Films - July 2016

Print
Print
Share This Page
Increase Text Size Text Reset Decrease Text Size

Languages

Cantonese

Korean


English

Mandarin


French

Spanish

Japanese

Tamil

Cantonese

Happiness

Directed by Andy Lo

(Hong Kong, 2016, 113 min.)

A woman suffering from Alzheimer's takes under her wing an aimless young man who has come to Hong Kong to look for the father who abandoned him. Together these wounded souls make a family of their own in this touching drama.

American History Museum

Fri., July 15, 7 p.m.

 

Ip Man 3

Directed by Wilson Yip

(Hong Kong, 2015, 105 min.)

In the third installment of this popular franchise, Donnie Yen reprises his role as the real-life kung fu master best known for having trained a young Bruce Lee. In this edition, Ip is settling into life as a family man, but he's soon called to protect Hong Kong from a ruthless American businessman (Mike Tyson) who is trying to make a land grab.

American History Museum

Sun., July 31, 2 p.m.

 

My Young Auntie

Directed by Lau Kar-Leung

(Hong Kong, 1981, 100 min.)

Kara Wai won her first Hong Kong Film Award for her effervescent performance in this delightful kung fu comedy in which she plays a young student who marries her dying teacher to keep his inheritance away from his untrustworthy relatives.

American History Museum

Sun., July 17, 2 p.m.

 

Office

Directed by Johnnie To

(Hong Kong/China, 2015, 117 min.)

"Office' depicts the ups and downs — romantic and financial — of a financial firm's staff during 2008's global economic turmoil (Cantonese and Mandarin).

American History Museum

Sat., July 30, 2 p.m.

 

Ten Years

Directed by Ng La-leung

(Hong Kong, 2015, 104 min.)

See the micro-budget sci-fi omnibus that beat "Star Wars: The Force Awakens" at the Hong Kong box office. Made for the equivalent of about $70,000, this collection of five short films, each by a different director, speculates darkly on what Hong Kong will look like in 2025.

American History Museum

Sun., July 24, 2 p.m.

 

English

Absolutely Fabulous: The Movie

Directed by Mandie Fletcher

(U.K./U.S., 2016)

Edina and Patsy are still oozing glitz and glamour, shopping, drinking and clubbing their way around London's trendiest hotspots. Blamed for a major incident at a fashionable launch party, they become entangled in a media storm. Fleeing penniless to the glamorous playground of the super-rich, the French Riviera, they hatch a plan to make their escape permanent.

AFI Silver Theatre

Angelika Mosaic

Landmark's E Street Cinema

Opens Fri., July 22

 

Arabesque

Directed by Stanley Donen

(U.S., 1966, 105 min.)

Asked to crack a hieroglyphic code, American-at-Oxford professor Gregory Peck becomes embroiled, along with mystery woman Sophia Loren, in a plot to assassinate a Middle Eastern politician.

AFI Silver Theatre

Sun., July 3, 2 p.m.

 

A Bigger Splash

Directed by Luca Guadagnino

(Italy/France, 2016, 124 min.)

A sensuous portrait of desire, jealousy and rock 'n' roll under the Mediterranean sun, "A Bigger Splash" stars Tilda Swinton as a rock legend who's recuperating on the volcanic island of Pantelleria with her partner Paul. When iconoclast record producer and old flame Harry unexpectedly arrives with his daughter and interrupts their holiday, he brings with him an A-bomb blast of nostalgia from which there can be no rescue.

Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinema

 

Birth

Directed by Jonathan Glazer

(U.S./U.K./Germany/France, 2004, 100 min.)

After a decade of grieving the death of her young husband Sean, Anna (Nicole Kidman) is ready to move on and marry her boyfriend. Then a mysterious boy arrives, also named Sean, claiming to be the reincarnation of her dead husband — and he knows things only Sean could know.

AFI Silver Theatre

Sun., July 3, 4:20 p.m.,

Wed., July 6, 9 p.m.

 

Eat that Question: Frank Zappa in His Own Words

Directed by Thorsten Schütte

(France/Germany, 2016, 90 min.)

Iconoclastic composer and musician Frank Zappa was an unforgettable character, aggravating and fascinating, whose music never became "popular," but who had an enthusiastic worldwide following, including in Lithuania where fans erected a statue of him. This engaging, intimate portrait reveals a 20th-century musical genius.

Landmark's E Street Cinema

Opens Fri., July 1

 

Genius

Directed by

(U.K./U.S., 2016, 104 min.)

"Genius" chronicles Max Perkins's time as the book editor at Scribner, where he oversaw works by Thomas Wolfe, Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald and others.

Landmark's E Street Cinema

 

Hunt for the Wilderpeople

Directed by Taika Waititi

(New Zealand, 2016, 93 min.)

Defiant city kid Ricky, raised on hip-hop and foster care, gets a fresh start in the New Zealand countryside, where he quickly finds himself at home with his new foster family. When a tragedy strikes that threatens to ship Ricky to another home, both he and his cantankerous Uncle Hec go on the run in the bush and a national manhunt ensues.

AFI Silver Theatre

Angelika Mosaic

Landmark's E Street Cinema

Opens Fri., July 1

 

Indignation

Directed by James Schamus

(U.S., 2016, 110 min.)

Amidst the conformity and political conservatism of 1950s America, a young Jewish man from New Jersey avoids the Korean War draft and joins a Christian college in Ohio instead, but finds himself at odds with everyone from classmates to the dean, especially in matters of religion, or lack of it.

Washington DCJCC

 

Les Cowboys

Directed by Thomas Bidegain

(France, 2015, 104 min.)

Country and Western enthusiast Alain is enjoying an outdoor gathering of fellow devotees with his wife and teenage children when his daughter abruptly vanishes. Learning that she's eloped with her Muslim boyfriend, he embarks on an increasingly obsessive quest to track her down. As the years pass and the trail grows cold, Alain sacrifices everything, while drafting his son into his efforts (English and French).

Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinema

 

The Lobster

Directed by Yorgos Lanthimos

(Greece/Ireland/Netherlands/U.K./France, 2016, 118 min.)

In this highly imaginative, absurdist comedy, Colin Farrell stars as a man who has just been dumped by his wife. To make matters worse, he lives in a dystopian society where single people have 45 days to find true love, or else they are turned into the animal of their choice and released into the woods.

Angelika Mosaic

Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinema

Landmark's E Street Cinema

 

Love & Friendship

Directed by Whit Stillman

(Ireland/Netherlands/France/U.S., 2016, 94 min.)

Beautiful young widow Lady Susan Vernon takes up temporary residence at her in-laws' estate to wait out colorful rumors about her dalliances and to be a matchmaker for her daughter Frederica — and herself too, naturally.

Angelika Mosaic

Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinema

Landmark's E Street Cinema

 

The Music of Strangers

Directed by Morgan Neville

(U.S., 2016, 96 min.)

Named for the ancient trade route linking Asia, Africa and Europe, the Silk Road Ensemble is an international collective created by acclaimed cellist Yo-Yo Ma. Blending performance footage, personal interviews and archival film, the documentary follows this group of diverse musicians as they explore the power of music to preserve tradition, shape cultural evolution and inspire hope.

Angelika Mosaic

Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinema

Landmark's E Street Cinema

 

Our Kind of Traitor

Directed by Susanna White

(U.K./France, 2016, 108 min.)

While on holiday in Marrakech, an ordinary English couple, befriend a flamboyant and charismatic Russian, who unbeknownst to them is a kingpin money launderer for the Russian mafia. When he asks for their help to deliver classified information to the British Secret Services, the couple gets caught in a dangerous world of international espionage and dirty politics (English, Russian and French).

Angelika Mosaic

Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinema

Landmark's E Street Cinema

Opens Fri., July 1

 

Seoul Searching

Directed by Benson Lee

(South Korea/China/U.S., 2016, 105 min.)

During the 1980s, the Korean government created a special summer camp for "gyopo" or foreign born teenagers where they could spend their summer in Seoul to learn about their motherland. While the intentions of the program were honorable, the activities of the teens were not (English, Korean and German).

Angelika Pop-Up at Union Market

Opens Fri., July 1

 

Sing Street

Directed by John Carney

(Ireland/U.K./U.S., 2016, 106 min.)

Dublin in the 1980s is seen through the eyes of a 14-year-old boy who is looking for a break from a home strained by his parents' relationship and money troubles, while trying to adjust to his new inner-city public school where the kids are rough and the teachers are rougher. Trying to impress a beautiful classmate, he forms a band with a few lads, and the group pours their heart into writing lyrics and shooting videos.

Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinema

 

Swiss Army Man

Directed by Daniel Scheinert and Daniel Kwan

(U.S., 2016, 95 min.)

Hank is stranded on a deserted island, having given up all hope of ever making it home again. But one day everything changes when a corpse named Manny washes up on shore and the two become friends.

Angelika Mosaic

Atlantic Plumbing Cinema

Opens Fri., July 1

 

Tickled

Directed by David Farrier and Dylan Reeve

(New Zealand, 2016, 92 min.)

Journalist David Farrier stumbles upon a mysterious tickling competition online. As he delves deeper, he comes up against fierce resistance, but that doesn't stop him getting to the bottom of a story stranger than fiction.

Atlantic Plumbing Cinema

 

What We Do in the Shadows

Directed by Taiki Waititi

(New Zealand/U.S., 2015, 86 min.)

An endearingly unhip quartet of vampires (ranging in age from 183 to 8,000 years old) squabble over household chores, struggle to keep up with the latest trends, antagonize the local werewolves and deal with the rigors of living on a very, very strict diet.

AFI Silver Theatre

July 1 to 3

 

Zero Days

Directed by Alex Gibney

(U.S., 2016, 114 min.)

For the first time, a film tells the alarming complete story of Stuxnet, a piece of self-replicating computer malware that was apparently unleashed by the U.S. and Israel to destroy a key part of an Iranian nuclear facility, and which ultimately spread beyond its intended target (English, Farsi, German and French).

Landmark's E Street Cinema

Opens Fri., July 8

 

French

The Innocents

(Les innocents)

Directed by Anne Fontaine

(France/Poland, 2016, 115 min.)

In 1945 Poland, a young French Red Cross doctor who is sent to assist the survivors of World War II German camps discovers several nuns in advanced states of pregnancy during a visit to a nearby convent. Fearing the shame of exposure, the hostility of the new anti-Catholic Communist government and facing an unprecedented crisis of faith, the nuns increasingly turn to the worker as their belief and traditions clash with harsh realities (French, Polish and Russian).

Landmark's E Street Cinema

Opens Fri., July 8

 

Microbe and Gasoline

(Microbe et Gasoil)

Directed by Michel Gondry

(France, 2015, 103 min.)

Microbe, a shy, aspiring artist, has trouble making friends at school until he meets Gasoline, a likeminded outcast. Together they hatch a plan to build a car and spend their summer on an epic road trip across France.

Landmark's E Street Cinema

Opens Fri., July 15

 

Phantom Boy

Directed by Jean-Loup Felicioli and Alain Gagnol

(France/Belgium, 2016, 84 min.)

A super-powered boy helps a wheelchair-bound policeman in his attempt to bring down a mob kingpin in this animated film.

Landmark's E Street Cinema

Opens Fri., July 29

 

Pierrot Le Fou

Directed by Jean-Luc Godard

(France/Italy, 1965, 110 min.)

An existentially conflicted husband and father, inspires the latter to run off with babysitter/former girlfriend/gangster Anna Karina on a road trip to the South of France, but murder and mayhem shadow their frolic.

AFI Silver Theatre

Mon., July 4, 7:15 p.m.

 

 

Japanese

Our Little Sister

(Umimachi Diary)

Directed by Hirokazu Koreeda

(Japan, 2015, 128 min.)

Three sisters live together in their late grandmother's house ever since their father left home for another woman. After the death of their father, the trio learn about the existence of a 13-year-old half-sister, who comes to live with them.

Landmark's E Street Cinema

Opens Fri., July 15

 

Korean

My Love, Don't Cross That River

Directed by Mo-young Jin

(South Korea, 2014, 86 min.)

A couple who have lived together for 76 years faces the last moments of their marriage.

Angelika Pop-Up at Union Market

Opens Fri., July 8

 

Mandarin

The Mermaid

Directed by Stephen Chow

(China/Hong Kong, 2016, 94 min.)

When an island development threatens their habitat, a mermaid family sends one of its number to assassinate the greedy entrepreneur. But instead of using her sack of weaponized sea urchins to kill him, she falls in love.

American History Museum

Sat., July 23, 2 p.m.

 

 

Spanish

Academy of the Muses

(La academia de las musas)

Directed by José Luis Guerín

(Spain, 2016, 92 min.)

When he returns from teaching class, a professor of philology is interrogated by his wife, who distrusts his pedagogical approach, and his Academy of the Muses, which, inspired by classical references, is intended to regenerate the world through poetry (Spanish, Catalan and Italian).

National Gallery of Art

Sun., July 17, 4 p.m.

 

Tamil

Dheepan

Directed by Jacques Audiard

(France, 2016, 115 min.)

Dheepan is a Tamil freedom fighter who flees his native Sri Lanka when the civil war is reaching its end. At a refugee camp, he joins a woman and a little girl, both strangers, to pretend to be a family, hoping that they will make it easier for him to claim political asylum. Arriving in Paris, Dheepan finds work as the caretaker of a run-down housing block in the suburbs, where he works to build a new life and a real home for his "wife" and his "daughter," but the daily violence he confronts in his new neighborhood quickly reopens his war wounds (Tamil, French and English).

Landmark's Bethesda Row Cinema

Last Edited on July 1, 2016