Films -February 2016

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Languages

Amharic

Farsi

Hungarian

Spanish


Cantonese

French

Japanese

Turkish


Czech

Greek

Polish

Ukranian

English

Hebrew

Russian

Amharic

Mussa

Directed by Anat Goren

(Israel, 2015, 60 min.)

Twelve-year-old Mussa won't speak. A refugee from Darfur living in Tel Aviv, he's been bussed from his troubled neighborhood to an upscale private school for the past five years. Despite the bond he shares with his friends and teacher, Mussa is alone; his parents struggle to make ends meet, leaving Mussa with his voiceless thoughts (Amharic, Arabic, English and Hebrew).

West End Cinema

Mon., Feb. 29, 7:30 p.m.

 

Cantonese

IP Man 3

Directed by Wilson Yip

(Hong Kong, 2015, 105 min.)

Donnie Yen ignites the screen in a return to the role that made him an icon — as Ip Man, the real-life Wing Chun grandmaster who mentored Bruce Lee. In this third installment of the blockbuster martial arts series, when a band of brutal gangsters led by a crooked property developer (Mike Tyson) make a play to take over the city, Master Ip is forced to take a stand.

AMC Rio Cinemas 18

 

Czech

Cremator

Directed by Juraj Herz

(Czechoslovakia, 1969, 95 min.)

Karl works at a stately crematorium in Prague. Obsessed with his duties, he believes he is liberating the souls of the departed. With Nazi forces gathering at the Czech border, Karl descends into a mania that allows him to wholly enact his disturbed beliefs.

Washington DCJCC

Fri., Feb. 26, 1 p.m.

AFI Silver Theatre

Sun., Feb. 28, 12:30 p.m.

 

English

45 Years

Directed by Andrew Haigh

(U.K., 2015, 95 min.)

A married couple preparing to celebrate their wedding anniversary receive shattering news that promises to forever change the course of their lives.

Landmark's E Street Cinema

 

On the Banks of the Tigris: The Hidden Story of Iraqi Music

Directed by Marsha Emerman

(Australia, 2015, 79 min.)

Majid Shokor, a Muslim Iraqi living in Australia, finds a hidden Jewish connection in his favorite childhood music. Startled and energized by this discovery, he travels to Europe, Israel and Iraq, meeting musicians of all faiths who share his love of the Iraqi sound (English and Arabic).

Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinema

Thu., Feb. 25, 8:45 p.m.

Washington DCJCC

Sun., Feb. 28, 7 p.m.

West End Cinema

Mon., Feb. 29, 8:30 p.m.

 

Carvalho's Journey

Directed by Steve Rivo

(U.S., 2015, 85 min.)

At a time when the US was busy pushing and re-defining its borders, the nascent medium of photography was just starting to take root. At the center of this artistic and geographic expansion stood an observant Sephardic Jew from South Carolina, Solomon Carvalho.

Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinema

Mon., Feb. 29, 6:30 p.m.

 

Chimes at Midnight

Directed by Orson Welles

(France/Spain/Switzerland, 1965, 116 min.)

This brilliantly crafted Shakespeare adaptation was the culmination of Orson Welles's lifelong obsession with the Bard's ultimate rapscallion, Sir John Falstaff, the loyal, often soused childhood friend to King Henry IV's wayward son Prince Hal. Here, Falstaff is the main event: a robustly funny and ultimately tragic screen antihero played by Welles with towering, lumbering grace.

Landmark's E Street Cinema

Opens Fri., Feb. 12

 

Eva Hesse

Directed by Marcie Begleiter

(U.S., 2015, 105 min.)

German-American artist Eva Hesse (1936-1970) created her innovative art in latex and fiberglass in the whirling aesthetic vortex of 1960s New York — her flowing forms were in part a reaction to the rigid structures of then-popular minimalism, largely a male-dominated movement.

National Gallery of Art

Sat., Feb. 27, 3 p.m.

 

The Lady in the Van

Directed by Nicholas Hytner

(U.K., 2016, 104 min.)

In 1973, the residents of the leafy London enclave of Camden Town found their liberal pieties tested by the arrival of an eccentric, elderly vagrant who lived out of her van and upset the neighborhood's prevailing pretensions of charity and inclusiveness.

Angelika Mosaic

Landmark's E Street Cinema

 

Look at Us Now, Mother!

Directed by Gayle Kirschenbaum

(U.S./India/France, 2015, 84 min.)

Gayle Kirschenbaum is unmarried, artistic and independent — not to mention the one with the big nose. With a mother as loudly critical as hers, the wounds dated back to childhood. The two women take a trip to India together, sign up for the same dating site, and even seek out couples' therapy.

Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinema

Thu., Feb. 25, 6:15 p.m.

JCC of Greater Washington, Rockville

Sun., Feb. 28, 1:30 p.m.

 

The Man on the Moon

Directed by Mark Craig

(U.K., 2016, 95 min.)

When Apollo astronaut Gene Cernan stepped off the moon in December 1972 he left his footprints and his daughter's initials in the lunar dust. Only now is he ready to share his epic but deeply personal story of fulfillment, love and loss.

Angelika Pop-Up at Union Market

Opens Fri., Feb. 26

 

Many Beautiful Things

Directed by Laura Waters Hinson

(U.S./Morocco/U.K., 2015, 70 min.)

Lilias Trotter, a great but obscure female artist, managed to win the favor of the celebrated critic John Ruskin in Victorian England — an age when it was generally assumed that women were incapable of producing high art. With her legacy on the line, however, Lilias made the seemingly odd decision to travel to French Algeria to work with women and children. We are left to ponder, how might the history of art have been different if Lilias had remained in England?

National Gallery of Art

Sat., Feb. 6, 2:30 p.m.

 

Portrait of a Serial Monogamist

Directed by Christina Zeidler and John Mitchell

(Canada, 2015, 82 min.)

Fortysomething Toronto TV producer Elsie is the kind of nice Jewish girl your mother warned you about: the serial monogamist who seems to have slept with everyone in town. When Elsie coolly cuts it off with sweet performance artist Robyn, her friends challenge her to stay single for five months — no bars, no clubs, and (for goodness sake) no volunteer work.

Washington DCJCC

Mon., Feb. 29, 6:15 p.m.

 

Race

Directed by Stephen Hopkins

(France/Germany/Canada, 2016,

Jesse Owens's quest to become the greatest track and field athlete in history thrusts him onto the world stage of the 1936 Olympics, where he faces off against Adolf Hitler's vision of Aryan supremacy.

Area theaters

Opens Fri., Feb. 19

 

The Record Man

Directed by Mark Moormann

(U.S./Bahamas, 2015, 110 min.)

Brooklyn-born Henry Stone exported the music of Miami to the world. From distributing records out of his '48 Packard to establishing the largest independent label of the 1970s, he was a shrewd record executive with an ear for hits and a knack for discovering talent.

AFI Silver Theatre

Sun., Feb. 28, 2:30 p.m.

Washington DCJCC

Mon., Feb. 29, 8:15 p.m.

 

In Search of Israeli Cuisine

Directed by Roger Sherman

(U.S., 2016, 97 min.)

If you believe the fastest way to the heart is through the stomach, this delectable, eye-popping culinary journey through Israel is your personal valentine.

Landmark's E Street Cinema

Sun., Feb. 28, 5:15 p.m.

 

Where to Invade Next

Directed by Michael Moore

(U.S., 2016, 110 min.)

"Where to Invade Next" is an expansive, rib-tickling, subversive comedy in which Michael Moore, playing the role of "invader," visits a host of nations to learn how the U.S. could improve its own prospects.

Angelika Mosaic

Area theaters

Opens Fri., Feb. 12

 

The Witch

Directed by Robert Eggers

(Canada/U.S., 2016, 92 min.)

A family in 1630s New England is torn apart by the forces of witchcraft, black magic and possession.

Area theaters

Opens Fri., Feb. 19

 

Farsi

316

Directed by Payman Haghadi

(Iran, 2014, 72 min.)

Can the story of a nation be told entirely through shoes? An old woman who has lived through Iran's tumultuous recent history, she recalls the events of her life and her nation through the shoes she and those close to her wore over the years.

Freer Gallery of Art

Sat., Feb. 27, 5 p.m.

 

Atomic Heart

Directed by Ali Ahmadzadeh

(Iran, 2015, 93 min.)

In this surreal Tehran nocturne, two drunk party girls get into a car accident and receive help from a mysterious stranger. He pays off the other driver and enlists the girls in an errand involving a supposedly dead dictator, whose weapons of mass destruction are hidden in another dimension.

Freer Gallery of Art

Sun., Feb. 28, 7 p.m.

 

Jafar Panahi's Taxi

Directed by Jafar Panahi

(Iran, 2015, 82 min.)

The affable director crisscrosses Tehran behind the wheel of a taxi, giving rides to a variety of denizens, ranging from a pirated DVD dealer to his charmingly chatty young niece, to the human rights lawyer who worked with him when he was in prison.

Freer Gallery of Art

Sat., Feb. 20, 5 p.m.

 

Melbourne

Directed by Nima Javidi

(Iran, 2014, 91 min.)

Set entirely in the apartment of a young couple getting ready for a trip to Australia, it features gripping performances from two of Iran's most talented actors, Peyman Moaadi and Negar Javaherian. Amid the bustle of final preparations, an unexpected tragedy forces the couple to debate decisions with serious moral implications and no easy answers.

Freer Gallery of Art

Sun., Feb. 21, 5 p.m.

 

Monir

Directed by Bahman Kiarostami

(Iran, 2015, 54 min.)

Bahman Kiarostami's new documentary looks at Iranian artist Monir Shahroudy Farmanfarmaian, who pioneered new forms of geometric mirror work in the 1970s. The film is preceded by "Wolkaan" (2015, 30 min.), in which two unfolding family stories — one set in Tehran and the other somewhere in middle America — dip into strange and seemingly unrelated episodes.

National Gallery of Art

Sat., Feb. 13, 2 p.m.

 

French

No Home Movie

Directed by Chantal Akerman

(France/Belgium, 2015, 115 min.)

At the center of Chantal Akerman's enormous body of work is her mother, a Holocaust survivor who married and raised a family in Brussels.

AFI Silver Theatre

Mon., Feb. 29, 7:15 p.m.

 

Once in a Lifetime

Directed by Marie-Castille Mention-Schaar

(France, 2014, 105 min.)

A dedicated high school history teacher in France is determined to give her inner-city pupils the best education possible. Overcoming their apathy, however, is proving to be difficult. Frustrated but undaunted, Anne tests her multicultural and multi-faith classroom with a unique assignment: a national competition on the theme of child victims of the Nazi concentration camps.

Landmark's E Street Cinema

Sat., Feb. 27, 4:15 p.m.

Greek

Forever

(Gia panta)

Directed by Margarita Manda

(Greece, 2014, 82 min.)

Costas, a driver on the Athens rapid transit green line finds himself enamored of Anna, a passenger he notices daily taking his train from Athens to Piraeus. Too wary to reach out, Costas remains content to quietly watch as Anna makes the daily trek to her job as a ticket seller, until an unforeseen event finally offers Costas his golden ticket.

National Gallery of Art

Sun., Feb. 14, 4 p.m.

 

Xenia

Directed by Panos H. Koutras

(Greece/France/Belgium, 2014, 134 min.)

Two brothers meet in Athens for a road trip to Thessaloniki, where they hope to track down their estranged biological father — a Greek who never married their now-deceased Albanian mother (Greek, Albanian and Italian).

National Gallery of Art

Sun., Feb. 7, 4 p.m.

Hebrew

Arabic Movie

Directed by Eyal Sagui Bizawe and Sara Tsifroni

(Israel, 2015, 60 min.)

It is hard to believe today, but not long ago, Israeli families of all backgrounds would huddle next to the TV each Friday to watch the week's "Egyptian movie" — usually a heart-rending melodrama or musical. Did anybody ever wonder how Israel's official TV station was able to bypass sealed borders to obtain these beloved Arab Movies of the Week (Hebrew and Arabic)?

Landmark's E Street Cinema

Sat., Feb. 27, 12:30 p.m.

Washington DCJCC

Sun., Feb. 28, 5 p.m.

 

Baba Joon

Directed by Yuval Delshad

(Israel, 2015, 91 min.)

Yitzhak runs the turkey farm his father built after they immigrated from Iran to Israel. When his son Moti turns 13, Yitzhak teaches him the trade in hopes that he will take over the family business — but Moti's dreams lie elsewhere (Hebrew and Farsi; opening night of the Washington Jewish Film Festival).

AFI Silver Theatre

Wed., Feb. 24, 6:30 p.m.

Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinema

Thu., Feb. 25, 6:30 p.m.

 

Barash

Directed by Michal Vinik

(Israel, 2015, 90 min.)

Naama Barash, 17, enjoys drugs, alcohol and hanging out with like-minded friends, while her rebellious, army-enrolled sister wreaks havoc by dating a Palestinian before going AWOL altogether. As her parents fret about their older daughter's disappearance, Naama meets a wild girl in school and discovers the intoxicating rush of first love.

Landmark's E Street Cinema

Sat., Feb. 27, 8:45 p.m.

 

The Chaos Within

Directed by Yakov Yanai Lein

(Israel, 2014, 85 min.)

For 10 years, Yakov Yanai Lein tracks his relationship with his mother, a Holocaust survivor who learned the secrets of Kaballah from her husband before devoting herself to saving humanity from self-destruction. Closer to home, she helps Yanai collect the shattered pieces of his heroin-saturated past and save his own world.

Landmark's E Street Cinema

Mon., Feb. 29, 6:15 p.m.

 

Encirclements

Directed by Lee Gilat

(Israel, 2014, 98 min.)

A 13-year-old growing up in a working class Moroccan-Israeli community, Aharon is having a tough time. His father is distant; bullies hound him on the street; and the girl of his dreams barely knows he exists. When he is chosen to carry the Torah scrolls for Simchat Torah, however, his streak of bad luck seems over.

JCC of Greater Washington, Rockville

Sat., Feb. 27, 7:30 p.m.

 

Marzipan Flowers

Directed by Adam Kalderon

(Israel, 2014, 73 min.)

After her husband dies in an accident, a 48-year-old kibbutznik is scrutinized by neighbors and threatened by her status as a beautiful widow. Lonely and out of her element, she forges a connection with a new roommate, a transgender woman with a mysterious past.

West End Cinema

Sat., Feb. 27, 4:30 p.m.

Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinema

Mon., Feb. 29, 6:45 p.m.

 

Mountain

Directed by Yaelle Kayam

(Israel/Denmark, 2015, 83 min.)

An Orthodox woman lives in the Jewish cemetery on Jerusalem's Mount of Olives. While her husband works and the children are at school, she is left alone on the hill. One night, she happens onto an unsettling sexual scene.

Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinema

Thu., Feb. 25, 6:30 p.m.

AFI Silver Theatre

Sat., Feb. 27, 6:45 p.m.

Landmark's E Street Cinema

Sun., Feb. 28, 3:15 p.m.

 

Tikkun

Directed by Avishai Sivan

(Israel, 2015, 120 min.)

A young ultra-Orthodox man experiences a crisis of faith in this formally daring drama that employs bravura and often-shocking imagery (Hebrew and Yiddish).

Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinema

Mon., Feb. 29, 8:15 p.m.

 

Vita Activa: The Spirit of Hannah Arendt

Directed by Ada Ushpiz

(Israel/Canada, 2015, 125 min.)

The German-Jewish philosopher Hannah Arendt caused uproar by coining the subversive concept of the "Banality of Evil" while reporting on the trial of Adolph Eichmann. Her private life was equally controversial (Hebrew, English and German).

Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinema

Mon., Feb. 29, 8:45 p.m.

 

Wedding Doll

Directed by Nitzan Gilady

(Israel, 2015, 82 min.)

Hagit, a young woman with a mild mental disability, works in a toilet-paper factory and lives with her nurturing and protective single mother. When a relationship develops between her and the son of the factory owner, Hagit hides it from her mother.

Washington DCJCC

Thu., Feb. 25, 8:30 p.m.

West End Cinema

Sat., Feb. 27, 8:30 p.m.

 

Women in Sink

Directed by Irish Zaki

(Israel/U.K., 2015, 40 min.)

This is the story of a little hair salon in the heart of the Arab community in Haifa; it is the story of a friendship between Arab and Jewish women in the city, which is considered a model of coexistence; and it is the story of Iris, the film director.

Washington DCJCC

Sun., Feb. 28, 12:30 p.m.

 

Yona

Directed by Nir Bergman

(Israel/Germany, 2014, 100 min.)

Focusing on the early '60s, we witness a turbulent slice of famed Hebrew poet Yona Wallach's life.

Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinema

Thu., Feb. 25, 8:45 p.m.

 

Hungarian

Son of Saul

(Saul fia)

Directed by László Nemes

(Hungary, 2015, 107 min.)

In the horror of 1944 Auschwitz, a prisoner forced to burn the corpses of his own people finds moral survival upon trying to salvage from the flames the body of a boy he takes for his son (Hungarian, Yiddish, German and Polish).

Landmark's E Street Cinema

 

Japanese

Only Yesterday

(Omohide poro poro)

Directed by Isao Takahata

(Japan, 2016, 118 min.)

It's 1982, and Taeko is 27 years old, unmarried and has lived her whole life in Tokyo. She decides to visit her relatives in the countryside, and as the train travels through the night, memories flood back of her younger years. In lyrical switches between the present and the past, Taeko contemplates the arc of her life, and wonders if she has been true to the dreams of her childhood self.

Landmark's E Street Cinema

Opens Fri., Feb. 26

 

Persona Non-Grata

Directed Cellin Gluck

(Japan, 2016, 135 min.)

The heroic tale of Chiune Sugihara, a Japanese diplomat posted in Lithuania during World War II, is brought to screen in sweeping fashion in this instant epic.

Washington DCJCC

Sat., Feb. 27, 1:30 p.m.

 

Polish

Demon

Directed by Marcin Wrona

(Poland/Israel, 2015, 94 min.)

In this chilling, modern interpretation of the Dybbuk legend, Piotr's joy at visiting his bride-to-be at her Polish home is quickly upended by his discovery of human bones on the property (Polish and Yiddish).

Landmark's E Street Cinema

Thu., Feb. 25, 8:45 p.m.

 

A Grain of Truth

Directed by Borys Lankosz

(Poland, 2015, 110 min.)

A horrendous crime has been committed in the picturesque small town of Sandomierz: The body of a murdered woman, a well-liked local social activist is found. Prosecutor Teodor Szacki, recently moved down from Warsaw, recognizes that the murders are connected to allegedly historic Jewish ritual killings.

Washington DCJCC

Sat., Feb. 27, 4:30 p.m.

 

Klezmer

Directed by Piotr Chrzan

(Poland, 2015, 97 min.)

In 1943, a group of Polish villagers gathering in the woods to discover a listless and injured man. Recognizing him to be a Jewish musician, the party heatedly argue about what to do next: turn him into the authorities for a hefty fee? Leave him be? Hide him?

Landmark's E Street Cinema

Thu. Feb. 25, 6:30 p.m.

Washington DCJCC

Mon., Feb. 29, 3:30 p.m.

 

Raise the Roof

Directed by Yari Wolinsky and Cary Wolinsky

(U.S./Poland, 2014, 85 min.)

Inspired by images of magnificent wooden synagogues in 18th-century Poland — the last of which were destroyed by the Nazis—artists Rick and Laura Brown set out to reconstruct a replica of the stunning, mural-covered Gwozdziec synagogue.

JCC of Greater Washington, Rockville

Sun., Feb. 28, 11:30 a.m.

 

Summer Solstice

Directed by Michal Rogalski

(Poland/Germany, 2015, 95 min.)

Poland, 1943: Love, friendship and fate connect a simple Polish country boy, the daughter of a local farmer, a young German soldier and a Jewish girl from Warsaw. The four of them come across something that both threatens and provides an escape from their harsh reality: love.

Landmark's E Street Cinema

Sat., Feb. 27, 6:30 p.m.

 

Russian

Natasha

Directed by David Bezmozgis

(Canada, 2015, 93 min.)

Sixteen-year-old Mark Berman, the son of Latvian-Jewish immigrants, wiles away his hours reading Nietzsche, smoking pot and watching porn. His slacker lifestyle is upended when a 14-year-old hurricane, named Natasha, enters the picture.

West End Cinema

Sun., Feb. 28, 5 p.m.

 

Song of Songs

Directed by Eva Neymann

(Ukraine, 2015, 76 min.)

Starting with Sholem Aleichem's enchanting tales, Eva Neymann concocts a strong, dreamy potion of a film that invokes young love in a Ukrainian shtetl.

AFI Silver Theatre

Sun., Feb. 28, 5:15 p.m.

 

Spanish

The Club

Directed by Pablo Larraín

(Chile, 2015, 98 min.)

Four priests live together in a secluded house in a small, seaside town. Each of them has been sent to this place to purge the sins from the past, living according to a strict regime under the watchful eye of a female caretaker. The fragile stability of their routine is soon disrupted by the arrival of a fifth man, a newly disgraced companion.

Landmark's E Street Cinema

Opens Fri., Feb. 19

 

Dirty Wolves

Directed by Simón de Miguel

(Spain, 2015, 105 min.)

In this World War II thriller imbued with notes of magical realism, Manuela works in the Wolfram (aka tungsten) mines in rural Galicia. A ruthless Nazi brigade, intent on harvesting the rare metal to feed the Third Reich's war machine, has captured the mines. When Manuela's sister helps a Jewish prisoner cross the border to Portugal, they are unwittingly forced into a desperate test (Spanish and German).

West End Cinema

Sat., Feb. 27, 6:15 p.m.

 

The Dream

(El somni)

Directed by Franc Aleu

(Spain, 2014, 82 min.)

"The Dream" documents a uniquely Spanish experiment in communal creativity. A distinguished assemblage of international artists took part in a dinner event — "an opera in 12 plates." (Spanish, Catalan, English and French; preceded by "The Dream of Luis Moya (2011, 45 min.), which examines one of the strangest architectural projects ever undertaken).

National Gallery of Art

Fri., Feb. 5 7 p.m.

 

The Mamboniks

Directed by Alexis Gillespie

(U.S., 2015, 100 min.)

In the 1950s, a group of free-spirited, mostly Jewish dancers from New York City fell in love with a sultry dance from Cuba called the mambo, earning them a nickname: the mamboniks (Spanish and English).

Landmark's E Street Cinema

Sun., Feb. 28, 12:30 p.m.

 

Viva

Directed by Paddy Breathnach

(Ireland/Cuba, 2016, 100 min.)

Jesus, a young hairdresser working at a Havana nightclub that showcases drag performers, dreams of being a performer himself. Encouraged by his mentor, Jesus finally gets his chance to take the stage. But when his estranged father abruptly reenters his life, his world is quickly turned upside down.

Landmark's E Street Cinema

Opens Fri., Feb. 19

Turkish

Mustang

Directed by Deniz Gamze Ergüven

(France/Germany/Turkey/Qatar, 2015, 97 min.)

In a village in northern Turkey, five free-spirited sisters are walking home from school, playing innocently with some boys. The immorality of their play sets off a scandal that has unexpected consequences.

Landmark's E Street Cinema

Ukranian

The Dybbuk. A Tale of Wandering Souls.

Directed by Krzysztof Kopczynsk

(Poland/Ukraine/Sweden, 2015, 86 min.)

The Ukrainian city of Uman is the burial site of Rebbe Nachman, one of the most important figures of Chasidism. Every year, tens of thousands of Jews travel there to celebrate Rosh Hashanah and visit the Rebbe's grave. The annual flow of visitors helps brings this poor post-communist city back to life, but the ghosts of Ukrainian nationalism and religious intolerance are revived as well.(Ukrainian, Hebrew, Russian and Yiddish).

Washington DCJCC

Fri., Feb. 26, 3 p.m.

Landmark's E Street Cinema

Sat., Feb. 27, 2:15 p.m.

Last Edited on January 28, 2016