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Films - May 2019

 

Languages

Czech

Hebrew

Mandarin


English

Italian

Polish


French

Japanese

Spanish

German

Korean

Yiddish

Czech

Toman

Directed by Ondref Trojan
(Czech Republic, 2018, 144 min.)

This fascinating historical drama revolves around the real-life figure of Zdeněk Toman, a controversial and singular character in modern Czech politics. He was an unscrupulous careerist and an unsavory politician, blackmailing, exploiting, and intimidating his way to the top of the communist food chain. But he has another unlikely other role in the history books — as a savior of Jews (part of the Washington Jewish Film Festival).

AFI Silver Theatre
Sun., May 19, 7:15 p.m.

Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinema
Tue., May 21, 7:50 p.m.

 

English

Abe

Directed by Fernando Grostein Andrade
(Brazil, 2019, 85 min.)

In this delectable charmer fresh from Sundance, 12-year-old Brooklynite Abe navigates the complicated identity issues that arise from having a Jewish-Israeli mother and a Muslim-Palestinian father (English, Arabic and Portuguese; part of the Washington Jewish Film Festival).

Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinema
Sat., May 18, 1:45 p.m.

AFI Silver Theatre
Sun., May 26, 3 p.m.

All Is True

Directed by Kenneth Branagh
(U.K., 2019, 101 min.)

An all-star casts looks at the final days in the life of renowned playwright William Shakespeare.

AFI Silver Theatre
Angelika Mosaic
Opens Fri., May 17

Be Natural: The Untold Story of Alice Guy-Blaché

Directed by Pamela B. Green
(U.S., 2018, 103 min.)

Alice Guy-Blaché was a true pioneer who got into the movie business at the very beginning, in 1894, at the age of 21. Two years later, she was made head of production at Gaumont and started directing films. She and her husband moved to the United States and she founded her own company, Solax, in 1910. But by 1919, Guy-Blaché's career came to an abrupt end, and she and the 1,000 films that bore her name were largely forgotten.

AFI Silver Theatre
Opens Fri., May 10

The Chaperone

Directed by Michael Engler
(Australia/U.K./U.S., 2019, 103 min.)

A slice of pre-Hollywood history comes to light in this coming-of-age story centering on the relationship between the young, free-spirited and soon-to-be international screen starlet Louise Brooks and her tee-totalling chaperone. On their journey from the conservative confines of Wichita, Kansas, to the flash and sizzle of New York City, both women are driven by a kindred desire for self-discovery and liberation from the past.

West End Cinema

Family

Directed by Laura Steinel
(U.S., 2019, 85 min.)

Kate Stone, a career-focused, self-absorbed workaholic. She's not good with kids. She's not good in most social situations. When her estranged brother tracks her down to watch her awkward and bullied 12-year-old niece Maddie, Kate thinks babysitting for the week can't get any worse — until Maddie tries to run away from home.

Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinema

Flower Drum Song

Directed by Henry Coster
(U.S., 1961, 132 min.)

Based on a novel by Chinese American author Chin Yang Lee, this Rodgers and Hammerstein musical is a lighthearted look at young Chinese Americans and their tradition-bound parents in San Francisco's Chinatown.

Freer Gallery of Art
Mon., May 6, 1 p.m.

From Cairo to the Cloud: The World of the Cairo Geniza

Directed by Michelle Paymar
(Canada/Egypt/France/Israel/U.S., 2018, 92 min.)

In 1896, Solomon Schechter entered the sacred storeroom of an ancient synagogue in Cairo and discovered a vast treasure trove of manuscripts that revolutionized our understanding of Jewish history and illuminated 1,000 years of vibrant Jewish life in the heart of the Islamic world (part of the Washington Jewish Film Festival).

Landmark's E Street Cinema
Sat., May 11, 8:30 p.m.

AFI Silver Theatre
Sun., May 11, 8 p.m.

Gloria Bell

Directed by Sebastián Lelio
(Chile/U.S., 2019, 102 min.)

Gloria (Julianne Moore) is a free-spirited divorcée who spends her days at a straight-laced office job and her nights on the dance floor, joyfully letting loose at clubs around Los Angeles.

Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinema
Landmark's E Street Cinema
West End Cinema

Hail Satan?

Directed by Penny Lane
(U.S., 2019, 95 min.)

When media-savvy members of the Satanic Temple organize a series of public actions designed to advocate for religious freedom and challenge corrupt authority, they prove that with little more than a clever idea, a mischievous sense of humor, and a few rebellious friends, you can speak truth to power in some truly profound ways.

AFI Silver Theatre
West End Cinema

Hotel Mumbai

Directed by Anthony Maras
(Australia/U.S., 2019, 125 min.)

Based on the true story of the 2008 terrorist attack on the famed Taj Hotel in Mumbai, hotel staff risk their lives to keep everyone safe as people make unthinkable sacrifices to protect themselves and their families (multiple languages).

Landmark's E Street Cinema
Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinema

High Life

Directed by Claire Denis
(Germany/France/U.K./Poland/U.S., 2018, 110 min.)

A father and his daughter struggle to survive in deep space where a group of criminals have become the subjects of a human reproduction experiment.

AFI Silver Theatre
Landmark's E Street Cinema

Junun

Directed by Paul Thomas Anderson
(U.S., 2015, 54 min.)

Filmed in India's spectacular 15th-century Mehrangarh Fort, this rare documentary captures Radiohead guitarist Jonny Greenwood's collaboration with Israeli singer Shye Ben Tzur and Indian ensemble Rajasthan Express (English, Hebrew, Hindi and Urdu).

Freer Gallery of Art
Mon., May 20, 1 p.m.

King Bibi

Directed by Dan Shadur
(Israel/U.S., 2018, 87 min.)

This documentary explores Benjamin Netanyahu's rise to power using archival footage of his media performances over the years: from his days as a popular guest expert on American TV, through his public confession of adultery, and his mastery of social media (part of the Washington Jewish Film Festival).

AFI Silver Theatre
Mon., May 13, 7:30 p.m.

Landmark's E Street Cinema
Tue., May 14, 6:15 p.m.

Knock Down the House

Directed by Rachel Lears
(U.S., 2019, 86 min.)

Four exceptional women mount grassroots campaigns against powerful incumbents in "Knock Down the House," an inspiring look at the 2018 midterm elections that tipped the balance of power.

Landmark's E Street Cinema
Opens Fri., May 1

Little Woods

Directed by Nia DaCosta
(U.S., 2019, 105 min.)

In a North Dakota fracking boomtown well beyond its prime, Ollie is trying to survive the last few days of her probation after serving jail time for smuggling prescription pills over the Canadian border. But when her mother dies, she is thrust back into the life of her estranged sister Deb, who is facing her own crisis with an unplanned pregnancy and a deadbeat ex.

Landmark's E Street Cinema

Lost & Found

Directed by Liam O'Mochain
(Ireland, 2019, 96 min.)

Come celebrate the resilient spirit of Ireland, with this delightful dramatic comedy of seven interconnecting stories set in and around the lost & found office of a train station in a small Irish town, where everyone knows everyone else's business.

West End Cinema
Opens Fri., May 3

Marianne & Leonard: Words of Love

Directed by Nick Broomfield
(U.S., 2019, 97 min.)

Renowned filmmaker Nick Broomfield's most personal and romantic film to date captures the beautiful, yet tragic, love story between Leonard Cohen and his Norwegian muse, Marianne Ihlen (English and Norwegian; part of the Washington Jewish Film Festival).

AFI Silver Theatre
Thu., May 16, 7:15 p.m.

Meeting Gorbachev

Directed by Werner Herzog and Andre Singer
(U.K./U.S./Germany, 2019, 90 min.)

This riveting documentary chronicles the life of Mikhail Gorbachev, the visionary last leader of the Soviet Union, who tried to make the world a safer place (English, Russian, German and Polish).

Landmark's Theatres
Opens Fri., May 24

The Mustang

Directed by Laure de Clermont-Tonnerre
(France/U.S., 2019, 96 min.)

Roman Coleman, a violent convict, is given the chance to participate in a rehabilitation therapy program involving the training of wild mustangs.

Landmark's E Street Cinema

Paris Song

Directed by Jeff Vespa
(Kazakhstan/Latvia/U.S., 2018, 90 min.)

A small-town vocalist travels from Soviet-ruled Kazakhstan to the 1925 Paris Expo to compete in an international singing competition, where he develops an unlikely friendship with Jewish-American songwriter George Gershwin and photographer Lee Abbott (English, Hebrew, French and Arabic; part of the Washington Jewish Film Festival).

Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinema
Sat., May 18, 3:45 p.m.

AFI Silver Theatre
Sat., May 25, 1:45 p.m.

The Passengers

Directed by Ryan Porush
(Ethiopia/Israel/U.S., 2019, 70 min.)

"The Passengers" tells the story of the Ethiopian Jews and the struggle for a final, abandoned community to immigrate to Israel. The film follows the unlikely journey of two young men on a fateful trip to America as representatives of a grassroots advocacy campaign (English, Hebrew and Amharic; part of the Washington Jewish Film Festival).

Landmark's E Street Cinema
Sat., May 11, 6:15 p.m.

AFI Silver Theatre
Tue., May 14, 6:30 p.m.

Red Joan

Directed by Trevor Nunn
(U.K., 2018, 101 min.)

Joan Stanley (Judi Dench) is a widow living out a quiet retirement in the suburbs when, shockingly, the British Secret Service places her under arrest. The charge: providing classified scientific information — including details on the building of the atomic bomb — to the Soviet government for decades. As she is interrogated, Joan relives the dramatic events that shaped her life and beliefs: her student days at Cambridge, where she excelled at physics while challenging deep-seated sexism; her tumultuous love affair with a dashing political radical; and the devastation of World War II.

Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinema

Sefarad

Directed by Luis Ismael
(Portugal, 2018, 100 min.)

A sweeping epic that covers Jewish history in Portugal from the times of the Crypto Jews in 1496, through to the Nazi regime to modern times, "Sefarad" centers on the life of army captain Arturo de Barros Basto, founder of the Oporto Jewish Community (English, Hebrew, Yiddish and Portuguese; part of the Washington Jewish Film Festival).

AFI Silver Theatre
Sun., May 12, 5:45 p.m.

Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinema
Mon., May 20, 8:15 p.m.

Song of Lahore

Directed by Sharmeen Obaid-Chinoy and Andy Schocke
(U.S., 2015, 82 min.)

"Song of Lahore" follows Sachal Studios musicians from their hometown in Pakistan to New York City (English, Urdu and Punjabi).

Freer Gallery of Art
Mon., May 13, 1 p.m.

The Souvenir

Directed by Joanna Hogg
(U.K./U.S., 2019, 119 min.)

A young film student in the early 80s becomes romantically involved with a complicated and untrustworthy man.

Angelika Mosaic
Opens Fri., May 24

Sustainable Nation

Directed by Micah Smith
(Israel, 2019, 70 min.)

"Sustainable Nation" follows three extraordinary individuals doing their part to bring sustainable water access to an increasingly thirsty planet using solutions developed in water-poor Israel (part of the Washington Jewish Film Festival).

Landmark's E Street Cinema
Sat., May 11, 3:45 p.m.

AFI Silver Theatre
Wed., May 22, 6:30 p.m.

Teen Spirit

Directed by Max Minghella
(U.K./U.S., 2018, 93 min.)

Violet is a shy teenager who dreams of escaping her small town and pursuing her passion to sing. With the help of an unlikely mentor, she enters a local singing competition that will test her integrity, talent and ambition. Driven by a pop-fueled soundtrack, Teen Spirit is a visceral and stylish spin on the Cinderella story.

Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinema
Landmark's E Street Cinema

Tolkien

Directed by Dome Karukoski
(U.S., 2019, 112 min.)

"Tolkien" explores the formative years of the orphaned author as he finds friendship, love and artistic inspiration among a group of fellow outcasts at school.

Angelika Mosaic
Opens Fri., May 10

Walking on Water

Directed by Andrey Paounov
(Italy/U.S./Germany/UAE, 2019, 105 min.)

Seven years after the passing of his wife and creative partner, Jeanne-Claude, renowned environmental artist Christo sets out to realize The Floating Piers, a project they conceived together many years before. We follow his visionary quest to install a wide golden walkway floating across the scenic Italian alpine Lake Iseo, looking like a heavenly dream but sturdy enough to support hundreds of thousands of people.

Landmark's Theatres
Opens Fri., May 31

The White Crow

Directed by Ralph Fiennes
(U.K./France, 2019, 127 min.)

This is the story of the defection of Rudolf Nureyev, a top Soviet ballet and contemporary dancer and choreographer, to the West (English, Russian and French).

Angelika Mosaic
Opens Fri., May 3

 

French

My Polish Honeymoon

Directed by Elise Otzenberger
(France, 2019, 88 min.)

Fresh off their wedding ceremony, a Jewish couple from Paris travels to Poland for a memorial service. The eye-opening trip awkwardly doubles as their honeymoon in this delightful romantic comedy (part of the Washington Jewish Film Festival).

AFI Silver Theatre
Sat., May 11, 8:45 p.m.

Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinema
Sun., May 19, 3:30 p.m.

 

German

Anna's War

Directed by Aleksey Fedorchenko
(Russia, 2018, 75 min.)

Ukraine, 1941: A Jewish girl regains consciousness under a thick layer of black earth. Close-ups of milky-white body parts surrounding her reveal she is in a mass grave. The image is startling and haunting, but it's Anna's resolve to persevere that's truly indelible (German, Russian and Ukrainian; part of the Washington Jewish Film Festival).

Landmark's E Street Cinema
Sat., May 11, 4 p.m.

Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinema
Wed,. May 22, 8:30 p.m.

A Fortunate Man

Directed by Bille August
(Denmark, 2018, 168 min.)

A gifted but self-destructive young man leaves his suffocating Lutheran upbringing in the country for the metropolitan Copenhagen of the 1880s. An engineer with progressive ideas, he is welcomed by a wealthy Jewish family and assimilates himself into their opulent milieu, embarking on a journey of personal and professional ambition that teeters on the razor's edge between triumph and catastrophe (German and Danish; part of the Washington Jewish Film Festival).

AFI Silver Theatre
Thu., May 9, 7:30 p.m.

Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinema
Thu., May 16, 8 p.m.

The Mover

Directed by Davis Simanis
(Latvia, 2018, 87 min.)

This beautifully rendered testament to the heroism of blue-collar family turned righteous saviors looks at Žanis and Johanna Lipke, who would become Latvia's Schindlers (German, Yiddish and Latvian; part of the Washington Jewish Film Festival).

Landmark's E Street Cinema
Thu., May 9, 6:15 p.m.

Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinema
Sun., May 19, 3:15 p.m.

Hebrew

Autonomies

Directed by Yehonatan Indursky
(Israel, 2018, 210 min.)

Broide is a smuggler in Israel who makes his living sneaking minor contraband between the two secular and ultra-orthodox regions of Jerusalem. One day, he receives a life-changing proposal to kidnap a little girl at the heart of a custody battle between two families that live in the opposite regions (part of the Washington Jewish Film Festival).

AFI Silver Theatre
Sun., May 12, 1:30 p.m.

Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinema
Thu., May 16, 6:30 p.m.

Back to Maracana

Directed by Jorge Gurvich
(Brazil/Germany/Israel, 2018, 90 min.)

Middle-aged divorcee Roberto and his septuagenarian father—Brazilian expats living in Israel—are soccer fanatics, boiling over with excitement for the upcoming World Cup in Brazil. That is, until Roberto's ex-wife informs him that she's off on a business trip (to Rio, no less!), saddling him with sole care of their spoiled teenage son (part of the Washington Jewish Film Festival).

Landmark's E Street Cinema
Thu., May 9, 8:15 p.m.

Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinema
Sun., May 19, 7:20 p.m.

The Dive

Directed by Yona Rozenkeir
(Israel, 2018, 91 min.)

After learning of his father's death, prodigal son Yoav returns to the sparsely populated kibbutz where he was raised alongside his brothers Itai and Avishai, who is about to ship off for military service in Lebanon (part of the Washington Jewish Film Festival).

Landmark's E Street Cinema
Sat., May 11, 7:45 p.m.

AFI Silver Theatre
Sat., May 18, 8:30 p.m.

Family in Transition

Directed by Ofir Trainin
(Israel, 2018, 70 min.)

In this deeply affecting paean to the true meaning of family, love and parenthood, Amit is a father raising four children in the traditional Israeli town of Nahariya. When he confides to his wife Galit that he is a transgender woman planning to transition, she's remarkably supportive. But as Amit's transformation takes shape, this harmony begins fraying at the edges, and not in ways that were entirely expected (part of the Washington Jewish Film Festival).

Landmark's E Street Cinema
Wed., May 15, 8:45 p.m.

Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinema
Mon., May 20, 6:30 p.m.

Redemption

Directed by Joseph Madmony and Boaz Yehonatan Yacov
(Israel, 2018, 104 min.)

Menachem is a middle-age single father struggling to finance his 6-year-old daughter's medical treatment with his meager income as a grocery clerk. He had fronted a rock 'n' roll band until the adoption of a devoted Hasidic practice that set him apart from his old friends. Playing music promises to be more lucrative than stocking shelves, but would a return to singing be compatible with a life of worship? (Opening night of the Washington Jewish Film Festival.)

AFI Silver Theatre
Wed., May 8, 6:45 p.m.

Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinema
Tue., May 21, 8:15 p.m.

Shooting Life

Directed by David Kreiner
(Israel, 2018, 87 min.)

Igal Gazit, an unemployed film director from Tel Aviv, moves to Sderot and takes up a teaching job at the local high school. His first meeting with the students doesn't go well: they make fun of the 'enlightenment' he brings from Tel Aviv. But the road to fulfilling that promise is one that the students will never forget (part of the Washington Jewish Film Festival).

Landmark's E Street Cinema
Sun., May 12, 8:45 p.m.

Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinema
Wed., May 22, 6:30 p.m.

Working Woman
(Isha Ovedet)

Directed by Michal Aviad
(Israel, 2019, 93 min.)

Orna is the attractive mother of three young children, with a husband struggling to start his own restaurant. To help support her family, Orna returns to the workplace, landing a plum job with a former army superior. She is ambitious and good at her job, soon earning promotion and bonuses. Working closely with her boss, she begins to experience escalating sexual harassment from him, a pattern of predatory behavior which ultimately brings her career and marital relationship to the brink.

Landmark's Theatres
Opens Fri., May 17

 

Italian

Dogman

Directed by Matteo Garrone
(Italy/France, 2019, 103 min.)

Marcello is a small and gentle dog groomer in a rundown seaside resort town who wants two things: to look after his dogs and take his daughter on exotic holidays. But to fund this lifestyle he gets into a side business that has a more unsavory clientele, and he soon finds himself being coerced into the petty criminal schemes of the local bully Simoncino, a huge, violent ex-boxer who terrorizes the neighborhood.

Landmark's Theatres
Opens Fri., May 10

 

Japanese

Rashômon

Directed by Akira Kurosawa
(Japan, 1950, 88 min.)

The murder of a man and the rape of his wife in a forest grove are seen from several different perspectives. Akira Kurosawa's meditation on the nature of truth transformed narrative cinema as we know it, and birthed the term "Rashômon effect."

AFI Silver Theatre
Thu., May 2, 5:15 p.m.

 

Korean

Burning

Directed by Lee Chang-dong
(South Korea, 2018, 148 min.)

In the most acclaimed Korean film to hit American shores in years, Lee Chang-dong brilliantly blends two love tales into a riveting cinematic experience that continues to haunt the viewer long after the lights come up.

Freer Gallery of Art
Sat., May 18, 2 p.m.

Grass

Directed by Hong Sang-soo
(South Korea, 2018, 66 min.)

In a pleasant Seoul café, a woman sits alone pecking at her laptop and eavesdropping on other customers, whose conversations range from relationship troubles to artistic ambitions, but soon we become aware that nothing is as straightforward as it appears.

Freer Gallery of Art
Sun., May 12, 1:30 p.m.

Hit by the Night

Directed by Jeong Ga-young
(South Korea, 2017, 85 min.)

Playing an independent filmmaker much like herself, Jeong Ga-young invites a handsome young actor out for drinks under the pretense of interviewing him for her latest project. But her real goal is to get him into bed. As the liquor flows and her questions range from provocative to explicit, the results are flustering (for him), hilarious (for the audience), and, in their frank treatment of female desire, utterly unique in Korean cinema.

Freer Gallery of Art
Fri., May 31, 7 p.m.

Hotel by the River

Directed by Hong Sang-soo
(South Korea, 2018, 96 min.)

The latest feature from award-winning auteur Hong Sang-soo follows two interconnected storylines set in and around a quiet hotel in winter. In one, an aging poet is visited by his estranged adult sons. In the other, a young woman with an unexplained hand wound holes up with a friend to recover from a bad breakup.

Freer Gallery of Art
Sun., May 12, 3:30 p.m.

Little Forest

Directed by Yim Soon-rye
(South Korea, 2018, 103 min.)

The latest film from pioneering female director Yim Soon-rye is the heartwarming story of a young woman who abandons city life for her remote childhood home. There, she rediscovers the simple pleasures of growing and cooking her own food while reconnecting with childhood friends and her troubled single mother.

Freer Gallery of Art
Fri., May 10, 7 p.m.

 

Mandarin

The Story of Yanxi Palace

Multiple directors
(China, 2018, 90 min.)

Set in the Qing dynasty during the Qianlong emperor's reign and full of gorgeous costumes and sets, this show reveals the world of the 18th-century Chinese court, complete with love, betrayal and palace intrigue.

Freer Gallery of Art
Sat., May 11, 3:30 p.m.

Long Day's Journey Into Night

Directed by Bi Gan
(China/France, 2018, 130 min.)

In this noir-tinged stunner that has become China's biggest art house hit of all time, a lost soul on a quest to find a missing woman from his past. Following leads across Guizhou province, he crosses paths with a series of colorful characters, among them a prickly hairdresser played by Taiwanese superstar Sylvia Chang. When the search leads him to a dingy movie theater, the film launches into an hour-long, single-take, gravity-defying climactic sequence that plunges its protagonist into a labyrinthine cityscape.

Landmark's E Street Cinema
Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinema
Opens Fri., May 3

 

Polish

The Dancing Dogs of Dombrova

Directed by Zack Bernbaum
(Canada, 2018, 102 min.)

On a cold winter night, estranged siblings Sarah and Aaron Cotler arrive at an empty train station in Dombrova, Poland. With their only available ride being a determinedly silent driver, they embark on a quest to fulfill their dying grandmother's wish — to find, dig up and bring home the bones of her favorite childhood dog, Peter (Polish and English; part of the Washington Jewish Film Festival).

AFI Silver Theatre
Sun., May 19, 7:30 p.m.

Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinema
Thu., May 23, 8:30 p.m.

Dolce Fine Giornata

Directed by Jaceck Borcuch
(Poland, 2018, 90 min.)

After a terrorist attack in Rome, Maria refuses to succumb to the hysterical fear and anti-immigrant sentiment that quickly emerges, deciding in her acceptance speech of a local honor to boldly decry Europe's eroding democracy — but she is unprepared for the backlash (Polish, Italian and French; part of the Washington Jewish Film Festival.

AFI Silver Theatre
Sat., May 11, 3:40 p.m.

Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinema
Sun., May 19, 5:15 p.m.

 

Spanish

Everybody Knows

Directed by Asghar Farhadi
(Spain/France/Italy, 2019, 132 min.)

Laura, a Spanish woman living in Buenos Aires, returns to her hometown outside Madrid with her two children to attend her sister's wedding. However, the trip is upset by unexpected events that bring secrets into the open (Spanish, English and Catalan).

Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinema

Leona

Directed by Isaac Cherem
(Mexico, 2018, 95 min.)

A young Jewish woman from Mexico City finds herself torn between her conservative family and forbidden love with a non-Jewish man (part of the Washington Jewish Film Festival).

Landmark's E Street Cinema

Tue., May 14, 8:30 p.m.

AFI Silver Theatre
Wed., May 15, 8 p.m.

 

Yiddish

Brussels Transit

Directed by Samy Szlingerbaum
(Belgium, 1980, 80 min.)

In 1980, visionary director Samy Szlingerbaum mined the childhood memories of his parents' immigration to the "promised land" of Belgium to produce the first feature-length Yiddish film in 30 years (part of the Washington Jewish Film Festival).

Landmark's E Street Cinema
Tue., May 14, 8:30 p.m.

AFI Silver Theatre
Sun., May 19, 12:30 p.m.

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