Events - July 2013

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EVENT CATEGORIES

Art

Dance

Festivals

Theater

 

 


ART

Opens Wed., July 3
Seven Points (Part Two)
"Seven Points" is a series of exhibitions that showcase the work of seven Australian contemporary artists: Daniel Boyd, Marley Dawson, Newell Harry, Anna Kristensen, Angelica Mesiti, Kate Mitchell and Tim Silver. Informed by periods of residency internationally, these artists' works offer alternative points of entry into the diverse conditions of Australian culture.
Embassy of Australia

July 3 to Aug. 9
The Burning of Visibility: From Reality to Dream
Renowned French photographer Anne-Lise Large has resided in the United States for the past four years, lending a unique perspective to her latest photographic series, which offers an outsider's view of what constitutes "American culture."
Art Museum of the Americas
F Street Gallery

July 3 to Oct. 6
NOW at the Corcoran – Ellen Harvey: The Alien's Guide to the Ruins of Washington, D.C.
Ellen Harvey's new project is a glimpse into the world of the distant future. Human civilization having long since come to an end, the earth is populated now only by ruins, ripe for archeological interpretation by visitors from another planet. Attempting to make sense of what they find, Harvey's aliens immediately mine the potential of one of the greatest neo-classical cities — Washington, D.C. — as a tourist destination.
Corcoran Gallery of Art

Through July 5
Eliana Macri: Paintings
Buenos Aires native Eliana Macri creates abstract paintings and engravings whose vibrant colors, lines and space form shapes that appear to be moving around the canvas, trying to escape, seeking something more, multiplying and growing.
Embassy of Argentina

Through July 7
One Man's Search for Ancient China: The Paul Singer Collection
New Jersey psychiatrist-turned-collector Paul Singer's bequest to the Sackler Gallery created one of the largest Chinese archaeological collections in the United States. This exhibition looks at the collector's contributions to Chinese art history — made largely at a time when contact between China and the West was heavily restricted — and examines how landmark archaeological discoveries have shed new light on his acquisitions and on ancient China.
Arthur M. Sackler Gallery

Through July 12
Nothing is Done (Nichts ist erledigt)
Ever since the 1970s, artist, publisher and lawyer Klaus Staeck has been causing a stir in Germany. Often used in protests against environmental destruction, Staeck's art — through evocative images and slogans — calls attention to global warming, ever-growing piles of rubbish, nuclear waste, and the pollution of the air and oceans.
Goethe-Institut

July 13 to June 8, 2014
Perspectives: Rina Banerjee
Born in India and based in New York City, artist Rina Banerjee draws on her background as a scientist and her experience as an immigrant in her richly textured works that complicate the role of objects as representations of cultures and invite viewers to share her fascination in materials.
Arthur M. Sackler Gallery

Through July 28
Edvard Munch: A 150th Anniversary Tribute
This 150th birthday tribute to Edvard Munch (1863–1944), Norway's most famed painter and printmaker, includes more than 20 renowned works from the gallery's collection and a unique series of six variant impressions.
National Gallery of Art

Through Aug. 4
Arts of Japan: Edo Aviary and Poetic License
Complementary but distinct installations examine two themes of Edo period art: "Edo Aviary," which traces how depictions of birds were influenced by natural history painting, and "Poetic License: Making Old Words New," which shows how classical Japanese and Chinese literary traditions were absorbed into the merchant and artisan classes.
Freer Gallery of Art

Through Aug. 4
Views of Panama
Photographers Gabriel Benaim, José Manuel Castrellón and Lorena Endara examine the stunning transformation Panama has undertaken in the last few years, manifested into a real estate and building boom that has changed Panama City's skyline.
OAS Art Museum of the Americas
F Street Gallery

Through Aug. 4
A World of Bonds: Frederick Sommer's Photography and Friendships
Frederick Sommer (1905–99) explored an unusually broad array of subjects ranging from disorienting landscapes and macabre aspects of the natural world to surreal arrangements of found objects and virtual abstractions.
National Gallery of Art

Through Aug. 11
Hand-Held: Gerhard Pulverer's Japanese Illustrated Books
More than 100 volumes reflect on the Edo period Japan (1615-1868) as an age of great social and political change that gave rise to an unprecedented "reading culture" of artists, writers and publishers. Similar to blogging and e-publication in the 21st century, illustrated books (ehon) in Edo Japan opened up a new avenue with which to share ideas, marked by epic levels of publishing and book consumption.
Arthur M. Sackler Gallery

Through Sept. 1
David Levinthal: War Games
David Levinthal, a central figure in the history of American postmodern photography, has staged uncanny tableaux using toys and miniature dioramas for nearly 40 years. Mounted to celebrate the museum's acquisition of a major, career-spanning body of work, this exhibition is the first to feature all of the artist's work on the subject of war.
Corcoran Gallery of Art

Through Sept. 1
Georges Braque and the Cubist Still Life, 1928–1945
Featuring 44 sumptuous canvases, the exhibition charts French cubist master Georges Braque's (1882-1963) work in the still-life genre — from depictions of intimate interiors in the late 1920s, to vibrant, large-scale canvases in the 1930s, to darker and more personal spaces in the 1940s.
The Phillips Collection

Through Sept. 2
Diaghilev and the Ballets Russes, 1909-1929: When Art Danced with Music
More than 130 original costumes, set designs, paintings, sculptures, prints and drawings, photographs and posters reveal how the Ballets Russes — the most innovative dance company of the 20th century — propelled the performing arts to new heights through groundbreaking collaborations between artists, composers, choreographers, dancers and fashion designers.
National Gallery of Art

Through Sept. 2
Nine Deaths, Two Births: Xu Bing's Phoenix Project
Chinese artist Xu Bing spent more than two years creating his newest work, "Phoenix Project," a massive installation that comprises two birds fabricated entirely from materials found at construction sites in Beijing.
Arthur M. Sackler Gallery

Through Sept. 8
Over, Under, Next: Experiments in Mixed Media, 1913-Present
Butterfly wings, glass shards, doll parts, crumpled automotive metal, jigsaw puzzle pieces, clothing, straight pins, furniture, and colored sand — these are just some of the materials in "Over, Under, Next," an exhibition of approximately 100 examples of collage and assemblage, primarily drawn from the Hirshhorn's collection.
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden

Through Sept. 15
Fusion: Tracing Asian Migration to the Americas
Through the permanent collection of the Art Museum of the Americas, one of the most vital sources of contemporary Latin American and Caribbean art in the United States, this exhibition explores the migration of artists or their families to the Americas from Asia during the second half of the 19th century and the first half of the 20th century.
Art Museum of the Americas

Through Sept. 22
Bice Lazzari: Signature Line
In collaboration with the Italian Embassy, this exhibit features 25 paintings and drawings by Lazzari (1900-81), one of Italy's most revered modern artists. Discouraged from studying the figure in art school in the 1910s because of her gender, she became a prominent decorative arts designer who became for her later poetic abstract paintings.
National Museum of Women in the Arts

Through Sept. 29
A Book Behind Bars: The Robben Island Shakespeare
Nelson Mandela signed his name next to a passage from "Julius Caesar" in Shakespeare's "Complete Works" on Dec. 16, 1977, while serving 18 years as a political prisoner at Robben Island. More than 30 of Mandela's fellow prisoners also signed their names next to passages, documenting a part of their experience through their shared knowledge of Shakespeare. Accompanying the Robben Island Shakespeare book — on display for the first time in the United States — is a series of sketches Mandela made in the early 2000s, reflecting on his prison life.
Folger Shakespeare Library

Through Sept. 29
WAR/PHOTOGRAPHY: Images of Armed Conflict and Its Aftermath
This landmark exhibition revolutionizes our understanding of war, immersing viewers in the experience of soldiers and civilians through images by more than 200 photographers from 28 nations that span conflicts from the past 165 years — from the Mexican-American War through present-day conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan.
Corcoran Gallery of Art

Through Oct. 6
Peter Coffin: Here & There
Throughout his career, Peter Coffin has created an unpredictable and eclectic array of works, including many that express a sense of joy and sometimes, humor.
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden

Through Oct. 13
Out of Southeast Asia: Art that Sustains
The last exhibition presented in the Textile Museum's historic location before the museum's 2014 reopening promises to be a beautiful pairing of tradition and innovation, demonstrating how four artists are reinventing traditional Southeast Asian textile techniques, designs and ideology in new and meaningful ways.
The Textile Museum

Through Nov. 10
Awake in a Dream World: The Art of Audrey Niffenegger
The first major museum exhibition of visual artist and author of "The Time Traveler's Wife" reveals a mysterious, strange and whimsical world, both real and imagined, through 239 paintings, drawings, prints and book art.
National Museum of Women in the Arts

Through Dec. 31
S.O.S. Spanish Office Showroom
As part of the SPAIN arts & culture program (www.spainculture.us), "S.O.S. Spanish Office Showroom" presents the most avant-garde pieces of Spanish design conceived for modern working environments, highlighting how the creativity of contemporary Spanish designers adapts to any office space and how Spanish design companies are successfully competing in international markets, such as the United States.
Former Spanish Residence

Through Jan. 5
A Democracy of Images: Photographs from the Smithsonian American Art Museum
More than 100 photographs selected from the Smithsonian American Art Museum's permanent collection celebrate the 30th anniversary of the establishment of the museum's photography collection, examine photography's evolution in the United States from a documentary medium to a full-fledged artistic genre, and showcase the numerous ways in which it has captured the American experience.
American Art Museum

Through Jan. 5
Earth Matters: Land as Material and Metaphor in the Arts of Africa
Some 100 exceptional works of art from the late 18th to 21st centuries come together for the first major exhibition and scholarly endeavor to comprehensively examine the rich relationship between African artists and the land upon which they live, work and frame their days.
National Museum of African Art

Through Jan. 12
Living Artfully: At Home with Marjorie Merriweather Post
From the glamour of Palm Beach, to the rustic whimsy of the Adirondacks, to the distinguished social scene of Washington, D.C., heiress Marjorie Merriweather Post brought to her multiple residences a flawless style of living and entertaining that was made possible only through the gracious management of loyal staff.
Hillwood Estate, Museum and Gardens

Through Feb. 9
Lines, Marks, and Drawings: Through the Lens of Roger Ballen
This exhibit considers the 40-year-plus career of Roger Ballen, one of the more recognized photographic artists working today, through a new approach: an examination of line and drawing in his photographs.
National Museum of African Art

DANCE

Sun., July 7, 2 p.m.
Golden Dragon Acrobats from China
With its astonishing balancing acts, gravity-defying juggling and colorful costumes, the Golden Dragon Acrobats carry on a Chinese performance tradition that began more than 25 centuries ago. Tickets are $38
Wolf Trap Filene Center

FESTIVALS

July 3 to 7
Smithsonian Folklife Festival
This year's Smithsonian Folklife Festival, an international exposition of living cultural heritage produced annually on the National Mall, features the themes "Hungarian Heritage: Roots to Revival," "One World, Many Voices: Endangered Languages and Cultural Heritages" and "The Will to Adorn: African American Diversity, Style and Identity."
National Mall

July 11 to 28
Capital Fringe Festival
The eighth annual Capital Fringe Festival takes over D.C. with hundreds of performances by adventurous and innovative performing artists from the Washington metro area, elsewhere in the United States and overseas. Performances take place in more than 20 traditional and non-traditional performance venues, and include works ranging from theater, dance, and puppetry to the unclassifiable. For information, visit www.capitalfringe.org.
Various locations

Fri., July 12, 7 p.m.
Bastille Day
The Embassy of France welcomes Washingtonians to Comité Tricolore's annual Bastille Day celebration, featuring a buffet by chefs from some of the area's top restaurants, live jazz performances, open bar, and an array of luxurious items in the one-of-a-kind silent auction. Tickets are $95 to $150.
La Maison Française

 THEATER

Through July 6
One Destiny
This one-act play by Richard Hellesen brings the drama and emotion of the American Civil War to life by capturing the emotions of that fateful night in 1865 that killed Abraham Lincoln, as told through the eyewitness accounts of actor Harry Hawk and Ford's Theatre co-owner Harry Ford, among others. Please call for ticket information.
Ford's Theatre

Through July 7
Anything Goes
All aboard for Roundabout Theatre Company's saucy and splendid production of the beloved musical "Anything Goes," winner of three 2011 Tony Awards. Tickets are $25 to $115.
Kennedy Center Opera House

July 9 to Aug. 18
The Book of Mormon
Nine 2011 Tony Awards say it's the Best Musical of the Year. Vogue says, "It's the funniest musical of all time." And the New York Times says, "It's the best musical of this century." It's "The Book of Mormon," the Broadway phenomenon from "South Park" creators Trey Parker and Matt Stone and "Avenue Q" co-creator Robert Lopez. Tickets are $43 to $250.
Kennedy Center Opera House

July 10 to Aug. 4
The Third Beast
A series of characters tries to escape everyday life in search of true identity in "The Third Breast," written in 1975 by one of Poland's "angry young men," Ireneusz Iredyński (1939-85), who explores such themes as addiction to power; fear of the other; the search for an absolute; love and erotic fascination; and the consequences of blind faith. Tickets are $20 to $40 (for mature audiences).
Mead Theater Lab at Flashpoint

July 13 to Aug. 19
Salomé
Scena Theatre, in the final production of its 25th anniversary season, presents Oscar Wilde's engrossing biblical tragedy in one act — a provocative, controversial stage play that is rarely performed. Tickets are $35 or $40.
Atlas Performing Arts Center

Through July 14
Angel Street
Angel Street, otherwise known as "Gaslight," focuses on a seemingly normal couple, the Manninghams. Is the handsome Jack Manningham a caring husband, or is he discreetly trying to drive his young wife Bella into insanity under the guise of kindness? It takes an extraordinarily dedicated Scotland Yard detective to unravel this delightfully twisted thriller. Tickets are $32.50 to $65.
Olney Theatre Center

Through July 21
Rabbit Hole
The Keegan Theatre presents David Lindsay-Abaire's "Rabbit Hole," which charts one couple's journey from darkness to light with empathy and great imagination. Tickets are $35.
Church Street Theater

Last Edited on June 27, 2013