Catalan

Summer 1993
Directed by Carla Simón
(Spain, 2018, 97 min.)

After her mother's death, 6-year-old Frida is sent from Barcelona to her uncle's family to live with them in the idyllic Catalan countryside. But Frida finds it hard to forget her mother and adapt to her new life.

Landmark's E Street Cinema

Czech

Black Peter
(Cerny Petr)
Directed by Miloš Forman
(Czech Republic, 1963, 85 min.)

Marking Oscar-winning director Miloš Forman's debut, "Black Peter" centers on a shy young store clerk assigned to apprehend shoplifters but lacks the nerve to confront anyone. This coming of age story explores summer in a small Czech town during the 1960s. To register, visit https://blackpeter.eventbrite.com.

Embassy of the Czech Republic
Wed., June 6, 6 p.m.

Masaryk
Directed by Julius Sevcík
(Czech Republic/Slovakia/Germany, 2017, 114 min.)

Just before World War II breaks out, Jan Masaryk serves as Czechoslovak ambassador in London. He desperately tries to save his homeland from Nazi occupation, appealing to his French and British allies. Their betrayal is an ultimate slap in the face. Left without a nation, Jan flees to America, wanting to forget the world in a psychiatric ward. However, a German psychiatrist and a beautiful journalist encourage him to continue the fight to help his nation.

The Avalon Theatre
Wed., June 13, 8 p.m.

 

English

Adrift
Directed by Baltasar Kormákur
(U.S., 2018)

Based on the true story of survival, a young couple's chance encounter leads them first to love, and then on the adventure of a lifetime as they face one of the most catastrophic hurricanes in recorded history.

Angelika Mosaic
Opens Fri., June 1

 

American Animals
Directed by Bart Layton
(U.K./U.S., 2018, 116 min.)

"American Animals" is the unbelievable but entirely true story of four young men who attempt to execute one of the most audacious art heists in U.S. history.

Angelika Mosaic
Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinem
Opens Fri., June 8

 

Beast
Directed by Michael Pearce

(U.K., 2018, 107 min.)

A troubled woman living in an isolated community finds herself pulled between the control of her oppressive family and the allure of a secretive outsider suspected of a series of brutal murders.

Angelika Mosaic
Landmark's E Street Cinema

 

Beirut
Directed by Brad Anderson
(U.S., 2018)

A U.S. diplomat flees Lebanon in 1972 after a tragic incident. Ten years later, he is called back to war-torn Beirut by a CIA operative to negotiate for the life of a friend he left behind.

West End Cinema

 

Book Club
Directed by Bill Holderman
(U.S., 2018, 104 min.)

Four lifelong friends have their lives forever changed after reading "50 Shades of Grey" in their monthly book club.

Angelika Mosaic
Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinema

 

Boundaries
Directed by Shana Feste
(Canada/U.S., 2018, 104 min.)

Laura and her son Henry are forced to drive her estranged, pot-dealing, carefree father Jack across country after being kicked out of a nursing home.

Angelika Mosaic
Opens Fri., June 29

 

Breath
Directed by Simon Baker
(Australia, 2018, 115 min.)

Set in mid-70s coastal Australia, two teenage boys, hungry for discovery, form an unlikely friendship with a mysterious older adventurer who pushes them to take risks that will have a lasting and profound impact on their lives.

Angelika Pop-Up
Opens Fri., June 8

 

The Death of Stalin
Directed by Armando Iannucci
(U.K./Canada/France/Belgium, 2018, 107 min.)

Moscow, 1953: when tyrannical dictator Joseph Stalin drops dead, his parasitic cronies square off in a frantic power struggle to be the next Soviet leader in this uproarious, wickedly irreverent satire.

Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinema
Landmark's E Street Cinema

 

Disobedience
Directed by Sebastián Lelio
(Ireland/U.K./U.S., 2018, 114 min.)

Rachel Weisz stars as a woman who returns to the orthodox Jewish community that shunned her for decades earlier because of her attraction to a childhood friend (Rachel McAdams). Once back, passions between the two women reignite as they explore the boundaries of faith and sexuality.

Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinema
Landmark's E Street Cinema

 

First Reformed
Directed by Paul Schrader
(U.S., 2018, 108 min.)

Reverend Ernst Toller is a solitary, middle-aged parish pastor at a small Dutch Reform church in upstate New York on the cusp of celebrating its 250th anniversary. When a pregnant parishioner asks him to counsel her husband, a radical environmentalist, the clergyman finds himself plunged into his own tormented past, and equally despairing future, until he finds redemption in an act of grandiose violence.

Angelika Mosaic
Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinema
Landmark's E Street Cinema

 

Guardians of the Earth
Directed by Filip Antoni Malinowski
(Austria/Germany, 2017, 86 min.)

In December 2015, after 21 years of endless U.N. climate change negotiations, 195 nations — and 20,000 negotiators — met at a private airport shielded by the military in the north of Paris for a last attempt to save our planet (English, German, French and Bengali; followed by discussion with the filmmaker).

Embassy of Austria
Thu., June 21, 7 p.m.

 

Heat and Dust
Directed by James Ivory
(U.K., 1983, 133 min.)

Seeking to unravel the mystery surrounding a long-ago affair between her aunt and an Indian prince, Anne (Julie Christie) becomes immersed in the local culture, where the pull of the past simultaneously leads to a clearer view of her own future (English, Urdu and Hindi).

Freer Gallery of Art
Sun., June 24, 2 p.m.

 

Isle of Dogs
Directed by Wes Anderson
(U.S./Germany, 2018, 101 min.)

This animated adventure follows Atari Kobayashi, a 12-year-old ward to corrupt Mayor Kobayashi. When, by executive decree, all the canine pets of Megasaki City are exiled to a vast garbage-dump called Trash Island, Atari sets off alone in a miniature Junior-Turbo Prop and flies across the river in search of his bodyguard-dog.

Landmark's E Street Cinema

 

Little Pink House
Directed by Courtney Balaker
(Canada/U.S., 2018, 98 min.)

A small-town nurse named Susette Kelo emerges as the reluctant leader of her working-class neighbors in their struggle to save their homes from political and corporate interests bent on seizing the land and handing it over to Pfizer Corp.

Landmark's E Street Cinema
Opens Fri., June 1

 

Mountain
Directed by Jennifer Peedom
(Australia, 2018, 74 min.)

Narrated by Willem Dafoe, "Mountain" is a dazzling exploration of our obsession with mountains. Where once their remoteness protected their purity, mountains have today become theatres for recreation. But their greatest value lies in their power to inspire wonder and awe: to remind us of the limits of our schemes and ambition.

Landmark's Theatres
Opens Fri., June 8

 

Ocean's 8
Directed by Gary Ross
(U.S., 2018, 105 min.)

Every con has its pros. Debbie Ocean (Sandra Bullock) gathers a crew of eight women to attempt an impossible heist at New York City's yearly Met Gala in this suspenseful and humorous criminal adventure.

Atlantic Plumbing Cinema
Opens Fri., June 8

 

On Chesil Beach
Directed by Dominic Cooke
(U.K., 2018, 105 min.)

Saoirse Ronan stars in this drama centered on a young couple of drastically different backgrounds in the summer of 1962. Following the pair through their idyllic courtship, the film explores sex and societal pressure that can accompany physical intimacy, leading to an awkward and fateful wedding night.

Angelika Mosaic
Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinem
Landmark's E Street Cinema

 

Pope Francis – A Man of His Word
Directed by Wim Wenders
(Switzerland/Holy See/Italy/Germany/France, 2018, 96 min.)

A rare co-production with the Vatican, the pope's ideas and his message are central to the film, which sets out to present his work of reform and his answers to today's global questions from death, social justice, immigration, ecology, wealth inequality, materialism and the role of the family (English, Italian, Spanish and German).

Angelika Mosaic
Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinem
West End Cinema

 

RBG
Directed by Julie Cohen and Betsy West
(U.S., 2018, 97 min.)

At the age of 84, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has developed a breathtaking legal legacy while becoming an unexpected pop culture icon. But without a definitive Ginsburg biography, the unique personal journey of this diminutive, quiet warrior's rise to the nation's highest court has been largely unknown, even to some of her biggest fans—until now.

Angelika Mosaic
Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinem
Landmark's E Street Cinema

 

The Seagull
Directed by Michael Mayer
(U.S., 2018, 98 min.)

One summer at a lakeside Russian estate, friends and family gather for a weekend in the countryside. While everyone is caught up in passionately loving someone who loves somebody else, a tragicomedy unfolds about art, fame, human folly, and the eternal desire to live a purposeful life.

Angelika Mosaic
Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinema

 

Shakespeare Wallah
Directed by James Ivor
(U.S., 1965, 120 min.)

In the final days of English colonial rule, the Buckingham Players, a traveling theater group in India, try to uphold British tradition by staging Shakespeare plays for the general public, boarding schools, and local royalty, but they are unable to compete with the wildly popular Bollywood film industry (English and Hindi).

Freer Gallery of Art
Fri., June 22, 7 p.m.

 

Soller's Point
Directed by Matthew Porterfield
(U.S., 2018, 101 min.)

A small-time drug dealer under house arrest at the home of his father in Baltimore re-enters a community scarred by unemployment, neglect and deeply entrenched segregation.

West End Cinema

 

Won't You Be My Neighbor?
Directed by Morgan Neville
(U.S., 2018, 94 min.)

For over 30 years, Fred Rogers, an unassuming minister, puppeteer, writer and producer, was beamed daily into homes across America. In his beloved television program, "Mister Rogers' Neighborhood," Fred and his cast of puppets and friends spoke directly to young children about some of life's weightiest issues, in a simple, direct fashion.

Angelika Mosaic
Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinem
Opens Fri., June 8

Finnish

Loviisa
Directed by Valentin Vaala
(Finland, 1946, 85 min.)

A tale of love between young Juhani Niskavuori and a local dairy worker, "Loviisa" focuses on the family's frustration triggered by their affair.

National Gallery of Art
Sat., June 23, 2 p.m.

 

Shadows in Paradise
Directed by Aki Kaurismäki
(Finland, 1986, 74 min.)

In gray, class-conscious Helsinki, Nikander is a stoic, solitary garbage man. Cigarettes, coffee, bingo games, and English lessons border his circumscribed life. Ilona, a supermarket clerk who frequently loses her job, bandages Nikander's hand one evening and they begin an on-again off-again relationship (Finnish, Swedish and English; screens with "Le Havre").

National Gallery of Art
Sun., June 24, 4 p.m.

 

The Unknown Soldier
Directed by Edvin Laine
(Finland, 1955, 169 min.)

In the summer of 1941, a Finnish machine gun company receives an order to turn in their surplus equipment. The next morning the soldiers wake to the sound of guns — and war. The young, nervous rookies of the company get their baptism of fire, and the men become familiar with death and the hardships of war.

National Gallery of Art
Sun., June 10, 4 p.m.

 

French

Disobedience – The Sousa Mendes Story
Directed by Joël Santoni
(France, 2009, 104 min.)

Aristides Sousa Mendes, the Portuguese consul in Bordeaux, disobeys his superiors and issues visas that allowed thousands of people, mostly Jews, to escape the Nazis when they invaded France in 1940 (French, Yiddish and Portuguese; Portuguese wine and beer available prior to screening; Q&A follows).

The Avalon Theatre
Thu., June 21, 6:30 p.m.

 

Double Lover
Directed by François Ozon
(France/Belgium, 2017, 108 min.)

Chloé, a fragile young woman, falls in love with her psychoanalyst, Paul. A few months later she moves in with him, but soon discovers that her lover is concealing a part of his identity.

The Avalon Theatre
Wed., June 20, 8 p.m.

 

Let the Sunshine In
Directed by Claire Denis
(France/Belgium, 2017, 94 min.)

Juliette Binoche delivers a luminous performance in the deliciously witty, sensuously romantic film as a divorced Parisian painter searching for another shot at love, but refusing to settle for the parade of all-too-flawed men who drift in and out of her life.

Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinema

 

Le Havre
Directed by Aki Kaurismäki
(Finland/France/Germany, 2011, 93 min.)

When an African boy arrives by cargo ship in the port city of Le Havre, an aging shoe shiner takes pity on the child and welcomes him into his home (screens with "Shadows in Paradise").

National Gallery of Art
Sun., June 24, 4 p.m.


Japanese

Drunken Angel
Directed by Akira Kurosawa
(Japan, 1948, 98 min.)

In this powerful early noir from the great Akira Kurosawa, Toshiro Mifune bursts onto the screen as a volatile, tubercular criminal who strikes up an unlikely relationship with a jaded physician.

Freer Gallery of Art
Wed., June 6, 2 p.m.


Mandarin

The Road to Mandalay
Directed by Midi Z
(Taiwan/Myanmar/France/Germany, 2016, 108 min.)

The film centers on two Burmese illegal immigrants trying to build lives for themselves on the margins of society in Thailand. This slow-burning love story looks at one of today's most pressing global issues through a deeply personal lens (Mandarin, Thai and Burmese).

Freer Gallery of Art
Fri., June 8, 7 p.m.


Portuguese

Nossa Chape
Directed by Jeff and Michael Zimbalist
(Brazil, 2018, 101 min.)

This compelling documentary tracks the rebuilding of the Chapecoense football club in Brazil after an airplane carrying the team crashed in November 2016, leaving all but three of the players dead. As the team flies the same fated route to play the final championship game that last year's team would have played, they must unite around a common identity.

The Avalon Theatre
Opens Fri., June 8

 

Spanish

Abracadabra
Directed by Pablo Berger
(Spain, 2017, 96 min.)

an ordinary couple from Madrid — Carmen is a devoted homemaker and Carlos is a construction worker attend their nephew's wedding, Carmen's cousin sees a chance to demonstrate his amateur hypnosis act, with Carlos as the guinea pig. As Carlos steps onstage, an unwanted spirit crashes the show.

AFI Silver Theatre
Sat., June 2, 7:15 p.m.

 

Anchor and Hope
Directed by Carlos Marques-Marcet
(Spain/U.K., 2017, 111 min.)

Eva and Kat are a couple coming to terms with the death of their cat when Kat's close friend Roger comes to stay. Space is tight on their London houseboat, and Eva is not happy to have the gregarious, womanizing Roger impinging on their space. But then she hits on a plan that will bind the three of them (Spanish and English).

AFI Silver Theatre
Sun., June 3, 7 p.m.

 

Constructing Albert
Directed by Laura Collado
(Spain/Estonia, 2017, 82 min.)

Chef Albert Adrià wants his restaurants to surprise, stir emotions and, of course, entertain. He views each of his dramatically different eateries — an experimental cocktail bar, a taqueria, a vermouth bar, a tapas bar, a Japanese-Peruvian restaurant — as if he is a film auteur experimenting across genres.

AFI Silver Theatre
Sat., June 2, 5:15 p.m.

 

Hopelessly Devout
Directed by Marta Díaz de Lope Díaz
(Spain, 2018, 90 min.)

In this a hilarious screwball comedy that presents a fresh perspective on female empowerment, a devout Catholic woman, is about to be chosen leader of her local religious guild. But it all goes up in smoke when her biggest rival — an arrogant man — is chosen instead.

AFI Silver Theatre
Fri., June 1, 9:30 p.m.

 

Lots of Kids, a Monkey and a Castle
Directed by Gustavo Salmerón
(Spain, 2017, 90 min.)

Spanish actor Gustavo Salmerón steps behind the camera to capture the winsome eccentricities of his extraordinary mother Julita, who had three dreams: having lots of kids, owning a monkey and living in a castle.

AFI Silver Theatre
Sun., June 3, 4:45 p.m.

 

The Motive
Directed by Manuel Martín Cuenca
(Spain, 2017, 112 min.)

Álvaro dreams of being a writer — a true artist, and not a hack like his bestselling-author wife. When he catches her cheating on him right outside their home, Álvaro decides to leave and quit his boring job as a notary clerk so he can dedicate his life to the written word.

AFI Silver Theatre
Sun., June 3, 9:20 p.m.

 

Torremolinos 73
Directed by Pablo Berger
(Spain/Denmark, 2003, 91 min.)

Pablo Berger's hilarious debut feature is set in 1973 Spain — Francisco Franco is still in power, and Alfredo and his wife Carmen are struggling to make ends meet. When the couple agree to make their own Super 8 erotic "educational" films to be sold in Scandinavia, however, their fortunes change overnight.

AFI Silver Theatre
Sat., June 2, 10 p.m.

Last Edited on May 30, 2018