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Films - September 2018

Languages

English

Turkish


Japanese

 


Mandarin

 

Swedish

 

 

English

Bel Canto

Directed by Paul Weitz

(U.S., 2018, 102 min.)

A world-renowned opera singer becomes trapped in a hostage situation when she's invited to perform for a wealthy industrialist in South America.

Angelika Pop-Up

Opens Fri., Sept. 21

 

Blindspotting

Directed by Carlos López Estrada

(U.S., 2018, 95 min.)

Lifelong friends Daveed Diggs and Rafael Casal co-wrote and star in this timely and wildly entertaining story about the intersection of race and class, set against the backdrop of a rapidly gentrifying Oakland.

Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinema

Landmark's E Street Cinema

 

The Bookshop

Directed by Isabel Coixet

(U.K./Spain/Germany, 2018, 113 min.)

In 1959 England, free-spirited widow Florence Green (Emily Mortimer) risks everything to open a bookshop in a conservative East Anglian coastal town. While bringing about a surprising cultural awakening, she earns the polite but ruthless opposition of a local grand dame (Patricia Clarkson) and the support and affection of a reclusive book loving widower (Bill Nighy).

Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinema

 

Colette

Directed by Wash Westmoreland

(U.K./Hungary/U.S., 2019, 111 min.)

After marrying a successful Parisian writer Willy, Colette (Keira Knightley) is transplanted from her childhood home in rural France to the intellectual and artistic splendor of Paris. Soon after, Willy convinces Colette to ghostwrite for him. She pens a semi-autobiographical novel about a witty and brazen country girl named Claudine, sparking a bestseller and a cultural sensation. Colette's fight over creative ownership and gender roles drives her to overcome societal constraints, revolutionizing literature, fashion and sexual expression.

Angelika Mosaic

Opens Fri., Sept. 28

 

Crazy Rich Asians

Directed by Jon M. Chu

(U.S., 2018, 120 min.)

New Yorker Rachel accompanies her longtime boyfriend Nick to his best friend's wedding in Singapore. Excited about visiting Asia for the first time but nervous about meeting Nick's family, Rachel is unprepared to learn that Nick has neglected to mention a few key details about his life. It turns out that he is not only the scion of one of the country's wealthiest families but also one of its most sought-after bachelors (English, Mandarin and Cantonese).

Angelika Mosaic

Angelika Pop-Up

Atlantic Plumbing Cinema

 

Eighth Grade

Directed by Bo Burnham

(U.S., 2018, 93 min.)

A rare film that perfectly captures the awkwardness of adolescence, this poignant comedy focuses on 13-year-old Kayla as she endures the tidal wave of contemporary suburban adolescence and makes her way through the last week of middle school — the end of her thus far disastrous eighth grade year.

Angelika Mosaic

Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinema

Landmark's E Street Cinema

 

Full Metal Jacket

Directed by Stanley Kubrick

(U.S., 1987, 116 min.)

After the harrowing experience of boot camp, Matthew Modine and company exchange one hell for another when they see action in Vietnam.

AFI Silver Theatre

Sun., Sept. 9, 9 p.m.,

Mon., Sept. 10, 9:30 p.m.

 

John McEnroe: In the Realm of Perfection

Directed by Julien Faraut

(France, 2018, 95 min.)

"In the Realm of Perfection" revisits the rich bounty of 16-mm-shot footage of the left-handed tennis star John McEnroe, at the time the world's top-ranked player, as he competes in the French Open at Paris's Roland Garros Stadium in 1984.

West End Cinema

 

Juliet, Naked

Directed by Jesse Peretz

(U.S., 2018, 105 min.)

"Juliet, Naked" is the story of Annie (the long-suffering girlfriend of Duncan) and her unlikely transatlantic romance with once revered, now faded, singer-songwriter Tucker Crowe, who also happens to be the subject of Duncan's musical obsession.

AFI Silver Theatre

Angelika Mosaic

Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinema

Landmark's E Street Cinema

 

The Little Stranger

Directed by Lenny Abrahamson

(Ireland/U.K./France, 2018, 111 min.)

During the long hot summer of 1948, Dr. Faraday is called to a patient at Hundreds Hall, where his mother once worked. The Hall has been home to the Ayres family for more than two centuries, but it is now in decline and its inhabitants are haunted by something more ominous than a dying way of life. When he takes on his new patient, Faraday has no idea how closely, and how disturbingly, the family's story is about to become entwined with his own.

Angelika Mosaic

 

Love, Gilda

Directed by Lisa Dapolito

(Canada/U.S., 2018, 88 min.)

In her own words, comedian Gilda Radner reflects on her childhood, her comedy career, her relationships and, ultimately, her struggle with cancer.

Landmark's Theatres

Opens Fri., Sept. 21

 

Lizzie

Directed by Craig William Macneill

(U.S., 2018, 105 min.)

This psychological thriller is based on the infamous 1892 murders of the Borden family.

Angelika Mosaic

Opens Fri., Sept. 21

 

The Miseducation of Cameron Post

Directed by Desiree Akhavan

(U.S., 2018, 91 min.)

In 1993, a teenage girl is forced into a gay conversion therapy center by her conservative guardians.

Landmark's E Street Cinema

 

Nico, 1988

Directed by Susanna Nicciarelli

(Italy/Belgium, 2018, 93 min.)

Approaching 50, Nico leads a solitary, low-key existence in Manchester, far from her 1960s glam days as a Warhol superstar and celebrated vocalist for cult band The Velvet Underground. Her career seems over, but her new manager gives Nico some needed drive to hit the road again to tour Europe, although she continues to struggle with addiction and personal demons.

Landmark's E Street Cinema

 

Operation Finale

Directed by Chris Weitz

(U.S., 2018, 123 min.)

The thrilling true story "Operation Finale" follows the 1960 covert mission of legendary Mossad agent Peter Malkin as he infiltrates Argentina and captures Adolf Eichmann, the Nazi officer who masterminded the transportation logistics that brought millions of innocent Jews to their deaths in concentration camps (English and Spanish).

AFI Silver Theatre

Angelika Mosaic

Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinema

 

Papillon

Directed by Michael Noer

(Czech Republic/Spain/U.S., 2018, 133 min.)

Based on the international bestselling autobiographic books, this film follows the epic story of Henri "Papillon" Charrière, a safecracker from the Parisian underworld who is framed for murder and condemned to life in the notorious penal colony on Devil's Island.

Angelika Mosaic

Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinema

Landmark's E Street Cinema

 

Pick of the Litter

Directed by Don Hardy Jr. and Dana Nachman

(U.S., 2018, 81 min.)

Meet Patriot, Potomac, Primrose, Poppet and Phil — five spirited, adorable Labrador retriever puppies who, from the moment they're born, begin an incredible journey to become guide dogs for the blind. It's a rigorous two-year process that will take the pups from the care of selfless foster volunteers to specialized trainers and finally, if they make the cut, to a lifelong human companion.

Landmark's Theatres

Opens Fri., Sept. 14

 

RBG

Directed by Julie Cohen and Betsy West

(U.S., 2018, 97 min.)

At the age of 84, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has developed a breathtaking legal legacy while becoming an unexpected pop culture icon. But without a definitive Ginsburg biography, the unique personal journey of this diminutive, quiet warrior's rise to the nation's highest court has been largely unknown, even to some of her biggest fans—until now.

Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinema

 

Three Identical Strangers

Directed by Tim Wardle

(U.K., 2018, 96 min.)

New York, 1980: Three complete strangers accidentally discover that they are identical triplets, separated at birth. The 19-year-olds' joyous reunion catapults them to international fame, but it also unlocks an extraordinary and disturbing secret that goes beyond their own lives - and could transform our understanding of human nature forever.

Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinema

West End Cinema

 

Unarmed Verses

Directed by Charles Officer

(Canada, 2017, 86 min.)

"Unarmed Verses" follows the precociously talented Francine, a 12-year-old girl who is, along with her family and community, facing eviction from their low-income housing block in Toronto. Armed with a luminous, undaunted creative spirit and a restless, generous intelligence, Francine turns to artistic expression as she and her friends prepare to record music and poetry together.

AFI Silver Theatre

Mon., Sept. 3, 7:30 p.m.

 

We the Animals

Directed by Jeremiah Zagar

(U.S., 2018, 94 min.)

While brothers Manny and Joel grow into versions of their loving and unpredictable Paps, young Jonah is sheltered by his mother in the cocoon of their home. More sensitive and conscious than his older siblings, trying to navigate his way around his macho father and brothers while discovering his artistic and sexual leanings, Jonah increasingly embraces an imagined world all his own.

Angelika Mosaic

Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinema

Landmark's E Street Cinema

 

The Wife

Directed by Björn Runge

(Sweden/U.S./U.K., 2018, 100 min.)

After nearly 40 years of marriage, Joan and Joe Castleman (Glenn Close and Jonathan Pryce) are complements. Where Joe is vain, Joan is self-effacing. And where Joe enjoys his very public role as Great American Novelist, Joan pours her considerable intellect, grace, charm and diplomacy into the private role of Great Man's Wife. As Joe is about to be awarded the Nobel Prize, this film interweaves the story of the couple's youthful passion and ambition with a portrait of a marriage, 30-plus years later, filled with shared compromises, secrets, betrayals and mutual love.

Angelika Mosaic

Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinema

Landmark's E Street Cinema

 

Won't You Be My Neighbor?

Directed by Morgan Neville

(U.S., 2018, 94 min.)

For over 30 years, Fred Rogers, an unassuming minister, puppeteer, writer and producer, was beamed daily into homes across America. In his beloved television program, "Mister Rogers' Neighborhood," Fred and his cast of puppets and friends spoke directly to young children about some of life's weightiest issues, in a simple, direct fashion.

Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinema

West End Cinema

 

Japanese

An Autumn Afternoon

Directed by Yasujiro Ozu

(Japan, 1962, 113 min.)

The last film by Yasujiro Ozu was also his final masterpiece, a gently heartbreaking story about a man's dignified resignation to life's shifting currents and society's modernization. Though the widower Shuhei has been living comfortably for years with his grown daughter, a series of events leads him to accept and encourage her marriage and departure from their home.

Freer Gallery of Art

Wed., Sept. 5, 2 p.m.

 

The Third Murder
(Sandome no satsujin)

Directed by Hirokazu Koreeda

(Japan, 2018, 124 min.)

Leading attorney Shigemori takes on the defense of murder-robbery suspect Misumi, who served jail time for another murder 30 years ago. Shigemori's chances of winning the case seem low—his client freely admits his guilt, despite facing the death penalty if he is convicted. But as he digs deeper into the case, the once-confident Shigemori begins to doubt whether his client is the murderer after all.

West End Cinema

 

Mandarin

The Great Buddha+

Directed by Huang Hsin-yao

(Taiwan, 2017, 104 min.)

Mixing class-consciousness with dirty jokes, this film tells the story of Pickle and Belly Button, two amiable working-class stiffs who make a shocking discovery while going through the dash-cam footage of Pickle's wealthy playboy boss (Mandarin, Taiwanese dialect and English).

Freer Gallery of Art

Fri., Sept. 21, 7 p.m.

 

Legend of the Mountain

Directed by King Hu

(Taiwan/Hong Kong, 1979, 184 min.)

A traveling scholar, intent on translating a Buddhist sutra, loses his way in the mountains. Time and space collapse around him as he continues his journey, encountering ghostly visitations amid a haunting fantasia of color, light and landscape.

Freer Gallery of Art

Sun., Sept. 23, 2 p.m.

 

Love Education

Directed by Sylvia Chang

(China/Taiwan, 2017, 120 min.)

Legendary Taiwanese actress and director Sylvia Chang plays a dying woman in her latest film effort. Memories of her father inspire the woman to move his grave from his home village to the family's current city. But his feisty first wife refuses, touching off a family scuffle that becomes a social media sensation.

Freer Gallery of Art

Fri., Sept. 28, 7 p.m.

 

On Happiness Road

Directed by Sung Hsin-yin

(Taiwan, 2017, 111 min.)

The Freer|Sackler teams up with the Global Taiwan Institute for an evening of Taiwanese snacks, the delightful animated feature "On Happiness Road" and director Sung Hsin-yin as a special guest. An "ambitious, affecting mix of history and nostalgia that avoids cheap sentimentality" (Hollywood Reporter), Sung's semi-autobiographical film covers decades of Taiwanese history through the eyes of an expatriate. Her return home following her grandmother's death prompts bittersweet nostalgia and self-reflection.

Freer Gallery of Art

Tue., Sept. 25, 7 p.m.

 

Traces of the Brush: The Heartprint of Fu Shen

Directed by Eros Zhao

(U.S./Taiwan, 2018, 65 min.)

A Taiwanese scholar, collector, artist, and educator, Fu Shen is one of the most distinguished traditional connoisseurs of Chinese painting — and one of the last practitioners of this demanding discipline. Directed by his final pupil, this documentary explores Fu's extraordinary career, including his time as a curator here at the Freer|Sackler from 1979 to 1994.

Freer Gallery of Art

Sun., Sept. 30, 2 p.m.

 

Swedish

After the Rehearsal

Directed by Ingmar Bergman

(Sweden/West Germany, 1984, 70 min.)

Taking place within the confines of a single stage set and merging theater, memory and autobiography, this intimate film focuses on a veteran theater director preparing for his fifth production of August Strindberg's "A Dream Play." When he encounters both his ambitious young lead and the washed-up star of a former production, the encounters and connections between the three characters form a poignant meditation on life, theater and the process of connecting the two.

AFI Silver Theatre

Mon., Sept. 3, 5:45 p.m.

 

Fanny and Alexander Part One and Two

Directed by Ingmar Bergman

(Sweden/France/West Germany, 1983, 175 min./150 min.)

In the tour-de-force opening, brother and sister Fanny and Alexander celebrate a splendorous Christmas in 1907 Sweden. However, their fate takes a turn for the worse when their theater-manager father dies and their mother remarries a stern bishop. Escape from his household leads them, by an indirect path, into the life of an old Jewish antique dealer whose life still has room for the mysticism and magic of an earlier time (Swedish, English, German and Yiddish).

AFI Silver Theatre

Sat., Sept. 1, 1:05 p.m. (Part One)

Sun., Sept. 2, 1:05 p.m. (Part Two)

 

Saraband

Directed by Ingmar Bergman

(Sweden/Denmark/Norway/Italy/Finland/Germany/Austria, 2003, 107 min.)

Ingmar Bergman's final film is a sequel to 1973's "Scenes from a Marriage," which returns to the characters of Marianne (Liv Ullmann) and Johan (Erland Josephson) as they meet once more after 30 years without contact. The family is still mourning Anna, Henrik's much-loved wife, who died two years earlier, yet who, in many ways, remains present among them. Marianne soon realizes that things are not all as they should be, and she finds herself unwillingly drawn into a complicated and upsetting power struggle (Swedish, English and German).

AFI Silver Theatre

Mon., Sept. 10, 7:15 p.m.

Turkish

Ayla: The Daughter of War

Directed by Sıtkı Can Ulkay

(Turkey/South Korea, 2017, 125 min.)

In 1950, amid the ravages of the Korean War, Sergeant Süleyman stumbles upon a half-frozen little girl with no parents and no help in sight. Frantic and on the verge of death, the girl captures Süleyman's heart. He risks his own life to save her, smuggling her into his army base and out of harm's way (Turkish, Korean and English).

Freer Gallery of Art

Sun., Sept. 16, 6 p.m.

 

Big Big World

Directed by Reha Erdem

(Turkey, 2016, 101 min.)

Teenagers Ali and Zuhal grew up in an orphanage and share a bond as strong as that between brother and sister. When Ali moves out on account of his age, Zuhal is put into the dubious care of a foster family and kept away from Ali. In a desperate attempt to save Zuhal from an arranged marriage, Ali commits a terrible crime, and they find themselves on the run, away from civilization and into the woods.

Freer Gallery of Art

Fri., Sept. 14, 4 p.m.

 

Butterflies

Directed by Tolga Karaçelik

(Turkey, 2018, 112 min.)

Siblings Cemal, Kenan and Suzi have grown apart since leaving the tiny village where they grew up, and going their separate ways. But when their estranged father demands that they return home immediately, Cemal, the eldest, is tasked with convincing his brother and sister to journey back to places they have been striving to forget.

Freer Gallery of Art

Fri., Sept. 14, 7 p.m.

 

Grain

Directed by Semih Kaplanoğlu

(Turkey/Germany/France/Sweden/Qatar, 2017, 128 min.)

Climate change has caused the near-extinction of human life in this spellbinding dystopian sci-fi film. Genetically engineered seeds, which have all but wiped out real grain, are mysteriously failing to work. While the establishment struggles to find answers, scientist Erol searches for a famed geneticist who disappeared some years ago after predicting this doomsday scenario.

Freer Gallery of Art

Fri., Sept. 14, 1 p.m.

 

Sideway

Directed by Tayfun Pirselimoğlu

(Turkey, 2017, 119 min.)

The residents of a small town set between a stormy sea and an ominous forest are going insane. A black ship anchored far away, a shrill sound, strange cases of arson, missing people and the sun suddenly turning black lead the townsfolk to believe that the Antichrist is around. A young, modest guy with a mysterious mark on his back arrives in this bizarre place. Could he be Christ arriving to save the town?

Freer Gallery of Art

Thu., Sept. 13, 7 p.m.

 

The Wild Pear Tree

Directed by Nuri Bilge Ceylan

(Turkey/France/Germany/Bulgaria/Macedonia/Bosnia-Herzegovina/Sweden, 2018, 188 min.)

An aspiring writer returns to his hometown to try to further his career, only to be forced into a reckoning with his father's shadowy past in this film suffused with the philosophical, visual, and narrative richness that characterize Nuri Bilge Ceylan's films (director in attendance).

Freer Gallery of Art

Sun., Sept. 16, 1 p.m.